Hall Green - St Ambrose Barlow

A functional structure of 1981 by Lanner of Wakefield.

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Hampton-on-the-Hill - St Charles Borromeo

An early example of a Catholic chapel, built at the expense of Lord Dormer, who also paid for the building to be extended and elaborated in 1830. The building is in a pre-archaeological Gothic Revival style. The most striking feature of the interior is the sanctuary recess with its elaborate marble altar, probably also a gift of Lord Dormer.

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Handsworth - St Augustine of England

A neo-Romanesque design by G. B. Cox, completed just before the outbreak of the Second World War.  The interior is particularly attractive and there are several good original fittings, including a fine Renaissance-style baldacchino.

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Handsworth - St Francis

A late nineteenth century church by A. J. C. Scoles in his favoured thirteenth century Gothic style. The exterior is plain if not dour in character, but the interior is filled with colour and retains furnishings of note, including the original high altar and reredos and an extensive set of stained glass by the Hardman firm.  The church was built on land given by the Hardman family, and the former home of John Hardman is now the presbytery. Nearby is A. W. Pugin’s Convent of Mercy. Together these buildings constitute a group of strong Catholic interest in the Lozells and Soho Hill Conservation Area.   

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Harborne - St Mary

A church building of two contrasting halves, separated by a hundred years: a compact, Gothic Revival building of 1877 by Dunn & Hansom, and a bold open-plan church added in 1977. The former is a good example of a late nineteenth century urban church, and still provides an attractive focus to the street scene. However, it has been diminished internally by the 1977 remodelling. The 1977 building is spacious and light, but has little heritage significance. 

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Harvington - St Mary

A simple Gothic-style church of 1825, the oldest Catholic church in the area, predating Emancipation. It is situated next to Harvington Hall, a recusant site of great significance in the history of Midlands Catholicism. The church forms part of a historic group in the rural setting of the hall, which also includes the presbytery of 1838 (attached to the church), the former stables and the churchyard boundary wall.

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Haunton - St Michael and St James

A handsome and substantial building largely of 1901-2 by Edmund Kirby, but with a late nineteenth century chancel which incorporates medieval masonry. The church stands in a large burial ground with mature planting, a presbytery of 1905 and a former school (now Community Hall). The simple interior is dominated by heavy scissor trussed roofs and contains a good collection of early twentieth century glass, mainly by Hardman and Co. The Romanesque ‘font’ is an imported item of uncertain provenance. Together with the other buildings and burial ground, the church makes a notable contribution to the local conservation area.  

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Hednesford - Our Lady of Lourdes

An ambitious and self-confident Gothic design by G. B. Cox, erected between the wars as a replica of the Marian shrine at Lourdes. Next to the church is a Lourdes grotto, formed at about the same time. The building makes a strong contribution to the local streetscape and is of significance as a diocesan pilgrimage centre.

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Henley-on-Thames - Sacred Heart

An interwar Arts and Crafts Gothic brick church by A. S. G. Butler, the main interest of which lies in the furnishings from the former Danesfield chapel (built by A. W. Pugin for Charles Scott Murray and completed by E. W. Pugin). These include the east window by Hardman & Co, the high altar and reredos, and the font. The high altar has been described as ‘the most important altar ensemble by E. W. Pugin to survive’.

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Hethe - Holy Trinity

An attractive stone-built group of church, presbytery and former school building in a pastoral edge-of-village setting. The design is unassertive, almost vernacular in character. The Gothic church has an interior of domestic character, with good furnishings and decoration, including a stencil decorative scheme of the 1930s and stained glass by John Barnett. Most unusually, the sanctuary retains its pre-Vatican II arrangement. 

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Holbrook - Holy Family

A large church built on a tapering cruciform plan shortly after the Second Vatican Council by the Dublin architects Peppard & Duffy. The side elevations appear to have been influenced by Coventry Cathedral. The church is a local landmark due to its size, bold inverted ‘V’ entrance and steel openwork spire.

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Kenilworth - St Francis of Assisi

A large red brick town church of the 1990s, a curious hybrid design combining Neo-Romanesque, Scots Baronial and contemporary elements. The light and boldly-handled interior equally combines modern and traditional forms. 

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Kennilworth - St Augustine

A small building built by a member of the Catholic Amherst family and  an early work by A. W. Pugin, one of the leading architects of the English Gothic Revival. It is architecturally modest but retains some fittings designed by Pugin. The additions by Gilbert Blount are also modest but complement Pugin’s work. Blount also designed the presbytery and school building.

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Kidderminster - St Ambrose

A red-brick church of the 1850s in a Gothic Revival style drawing upon motifs of c.1300. It is architecturally plain, lacking carved stone enrichment, but containing some furnishings of note, particularly the stained glass. The (later) spire is of high townscape value. The adjoining presbytery dates from the 1830s, when the predecessor church was built. 

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Kidlington - St Thomas More

A plain post-war church built by the Wakefield firm Lanner Ltd using their characteristic laminated timber arches.

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Kidsgrove - St John the Evangelist

An attractive small late nineteenth-century brick church in Perpendicular Gothic style, by a local architect of regional significance, forming a good group with the adjacent Methodist church and hall. 

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Kineton - St Francis of Assisi

A functional but carefully-detailed design of the 1970s, incorporating furnishings from the predecessor church and occupying a central position in the local conservation area. 

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Kings Heath - St Dunstan

A distinctive and successful design of 1966-8, built to replace an earlier church adjacent (extant and now in non-worship use). The church has high architectural and artistic significance for the dramatic and well-planned worship space, the architect’s careful detailing, use of good quality finishes, and for the integration of artistic elements into the overall design.  

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Kings Norton - St Joseph and St Helen

A late Gothic Revival church built in 1933, to designs by G. B. Cox. The interior has high-quality original and later fittings and furnishings, also designed by Cox.

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Kings Norton - St Paul

A functional church of the 1970s, with an attractive, light-filled interior of laminated timber trusses.

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