Stourport-on-Severn - St Wulstan and St Thomas

A functional 1970s steel-framed and brick church with a large, square worship space.

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Stratford-upon-Avon - St Gregory the Great

A relatively small church Gothic church of the 1860s by E. W. Pugin, whose buildings are often more flamboyant. The interior is contrived to appear longer than it is in fact by the use of narrow arcades. The west end was completely rebuilt in the 1950s, with altered detailing and a new narthex. Most of the original fittings survive. The building is prominent in the local conservation area. 

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Streetly - St Anne

The narrow facade conceals a surprisingly spacious if simple interior. The lack of an architectural sanctuary is explained by its original dual function as a church hall; social uses now occupy a west narthex and sizeable underground spaces below the sanctuary. 

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Studley - St Mary

A well-detailed Victorian Gothic Revival church built for a Benedictine mission, with assistance from the Throckmorton family of Coughton Court. Although altered, the church retains a number of original and early fixtures and fittings of note. With the adjoining slightly later presbytery, it has a fine presence on a large site beside the main road leading south out of Studley. 

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Sutton Coldfield - Holy Trinity

A stately and in parts quirky interwar Romanesque design by G. B. Cox, replacing a smaller chapel of 1834. The interior has an unusual coffered ceiling, and the west tower makes a strong and positive contribution to the local conservation area.

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Sutton Coldfield - St Nicholas

An economical post-war brick church in a simplified Romanesque style with an unassuming exterior and a more impressive interior of hall church character.

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Swynnerton - Our Lady of the Assumption

A sumptuously-appointed family chapel with many rich original furnishings. The building is notable for the quality of the architecture and fixtures and for its historical associations with the Fitzherbert family and Swynnerton Hall, with which the chapel has group value.  

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Tamworth - Sacred Heart

A large complex typical of its 1979 date that includes all the facilities a modern parish church needs, but with little architectural distinction.

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Tamworth - St John the Baptist

A large neoclassical town church of 1829-30 by Joseph Potter (architect of St Mary’s College, Oscott), which was remodelled and extended and given a distinctly post-War character in 1954. The building is more of historical interest as an ambitious town church of the time of Catholic Emancipation than for its heavily compromised architectural qualities, although it does have a strong presence in the Conservation Area.

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Tean - St Thomas of Canterbury

A brick church of the late 1930s by a local firm of architects. It is of a distinctive and unusual, angular design with passage aisles, and contains some furnishings of note, including items from Cotton College and church.

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Tettenhall - St Thomas of Canterbury

A modern brick-faced church with an external design of powerful geometry, and a softer and pleasing interior. It was built in the mid-1960s at the time of the Second Vatican Council, and was forward-looking in its liturgical arrangements. Perhaps as a consequence, it is little altered. The design of the church is in marked contrast with that of the former presbytery, a timber framed building of sixteenth or early seventeenth century date. 

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Thame - St Joseph

One of the newer churches in the diocese, of traditional design, with a large, well-lit interior and furnishings and stained glass of some quality. 

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Tipton - Sacred Heart and Holy Souls

A traditionally planned, plain, passage-aisled brick church in stripped Romanesque style, opened at the start of the Second World War. It has a fine carved figure of the Sacred Heart on the west front.

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Tunstall - Sacred Heart

A large, unusual and impressive essay in the Romanesque style of south west France, the green copper-clad domes forming a major local landmark. The original architect was the noted Arts and Crafts figure J. Sydney Brocklesby, with the parish priest acting as clerk of works and using unemployed parishioners for much of the labour, including some of the furnishings. The church also contains furnishings acquired abroad by the parish priest. 

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Tutbury - St Christopher

A modest single-space building of 1960 which continues to meet the needs of its congregation. 

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Upton-upon-Severn - St Joseph

A modest Gothic church of 1850 by Charles Hansom, established by the Redemptorists and paid for in part by John Vincent Hornyold of Blackmore Park, who also financed Hansom’s more ambitious church for the Redemptorists on the edge of his estate. The church and attached presbytery make a modest but positive contribution to the conservation area. 

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Uttoxeter - St Mary

 An early church by A. W. Pugin, built with the support of the Earl of Shrewsbury, and of historical importance in the Catholic and Gothic Revivals, described by Pugin as England’s first post-Reformation Catholic church built ‘in strict accordance with the rules of ancient ecclesiastical architecture’. The building has been greatly altered and enlarged, but elements of the original building survive, in situ or in some cases repositioned. The later additions, by P. P. Pugin and Henry Sandy, are of some architectural quality and interest in their own right. The church contains good stained glass by Paul Woodroffe, Mayer and others. With the attached presbytery (also by Pugin, but altered and extended) it forms part of a group which makes a notable contribution to the Uttoxeter Conservation Area.

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Walmley - Holy Cross and St Francis

A functional modern church of the mid-1970s retaining much of its original character.

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Walsall - St Catherine with St Chad

A church built in the early 1960s to serve a post-war housing estate. Although not of special architectural interest, its octagonal plan form is an early example in the diocese of the departure from the traditional longitudinal plan. The interior has now been split in two, and the building is shared with the local Anglican congregation. 

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Walsall - St Mary

An important building from the early days of the revival of Catholic church building in the West Midlands. It is a fine, chaste neoclassical structure reflecting the taste of the 1820s before the prevailing of Gothic orthodoxy in the late 1830s and early 1840s. The church and its adjoining almost contemporary presbytery are prominent features on a rising site in the Bradford Street Conservation Area. 

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