Barton-under-Needwood - Our Lady of Perpetual Succour

A traditional longitudinal-planned church of the early 1960s, much altered in 2000. The attached parish hall is approached from a common narthex. The top-lit church interior is now focussed on the sanctuary placed on a long side.

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Bearwood - Our Lady of Good Counsel and St Gregory

A well-detailed and little-altered neo-Georgian design of the 1930s (an unusual choice of style for a Catholic church), notable for the quality of its internal oak and marble furnishings. The architect Philip Chatwin (whose practice was mainly Anglican) was the brother of the parish priest.   

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Bedworth - St Francis of Assisi

A red brick church of various late nineteenth dates. The northwest tower, though not tall, is of value in the townscape and the well-reordered sanctuary has fittings by Carmel Cauchi of a consistently high standard.

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Bewdley - Holy Family

A delightful late eighteenth-century building with a long and varied history, having passed through several denominations and secular use before being rescued and adapted for Roman Catholic use in the 1950s. The building is apsidal at either end, and retains a gallery at one end. It makes a notable and positive contribution to the Bewdley Conservation Area. 

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Bicester - Immaculate Conception

An early architectural work by Desmond Williams, completed in 1963 and still displaying the influence of his mentor Arthur Farebrother. The design is a modern version of Gothic, a character reflected particularly in the internal volumes and forms. The external treatment is plainer, with the massing of traditional form, and was designed deliberately to be deferential to its historic context. The tower forms a landmark in the conservation area.

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Biddulph - English Martyrs

A modest dual-purpose structure of the 1950s, significantly enlarged in sympathetic style in 2000.

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Bidford - St Joseph the Worker

A functional church/hall converted in the early 1960s from a builders’ workshop.

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Bilston - Holy Trinity

A Gothic-style church built in the early years after Catholic Emancipation, with a chancel of 1846 by A.W. Pugin. The church was remodelled by G. B. Cox in the 1920s, adding a degree of architectural modulation to the previously plain Gothic design. The church forms an attractive grouping with the adjacent and stylistically very different school buildings of the 1890s. However, the external appearance of the buildings has been marred by the demolition of the attached presbytery and by the associated application of render.  

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Birmingham - St Chad's Cathedral

The Cathedral Church of the Archdiocese of Birmingham, and a major early work by A. W. Pugin. The church was built by Bishop Walsh, Vicar Apostolic of the Western District, replacing an early nineteenth century building which had ceased to meet the needs and aspirations of the growing Catholic population of the city. The cathedral houses the shrine of St Chad, whose relics were discovered at the time of its construction. The church was elevated to cathedral status in 1850 and became a minor basilica in 1941. It is brick built, in a German Gothic style, and contains important furnishings designed by, or provided by, the Sixteenth Earl of Shrewsbury, the Hardman family and Pugin himself. Pugin’s Bishop’s House was demolished in 1959 to make way for the inner ring road, a major loss to the city. 1960s reordering resulted in the loss of Pugin’s rood screen and other unsympathetic alterations, but more recent schemes of redecoration and reordering have reinstated something of the colour and character of Pugin’s interior. 

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Birmingham - St Michael

A former Unitarian chapel of 1802, in Catholic use since 1862, unsympathetically remodelled in the 1970s and again refitted in 2012-13. This inner city church is in active daily use, and is the church of the city’s Polish community. The building replaced a predecessor chapel of 1725, and lies close to the site of the first post-Reformation Catholic church in Birmingham.

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Birmingham - St Patrick

A large red brick Gothic church of the 1890s, of high townscape value but notable above all for the quality and richness of its internal fitting out. The church occupies an urban site opposite the city hospital. 

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Blackheath - English Martyrs

A functional brick-built church/hall of 1960-61, typical of its time and not of special architectural or historical interest.

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Blackmore Park - St Alphonsus

An elaborate mid-nineteenth century Gothic Revival church, built for the Redemptorist order by John Vincent Gandolfi on the edge of his country estate, and designed by Charles Hansom with the active assistance of Bishop Ullathorne. Its design is based on the mid-thirteenth century church at Skelton, Yorkshire. The interior is richly fitted, with fittings by A. W. Pugin, who is also credited with the design of the lychgate. Hansom’s former monastery, attached to the church, is now a private house.

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Bloxwich - St Peter

A mid-Victorian brick Gothic Revival church, T. R. Donnelly’s first church design in the diocese. The building was substantially altered and extended in the 1950s, with a new west front and towers. This frontage makes a prominent contribution to the Bloxwich Conservation Area.

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Brailes - St Peter and Paul

A building of national significance. Formed in 1726 within the upper space of a late medieval malt barn, the chapel has some claim to be the oldest post-Reformation place of public Catholic worship in the country, preceding the legalisation of church building by some 65 years. It retains many of its early Georgian fittings and an important collection of historic vestments and liturgical furnishings. The building is attached to a grade II* farmhouse (now in separate ownership) and with its adjoining presbytery occupies a picturesque location within the Brailes Conservation Area. 

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Brewood - St Mary

A church by A. W. Pugin which is largely unaltered externally and part of a group of buildings erected to Pugin’s designs by the builder George Myers. It retains a number of good original fittings including the high altar, reredos, font, sedile and piscina and brass memorials of high quality. As a group the buildings reflect Pugin’s aspiration to create a small rural Catholic enclave. 

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Brierley Hill - St Mary

A mid-Victorian brick church in a freely treated thirteenth century style, and a late work by E. W. Pugin. The best feature of the interior is the painted timber reredos, but otherwise many historic furnishings have been lost. The church occupies a prominent position in the Brierley Hill High Street Conservation Area.

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Broadway - St Saviour

A small chapel of considerable historic interest. Originally built as a chapel for a Benedictine community around the time of Catholic Emancipation, both monastery and chapel were taken over by the Passionists in 1850, when alterations to the chapel were carried out, possibly by Charles Hansom. The interior decoration was simplified in the twentieth century but much original and early fabric remains. The Passionists left in 2000 and the former monastery and retreat house have been converted to flats.  

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Bromsgrove - St Peter

A High Victorian church of some distinction by a well-known Catholic architect, in the manner of E. W. Pugin and incorporating important furnishings by A. W. N. Pugin from Alton Towers. The interior is little-altered. The church has historical associations with Sir Edward Elgar.

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Brownhill - St Bernadette

A red-brick modern single-space church in a large green space that has some architectural presence towards the busy High Street.

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