Perry Common - St Margaret Mary

An interwar brick church of traditional form but with modernistic detailing, built to serve a new and expanding suburban housing development. The broad, squat tower is a local landmark.

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Pershore - Holy Redeemer, St Wulstan and St Eadburga

Although architecturally unremarkable, this is a building of considerable significance in the development of the liturgical movement in England, and was recognised as such at the time of its opening. It has been described as ‘a small but significant architectural experiment’ which ‘signalled that the Roman Catholic Church in Britain was open to the possibility of a modern liturgical church architecture’. The church contains specially commissioned artworks and furnishings by Joseph Cribb, John Skelton, Rosamund Fletcher and others.

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Pery Barr - St Teresa of the Child Jesus

A modest church dating originally from the late 1930s, significantly altered and enlarged in the 1960s, with an attractive reordering of 2000.

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Princethorpe - Our Lady of the Angels

A large and conspicuous late Gothic Revival church built for French Benedictine nuns from design by Peter Paul Pugin and opened in 1901.  The church replaced the a smaller 1830s chapel serving St Mary’s Priory, although that chapel survives (altered) amongst the buildings of Princethorpe College. Despite the forbidding red brickwork of the exterior, the church is among Peter Paul Pugin’s richest buildings, with some of his best surviving metalwork and woodwork, along with a full set of stained glass by the Hardman firm and other furnishings of note. 

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Pype Hayes - St Peter and St Paul

A large functional church and presbytery of the early 1970s. The church was designed as a flexible worship space to reflect the new liturgy.

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Quinton - Our Lady of Fatima

A modest post-war suburban church, using modern materials to provide a spacious, flexible interior. 

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Radford - St Augustine

A small plain church of the late 1970s, built as a parish initiative, and notable mainly for its fine stained glass and for a carved Belgian altar of the early nineteenth century. 

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Radford - St Augustine

A small plain church of the late 1970s, built as a parish initiative, and notable mainly for its fine stained glass and for a carved Belgian altar of the early nineteenth century. 

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Redditch - Our Lady and Mount Carmel

A late Georgian sandstone design, built not long after Catholic Emancipation, from designs by the Gothic Revival pioneer Thomas Rickman – his only work for the Catholic Church, and delightfully ‘unarchaeological’. The church underwent unsympathetic reordering after the Second Vatican Council, but recent changes have sought to reinstate more of its historic character. 

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Rednal - Our Lady of Perpetual Succour

A plain but dignified late essay in the modern basilican style by Sandy & Norris.

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Rugby - English Martyrs

The central core of a concrete framed cruciform church built in 1965-6 and altered to its present form in 1978-9. Sadly, the striking original dalle de verre glass by Jonah Jones in the gables has been replaced by plain glazing.

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Rugeley - St Joseph and St Etheldreda

An important example of the work of Charles Hansom, with many original fixtures and good stained glass by Hardman, which has been sympathetically redecorated and restored. With its spire (completed later) the church provides an important local landmark.

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Saltley - Our Lady and St Therese of Lisieux

An interwar basilican design by George Drysdale, externally unremarkable but with an extraordinarily rich interior of marble and mosaic, for which the driving force was the aptly-named parish priest, Mgr John Power. The baldacchino at the east end is based on that in 

Sant’ Ambrogio, Milan. Much of the mosaic decoration post-dates the substantial rebuilding done very quickly after wartime bombing. The tower over the crossing has a carillon of twenty three bells. 

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Sedgley - St Chad and All Saints

One of the oldest churches in the diocese, being a Gothic design of the 1820s, in turn replacing a chapel of 1789. The vaulted sanctuary was considerably enriched in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, but the painted decoration is now lost or covered. The building was remodelled and extended at the (ritual) west end by G. B Cox in
1923-4. With the contemporary (but altered) presbytery, former school buildings and large burial ground, the church belongs to a significant group of Catholic structures reflecting the growth of the mission and parish over a century.

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Selly Park - St Edward

An imposing early twentieth century Gothic Revival suburban church designed by H. T. Sandy and G. B. Cox. The building was erected in three phases as funds became available, but the Gothic style and detailing is consistent, with good-quality finishes, fittings and furnishings. Reordering has been sensitive and the sanctuary retains the 1920s high altar and reredos.

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Sheldon - St Thomas More

A notable reinforced concrete design by Richard Gilbert Scott, built to a fan-shaped plan to serve the needs of the post-Vatican II liturgy. Like Scott’s earlier church at Kitts Green, it has a fine scheme of coloured glass by John Chrestien. 

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Shelfield - St Francis of Assisi

A modestly sized steel framed and brick building of the 1930s, originally planned to serve as a hall for a church which was never built. 

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Shipston-on-Stour - Our Lady and St Michael

A former workhouse chapel in lancet Gothic style, converted to Catholic use in 1979. The mid-nineteenth century chapel is architecturally complete, and has some good carved stone detailing. The internal fittings include a number of items by A. W. Pugin, Charles Hansom and others, brought here from local Catholic centres which have passed out of use.

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Shirley - Our Lady of the Wayside

A striking design of the Post-Vatican II period, the baptistery with its tall needle spire a local landmark. Inside, the main volume of the church is a single impressive space, well detailed and little altered. Its main significance however lies in the quality of its original furnishings and artworks, by Walter Ritchie, Tom Fairs and Elisabeth Frink.  

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Shottery - Our Lady of Peace and Blessed Robert Dibdale

A functional modern worship space combined with a parish hall, of limited architectural interest.

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