Stoke on Trent - Sacred Heart

A large and handsome late nineteenth century church, set among a dense grid of streets near the centre of Hanley.  It has a fine interior of considerable quality and lavishness. The church, substantial presbytery and a former school building (now the parish centre) fill the whole of a street block and constitute a major presence in the area.

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Stoke on Trent - St George and St Martin -

An attractive interwar design in the Early Christian basilican style, with some good furnishings. The church is a fairly early work by the prolific Catholic architect E. Bower Norris and lacks the more archaeologically correct character of some of his other basilican designs. The building is located on a ridge amidst dense nineteenth-century terraces and makes a positive contribution to the local scene. 

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Stoke-on-Trent - Our Lady of the Angels and St Peter in Chains

A large and conspicuous building designed by Charles Hansom, one of the most original of mid-nineteenth century Catholic architects. The church and presbytery with their vigorously banded brick walls form part of a larger composition with the former convent and have considerable landscape value on a prominent site overlooking Stoke. The interior contains good furnishings by the Hardman firm and others.

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Stoke-on-Trent - St Gregory

A post-Vatican II town centre church, its design owing something to the influence of Francis Pollen and Maguire & Murray. The church has a large semi-circular central worship space with the presbytery and other spaces radiating off it. It replaced an earlier church designed by E.W. Pugin.

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Stone - Immaculate Conception and St Dominic

A large and complex church of strong architectural character and interest. It forms the heart of a group of listed and unlisted buildings which form a historically interesting and important ensemble. Of these, the chapel of St Anne is an important early work of A. W. Pugin, associated with the mission of Blessed Dominic Barberi. The building of the present church and convent was conceived by Mother Margaret Hallahan, founder of the Dominican Congregation of St Catherine of Siena. The church is a fine Gothic Revival design by Charles Hansom and Gilbert Blount, two major Catholic architects of the nineteenth century, and is the burial place of Bishop William Bernard Ullathorne, a significant figure in nineteenth century Midlands Catholicism. 

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Stourbridge - Our Lady and All Saints

An impressive mid-Victorian Gothic Revival church by a major Catholic architect. There is a good survival of the Victorian fittings and fixtures. With its later tower and spire, the church forms a significant local landmark. The adjoining Gothic presbytery is also of architectural and townscape value.  

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Stourport-on-Severn - St Wulstan and St Thomas

A functional 1970s steel-framed and brick church with a large, square worship space.

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Stratford-upon-Avon - St Gregory the Great

A relatively small church Gothic church of the 1860s by E. W. Pugin, whose buildings are often more flamboyant. The interior is contrived to appear longer than it is in fact by the use of narrow arcades. The west end was completely rebuilt in the 1950s, with altered detailing and a new narthex. Most of the original fittings survive. The building is prominent in the local conservation area. 

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Streetly - St Anne

The narrow facade conceals a surprisingly spacious if simple interior. The lack of an architectural sanctuary is explained by its original dual function as a church hall; social uses now occupy a west narthex and sizeable underground spaces below the sanctuary. 

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Studley - St Mary

A well-detailed Victorian Gothic Revival church built for a Benedictine mission, with assistance from the Throckmorton family of Coughton Court. Although altered, the church retains a number of original and early fixtures and fittings of note. With the adjoining slightly later presbytery, it has a fine presence on a large site beside the main road leading south out of Studley. 

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Sutton Coldfield - Holy Trinity

A stately and in parts quirky interwar Romanesque design by G. B. Cox, replacing a smaller chapel of 1834. The interior has an unusual coffered ceiling, and the west tower makes a strong and positive contribution to the local conservation area.

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Sutton Coldfield - St Nicholas

An economical post-war brick church in a simplified Romanesque style with an unassuming exterior and a more impressive interior of hall church character.

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Swynnerton - Our Lady of the Assumption

A sumptuously-appointed family chapel with many rich original furnishings. The building is notable for the quality of the architecture and fixtures and for its historical associations with the Fitzherbert family and Swynnerton Hall, with which the chapel has group value.  

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Tamworth - Sacred Heart

A large complex typical of its 1979 date that includes all the facilities a modern parish church needs, but with little architectural distinction.

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Tamworth - St John the Baptist

A large neoclassical town church of 1829-30 by Joseph Potter (architect of St Mary’s College, Oscott), which was remodelled and extended and given a distinctly post-War character in 1954. The building is more of historical interest as an ambitious town church of the time of Catholic Emancipation than for its heavily compromised architectural qualities, although it does have a strong presence in the Conservation Area.

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Tean - St Thomas of Canterbury

A brick church of the late 1930s by a local firm of architects. It is of a distinctive and unusual, angular design with passage aisles, and contains some furnishings of note, including items from Cotton College and church.

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Tenbury Wells - Sacred Heart and Our Lady

A small, compact modern building accommodating both a worship space and a meeting room. Whilst a pleasing and functional design, it is not a building of heritage significance.

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Tettenhall - St Thomas of Canterbury

A modern brick-faced church with an external design of powerful geometry, and a softer and pleasing interior. It was built in the mid-1960s at the time of the Second Vatican Council, and was forward-looking in its liturgical arrangements. Perhaps as a consequence, it is little altered. The design of the church is in marked contrast with that of the former presbytery, a timber framed building of sixteenth or early seventeenth century date. 

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Thame - St Joseph

One of the newer churches in the diocese, of traditional design, with a large, well-lit interior and furnishings and stained glass of some quality. 

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Tipton - Sacred Heart and Holy Souls

A traditionally planned, plain, passage-aisled brick church in stripped Romanesque style, opened at the start of the Second World War. It has a fine carved figure of the Sacred Heart on the west front.

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