Kings Norton - St Paul

A functional church of the 1970s, with an attractive, light-filled interior of laminated timber trusses.

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Kingshurst - St Anthony

An economical but well-detailed church of the mid-1960s, designed to meet the emerging liturgical requirements of the Second Vatican Council and notable for its atmospheric use of top lighting. The external character of the building has been compromised by unsympathetic alterations and additions.  

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Kingshurst - St John the Baptist

A utilitarian design of the 1990s, not of architectural or historical significance. 

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Kingswinford - Our Lady of Lourdes

A brick church of the early 1980s, not of special architectural or historical interest but making a good contribution its neighbourhood. 

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Kitts Green - Our Lady Help of Christians

A building of major significance in the diocese, and nationally, illustrating one architect’s response, highly individual and creative yet driven by the liturgical programme, to post-Vatican II requirements. Richard Gilbert Scott’s T-plan building is a remarkable design, combining modern construction and forms with high quality fittings and artworks, and is very little altered.

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Knutton - Our Lady of Sorrows

A functional brick church-cum-hall of the 1950s. 

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Leamington Spa - St Peter Apostle

A large and handsome town church in the thirteenth century French Gothic style by Henry Clutton, a well-known Catholic architect. The interior is richly furnished. Despite the loss of the pyramidal spire, the church and its tower remain prominent features in the local townscape. The adjoining presbytery is also by Clutton, and contemporary with the church. 

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Leek - St Mary

An impressive late nineteenth-century church based on the architecture of the thirteenth century, whose soaring profile and hillside site give it great presence in the town and conservation area. The interior contains good stained glass by Mayer of Munich and a carved stone altar reredos and pulpit.  

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Lichfield - Holy Cross

Built in 1803 by the Rev. Dr John Kirk (1760-1851), a leading figure in the development of Roman Catholicism in Lichfield. Originally a simple brick box with contemporary adjoining presbytery, the church was remodelled and extended by Joseph Potter (architect of Oscott College) with a well detailed transitional Norman-Gothic stone facade in 1834, increasing the contrast between the church and the late Georgian town house from which it emerges. The interior was extensively reordered in 2003, when a narthex was added to the rear. The most significant elements are the west front, chancel arch, and attached presbytery. The church is a notable landmark on a main approach to the city.

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Lillington - Our Lady

A powerful and expressive centrally planned, concrete-framed building, designed by the local architect Henry Fedeski, and strongly influenced by Gerard Goalen’s church of Our Lady of Fatima, Harlow. Like that church, it incorporates an extensive scheme of brightly-coloured dalle de verre glass designed by Dom Charles Norris of Buckfast Abbey. The building is almost unaltered since its completion in 1963.

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Little Malvern - St Wulstan

A large and striking Gothic church on a dramatic hillside site, designed by Charles Bucknall for the Benedictines. Bucknall’s intended eastern apse was never built and the east end remains roughly finished in brickwork. The interior is handsome but is now plainly decorated, apart from the northeast chapel with its glass and reredos by Hardman and the (later) small octagonal baptistery with its elaborate wall painting. The churchyard is the burial place of Sir Edward Elgar.

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Lower Gornal - St Peter and the English Martyrs

A functional design of the late 1960s incorporating slab in resin glass by the Hardman firm. 

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Malvern - St Joseph

A modest Gothic design of the 1870s, considerably enlarged in the 1990s. Something of the original character of the interior has been preserved, with the original west gallery and reredos, but the finishes and many of the furnishings are modern. There is some good stained glass by Hardman and others.

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Mapledurham House - The Chapel of St Michael the Archangel

Mapledurham, home of the Catholic Blount family, was a notable recusant household. The house retains numerous features and artefacts of penal times. The chapel was built in 1797, soon after the Second Catholic Relief Act of 1791, and is a small building, externally modest, but with a delightful Strawberry Hill Gothick interior, similar to those at Milton Manor, Stonor Park and Bishop Milner’s chapel at Winchester. It contains several paintings and furnishings of historical and artistic importance. 

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Maryvale - Our Lady of the Assumption

A good, fairly late example of the work of the Birmingham architect G. B. Cox, in stripped Romanesque style, its broad west tower incorpo-rating a large statue of Our Lady of the Assumption, by Peter Bohn. The broad and light interior is an attractive space, but original sanctuary furnishings of note have been lost. The church was built to relieve the pressure on the chapel at Maryvale House.

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Maypole - St Jude

A simple post-Vatican II church by Brian A. Rush, using modern materials to provide a spacious, flexible interior to serve the reformed liturgy. 

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Meir - St Augustine of Canterbury

A large 1950s brick church in the stripped Romanesque style that was very popular for Catholic churches up until the Second Vatican Council. It was designed by Sandy & Norris of Stafford, who built widely in the diocese.

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Monks Kirby - St Joseph

A neatly designed small church of 1991-2 by John D. Holmes, the big roof creating a surprisingly spacious interior. 

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Nechells - St Joseph

A cemetery chapel of 1850 and church and presbytery of 1871-2, by A. W. and E. W. Pugin respectively. The church was restored after the war by Giles Gilbert Scott. The large and undulating burial ground, with its monuments, mature planting, historic boundary wall and lychgate make an attractive oasis in an area of post-industrial blight. E. W. Pugin’s school buildings do not survive.  

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New Cross, Wolverhampton - St Patrick

A modern design, externally plain, but with a large square open worship space oversailed by a dramatic suspended ceiling. The church incorporates stained glass from the predecessor church designed by
E. W. Pugin, as well as much new glass. 

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