West Bromwich - St Michael and Holy Angels

A substantial red brick church in the Early English style, built in two phases from designs by two notable Catholic church architects, and typical of many urban churches of its time. The interior is relatively little altered, but is unremarkable for its date; the chief interest of the building lies in its prominent townscape contribution in the West Bromwich High Street Conservation Area. 

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West Heath - St John Fisher

A monumental traditional design, dominating the suburban setting it serves. The church is a late (1963-4) design by Ernest Bower Norris and was described by him as ‘a modern interpretation of the Romanesque style’. It is little altered, and retains good quality furnishings and dalle de verre glass by Norris’s collaborator Jonah Jones, more modern in character than the architecture, yet both work together to produce a harmonious effect. 

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Wheatley - Our Lady of Lourdes

A former tithe barn sympathetically converted for use as a church in the 1960s, with a recent porch extension. It forms part of the setting of the listed farm house, Rectory House, and lies in a conservation area. 

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Willenhall - St Mary

A small Edwardian red brick Early English Gothic design, and a modest example of the work of a well-known firm of Catholic architects of the early twentieth century. The church replaced one by E. W. Pugin. 

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Witney - Our Lady and St Hugh

A plain brick 1970s design in a suburban location, distinguished by its raised tower over the sanctuary.

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Wolstanton - St Wulstan

A plain brick structure built in the late 1950s on a longitudinal plan, designed without aisles to maximise the congregation’s view of the sanctuary, and in a diluted version of the round-arched style so popular for Catholic churches in the years up to the Second Vatican Council. 

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Wolverhampton - Corpus Christi

A modern brick church of 1991 arranged on standard post-Vatican II lines. The exterior is unexceptional but the interior reveals an interesting plan of some architectural imagination.

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Wolverhampton - Our Lady of Perpetual Succour

A striking interwar brick design by Sandy & Norris, with a showpiece frontage fusing modern Romanesque and Art Deco elements, and a basilican interior of austere gravity. The church occupies a prominent position facing a roundabout on a major road leading north out of Wolverhampton.

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Wolverhampton - St Joseph

One of Jennings, Homer & Lynch’s more notable church designs in the diocese, with a fan-shaped plan designed to accommodate the needs of the post-Vatican II liturgy. Outwardly this is a fairly conventional piece of 1960s church design, but the internal space is particularly impressive and spacious, rising under a timber ceiling to the sanctuary. The church is little altered and retains some notable furnishings. 

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Wolverhampton - St Teresa of the Infant Jesus

A church of the late 1960s, of brick and concrete construction, with an angular appearance and a large, open worship space.

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Wolverhampton -St Peter and St Paul

A highly important church in the history of Midlands Catholicism. It adjoins the early eighteenth century Giffard House, home of the Vicars Apostolic of the Midland District, including Bishop Milner, in whose memory the church was built, and who lies buried in the crypt. It is a major neo-classical design by Joseph Ireland, and underwent an exemplary reordering in 2009. With Giffard House it occupies a prominent position in the city centre conservation area. 

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Wolverhapmton - St Anthony of Padua

A modern brick church with a broad, fan-shaped plan on post-Vatican II lines.

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Womborne - St Bernadette

A functional hall-church building of 1961, built to serve an expanding commuter village. 

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Woodcote - Christ the King

A big, barn-like timber structure built in the 1960s without the involvement of an architect. It occupies a large site, intended for a parish complex. There are no furnishings of particular note. 

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Woodlane - St Francis de Sales

An interesting rural example of a post-1791 T-plan church and house, the church extended to a cruciform plan in 1830s Gothic style. The interior has lost many of its old fittings, but remains an evocative space. An older dwelling and stable/coach house form part of the setting.

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Woodstock - St Hugh of Lincoln

An interwar church in Tudor Gothic Revival style, built shortly after the founding of the parish. The planned sanctuary was never built. Although modest in scale, the church and lychgate make a positive contribution to the local townscape.

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Wooton Wawen - Our Lady and St Benedict

The Catholic mission of Wootton Wawen is one of the oldest in England and for many years after 1677 Jesuit priests were chaplains to the Carrington family. The present church is a modest early twentieth century brick design, built as a replacement for the early nineteenth century chapel in Wootton Hall. The building has a varied and interesting collection of fittings, some brought from the earlier chapel and others (such as the fine reredos by A. H. Skipworth) from elsewhere.

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Worcester - Our Lady Queen of Peace

A simple church of 1950, intended as ‘semi-permanent’, and with a vaguely Spanish-style brick gable at the front. The building was refurbished in the 1980s and a striking narthex added in 2003.

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Worcester - St George

There has been a Catholic church in Worcester on or near the present site since the 1740s. The present building was built about the time of Catholic Emancipation, from designs by Henry Rowe. A large copy of Raphael’s Transfiguration was given by the Sixteenth Earl of Shrewsbury. The church was refronted and richly refitted in the late 1870s and 1880s. Worcester has a long association with the Society of Jesus, who built the church and had care of the parish until 1990. Sir Edward Elgar was organist here in the 1880s. With the historic lamp standards at the front and adjoining presbytery, the church makes a notable contribution to the city centre conservation area.  

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Wroxton - St Thomas of Canterbury

The only thatched church in the diocese. Its current appearance largely the result of a 1948 remodelling, this is a small building of considerable charm and character, which makes a positive contribution to the local conservation area. It houses a notable collection of nineteenth century stained glass salvaged from other buildings.

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