New Invention - St Edmund Gennings

A functional prefabricated structure, originally built as a parish hall. 

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Newcastle-under-Lyme - Holy Trinity

An individual and idiosyncratic church of 1833-4, designed by the mission priest, who had created a similarly extraordinary church at Ashley some ten years previously. The main front is an early amateur attempt to echo the splendour of Gothic traceried fronts in vitrified blue Staffordshire brick. The side and rear walls are only slightly less elaborate. The interior is also unusual and of considerable interest. The building is a prominent landmark in the local conservation area.

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Northfield - Our Lady and St Brigid

A stripped Italian Romanesque interwar design by E. Bower Norris, with a strong external design and a carefully detailed interior with flat arcading, and decorative metalwork. The sanctuary has lost its original versions, but has been enlivened by a bold neo-baroque mural depicting the Resurrection. 

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Norton-le-Moors - St Mary

A fan-shaped design by Sandy & Norris, the evolution of which reflects the emergence of a new architecture in the light of the liturgical reforms of the Second Vatican Council. The design was pared down as it developed, and the result is an externally plain building, with a warm and welcoming interior space under a boarded timber roof.

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Nuneaton - Our Lady of the Angels

A large aisled red brick church on a cruciform plan with a massive west tower, mainly of 1935-6 but with elements of previous structures including (possibly) part of the J. A. Hansom predecessor church of 1838. A broad nave gives the interior an open and spacious character, and the powerful design of the tower is of townscape value.

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Nuneaton - St Anne

A successful combination of an octagonal church with a longitudinal hall and ancillary facilities on a restricted site, but most interesting for colourful and inventive Aidan McRae Thompson windows of 2002-08.

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Old Oscott Hill - Maryvale Institute for Further and Higher Education

Maryvale is very significant in the history of the Roman Catholic Church in England. It was a mission in the seventeenth century and from 1794 to 1834 the Catholic Seminary for the Midland District. After the building of New Oscott, the house was occupied from 1846 to 1848 by John Henry Newman and fellow converts, when it acquired the name of Maryvale. The main chapel has been in continuous use since the 1770s, and was enlarged in the early nineteenth century by Bishop Milner. The Sacred Heart Chapel, dedicated in 1814, was the first public shrine in England with this dedication.

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Oldbury - St Francis Xavier

A brick-built church of the mid-1960s, of modern construction. It is built to a traditional longitudinal plan, but was designed from the outset with a forward altar, to allow Mass to be said with the priest facing the people. The nave was never completed to the original plan.

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Olton - Holy Ghost and Mary Immaculate

A stately and well-detailed interwar essay in Early Gothic by G. B. Cox, echoing in some respects his earlier church at Acocks Green. The interior spaces are impressive, and retain many early features of note. The original roof was destroyed by a fire in 1970, but was carefully and accurately restored. Adjoining the church is the diocesan seminary, built for Bishop Ullathorne in 1873 from designs by Dunn & Hansom, and now housing a religious community.   

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Outlon - St Mary's Abbey

An important design by E. W. Pugin, built in 1853-4 for an order of Benedictine nuns that came to Oulton from Ghent, via Caverswall Castle. The church was designed early in Pugin’s career, and displays his father’s influence. It contains fine furnishings designed by Hardman, Powell, Pugin and others. With the presbytery and abbey (Oulton House), the church forms an important historic group in an attractive, sheltered setting on the edge of the village

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Oxford - Blessed Dominic Barberi

A large modern church built a few years after the Second Vatican Council. The folded roof and its unusual clerestory of glass pyramids give the building a striking silhouette and make it a local landmark. The dedication commemorates the Italian theologian who received Blessed John Henry Newman into the Catholic Church at the nearby College.

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Oxford - Our Lady Help of Christians

A large post-war church designed by the Irish architect Patrick Sheahan. The church retains most of its original furnishings, including the large reredos with a Crucifixion mosaic.

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Oxford - Priory of the Holy Spirit

A large chapel in a late Gothic style, and a late work by E. Doran Webb. It forms part of a Dominican Priory in the centre of Oxford, which is listed as a fine example of 1920s conventual architecture. The chapel has few furnishings but these are of high quality. 

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Oxford - Sacred Heart

A post-war building built as a dual-purpose church and hall to serve to the Blackbird Leys estate. The intended separate church was never built, and in the early 1980s the interior was subdivided. 

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Oxford - St Aloysius

Oxford’s oldest surviving Catholic church of modern times, built by the Jesuits in the 1870s and replacing a small chapel of 1793. A French Gothic-inspired design by Hansom, it has been embellished over the years, mainly with furnishings by Farmer & Brindley, whose large reredos is of particular note. The parish is now served by the Oratorians.

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Oxford - St Anthony of Padua

A large church of a relatively conventional design for 1959–60, built as a dual-purpose church and hall, with a wide, light-filled interior. The latest reordering included the provision of new sanctuary furnishings by David John. This was the parish church of the writer J.R.R. Tolkien, and the large west crucifix is by the sculptor Faith Tolkien, his daughter-in-law.

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Oxford - St Edmund and St Frideswide

A large neo-Romanesque church by the architect-priest Fr Benedict Williamson. Built for the Jesuits, it is now a parish church and part of the adjoining friary of the Capuchin Franciscans. The church has an austere and serene interior. The whole complex makes a positive contribution to the conservation area and the distinctive tower is a local landmark.

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Oxford - St Gregory and St Augustine

A small Arts and Crafts chapel (designed as a hall to serve a future church) by Ernest Newton, one of his few non-domestic buildings, and his only Catholic church commission. The benefactor was Charles Robertson, a convert to Catholicism, who had employed Newton on other projects. The little chapel was originally intended to be the hall, once a larger church had been built. The interior is largely unaltered.

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Packmoor - St Patrick

A modest red brick church of 1935, of some interest as a design by the parish priest, using voluntary labour for the construction. However, it does not possess architectural significance.

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Penn, Wolverhampton - St Michael

A notable circular design by Desmond Williams & Associates, designed to accommodate post-Vatican II liturgical needs. The church has a number of artworks and furnishings of note, and is little altered. It is an important local landmark.

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