Walsall - St Patrick

A post-Vatican II urban church with a strong design, clearly influenced by Spence’s cathedral at Coventry, but departing from that building’s longitudinal form in favour of a trapezoidal plan. The building is very little altered, and retains original and later furnishings of note. 

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Walsall - St Thomas of Canterbury

A traditionally-planned brick church of 1959-60, built to serve a housing estate. It has simple, elegant lines and its tall campanile is a local landmark. 

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Wappenbury - St Anne

A small and plain mid-nineteenth Gothic structure of some charm, possibly incorporating fabric from the predecessor church. The church has a large burial ground, adjoining the medieval church and churchyard, which forms part of the setting of the Iron Age hill fort of Wappenbury Camp.

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Warley - Our Lady and St Hubert

A large brick basilican interwar church by George Drysdale, partner of Leonard Stokes, and occupying a landmark position on the arterial road between Birmingham and Wolverhampton. The church is well-detailed and relatively little-altered, with good low-relief carved panels on the west front and a strong, harmonious interior held together by the generous use of Hornton stone for the facings and fittings. 

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Warndon - St Joseph

A plain building of the mid-1970s, designed as a church hall, serving a postwar housing estate.

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Warwick - St Joseph

An inventive small modern church by Brian Rush, with sheer curving brick walls for external effect and an interior made atmospheric by diffused and directional natural light. More recently a parish centre has been built across the west end of the church.

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Warwick - St Mary Immaculate

A small but strikingly tall red brick church in an elaborate English Decorated Gothic style typical of its architect, E. W. Pugin. ‘Here (Pugin) solved the problem of the reconciling of the Gothic style with the Tridentine liturgy’ (O’Donnell). The interior has been reordered and redecorated but still retains much of its original character, and a complete set of contemporary stained glass.  

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Watlington -- St Edmund Campion

A modern church of cruciform plan, attractively fitted out. 

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Weoley Castle - Our Lady and St Rose of Lima

A large and imposing traditional post-war design and late work by Adrian Gilbert Scott, occupying a prominent location in a formal planned suburb. The design, which displays Scott’s trademark camel-vaulted arches, has good-quality finishes both inside and out, and is relatively little altered. 

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West Adderbury - St George

A utilitarian structure of the 1950s, now closed for worship. The church contains rood figures from St John the Evangelist, Banbury, which are probably by A. W. Pugin. The site lies within the Adderbury Conservation Area.

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West Bromwich - Holy Cross

A large late 1960s church of angular design, with a bold top-lit ‘crossing’ housing the sanctuary, and spacious transepts. The design bears several fashionable hallmarks of the time, but is somewhat crude in its massing and execution.

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West Bromwich - St Joseph

A modest late 1950s church-hall built on a low budget for a post-war housing estate. 

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West Bromwich - St Michael and Holy Angels

A substantial red brick church in the Early English style, built in two phases from designs by two notable Catholic church architects, and typical of many urban churches of its time. The interior is relatively little altered, but is unremarkable for its date; the chief interest of the building lies in its prominent townscape contribution in the West Bromwich High Street Conservation Area. 

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West Heath - St John Fisher

A monumental traditional design, dominating the suburban setting it serves. The church is a late (1963-4) design by Ernest Bower Norris and was described by him as ‘a modern interpretation of the Romanesque style’. It is little altered, and retains good quality furnishings and dalle de verre glass by Norris’s collaborator Jonah Jones, more modern in character than the architecture, yet both work together to produce a harmonious effect. 

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Wheatley - Our Lady of Lourdes

A former tithe barn sympathetically converted for use as a church in the 1960s, with a recent porch extension. It forms part of the setting of the listed farm house, Rectory House, and lies in a conservation area. 

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Willenhall - St Mary

A small Edwardian red brick Early English Gothic design, and a modest example of the work of a well-known firm of Catholic architects of the early twentieth century. The church replaced one by E. W. Pugin. 

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Witney - Our Lady and St Hugh

A plain brick 1970s design in a suburban location, distinguished by its raised tower over the sanctuary.

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Wolstanton - St Wulstan

A plain brick structure built in the late 1950s on a longitudinal plan, designed without aisles to maximise the congregation’s view of the sanctuary, and in a diluted version of the round-arched style so popular for Catholic churches in the years up to the Second Vatican Council. 

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Wolverhampton - Corpus Christi

A modern brick church of 1991 arranged on standard post-Vatican II lines. The exterior is unexceptional but the interior reveals an interesting plan of some architectural imagination.

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Wolverhampton - Our Lady of Perpetual Succour

A striking interwar brick design by Sandy & Norris, with a showpiece frontage fusing modern Romanesque and Art Deco elements, and a basilican interior of austere gravity. The church occupies a prominent position facing a roundabout on a major road leading north out of Wolverhampton.

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