Brownhill - St Bernadette

A red-brick modern single-space church in a large green space that has some architectural presence towards the busy High Street.

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Bulkington - Our Lady of the Sacred Heart

A modest 1869 brick church with stone detailing reminiscent of William Burges and with excellent stained glass by W. Gualbert Saunders, architect of the church (who worked with Burges). 

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Burntwood - St Joseph

This complex by John D. Holmes is typical of its time and decently constructed of modern materials, re-using the large round stone tracery window and incorporating some furnishings from the predecessor church by G. H. Cox. 

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Burslem - St Joseph

An ambitious Italian Romanesque design of the 1920s by J. S. Brocklesby. Much of the interior decoration was carried out by local volunteers under the supervision of Gordon Forsyth, director of the local School of Art. The painting of Christ Pantocrator in the apse is a fine work by Moira Forsyth. The church is an important local landmark in an area of deprivation. 

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Burton-on-Trent - St Mary and St Modwen

A landmark brick building on the edge of the town centre, its tall tower topped by a short stone spire prominent along Guild Street. The interior is a noble space with good quality decoration and furnishings by local artists as well as more widely known practices such as Boulton of Cheltenham and Mayer of Munich.

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Cannock - St Mary

A plain interwar basilican design by Sandy & Norris, with a simple, dignified interior, but not of special architectural or historical interest.

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Carterton - St Joseph

An L-shaped complex of two former Cotswold barns dating from the late eighteenth or early nineteenth century, used since the 1930s as a church and hall. The primary heritage significance of the buildings lies in their original use as stone-built agricultural structures, but the current use is sympathetic, retaining the simple and open character of the interiors.  

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Castle Bromwich - Mother of God and Guardian Angels

An economical but stylish design from a time of austerity, the church was built in the early 1950s to serve a new residential area. The external character might be described as a stylistic fusion of Art Deco and Modern Gothic. Inside, the church is a wide, flexible space under segmental ceilings, with solid furnishings of good quality.  

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Castle Bromwich - St Wildfrid

A large and impressive design of the mid-1960s, displaying popular motifs of church design of that time, and in particular echoing Coventry Cathedral in its traditional longitudinal form, staggered window arrangement, and use of large figurative sculpture applied to plain brickwork. The tall campanile is a local landmark.  

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Castle Vale - St Gerard

A church of the 1980s, with a striking fortress-like exterior and a more recent freestanding glass campanile, something of a local landmark in an area of public housing on the site of a wartime airfield.

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Cavensham - Our Lady and St Anne

A Gothic Revival suburban parish church by Canon A. J. C. Scoles, completed in stages over thirty years. A shrine to Our Lady of Caversham was added in the 1950s in a contrasting Romanesque idiom, using stone donated in the 1920s from a medieval bridge chapel.

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Caverswall - St Filumena

A small, aisleless Gothic Revival church of the 1860s by a distinguished Catholic architect. It occupies a prominent position within the village conservation area.

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Charlbury - St Terese of Lisieux

A small, plain, stone-built mid-nineteenth century chapel, built for the Primitive Methodists and acquired for Catholic use in 1931. It has recently (2000) been sympathetically extended. The church and its setting make a positive contribution to the local conservation area.

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Cheadle - St Giles

One of A. W. Pugin’s greatest achievements and the pinnacle of his work for the Sixteenth Earl of Shrewsbury. The church stands as a symbol of the Catholic and Gothic revivals in early Victorian Britain. With the adjoining school, convent, churchyard and boundary features, it forms part of a historic complex at the centre of the conservation area. The church is very little altered and is, quite simply, one of the most important built in nineteenth century Britain.

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Chelmsley Wood - St Anne

A late design of 1988 by Cyril Horsley, simple in character, but given some external presence by the octagonal top-lit sanctuary. 

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Chesterton - St John the Evangelist

A small and functional polygonal building of 1980 with exposed laminated trusses. 

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Chipping Norton - Holy Trinity

A notable neoclassical design of the 1830s by J. M. Derick, in marked contrast to the architect’s slightly later Gothic design for St Mary, Banbury. The building was sympathetically enlarged and adapted in the 1880s. The original design showed some Soanian influence, but this was sadly compromised in the 1960s by the loss of the bell tower and vaulted ceilings. A more recent reordering has sought to reinstate some of the historic character of the interior. Amongst the furnishings, the church contains a Gothic altar from the former chapel at Heythrop House. With its large burial ground, handsome Georgian presbytery and late nineteenth-century former convent-school building, the church forms part of an important ensemble of historic buildings on the London Road.

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Clayton - Our Lady and St Werburgh

A late 1950s multi-purpose building, later substantially extended. While not of architectural or historical significance, the reworking of the interior provides a welcoming and pleasing worship space.

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Codsall - St Christopher

One of the more recent churches in the diocese, carefully designed on a compact scale and with interesting visual features. 

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Coleshill - Sacred Heart

A church of almost cathedral proportions, built at the beginning of the Second World War from designs by G. B. Cox. The neo-Byzantine/ Romanesque building is notable for the quality of its marble fittings, stained glass and other furnishings. It is the centrepiece and culmination of an early twentieth century ‘garden city campus’ for Fr Hudson’s Homes, now somewhat depleted, but nevertheless remaining a dominant feature in this part of the conservation area. 

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