Dorridge - St George and St Teresa

A simple Gothic brick church of the 1930s, enlarged and liturgically reorientated in the 1970s. The reordered interior is an attractive and welcoming space, with some furnishings of note. 

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Droitwich - Sacred Heart and St Catherine

An impressive Early Christian basilican-style brick church dating from the early interwar years, made exceptional by its rich internal fitting out, notably the superb mosaic decoration by Gabriel Pippet. 

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Dudley - Our Blessed Lady and St Thomas of Canterbury

An early and economically-built Gothic Revival design by A. W. Pugin, his first to be furnished with a rood screen (later removed). The church underwent a major and damaging reordering in the 1960s.

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Eccleshall - Sacred Heart

A plain early twentieth century church of Gothic Arts and Crafts character, designed to serve a religious community as well as the local Catholic population. The church has historical associations with the Fitzherbert family of Swynnerton Hall, who paid for it. The relatively plain interior was adorned in the 1920s with wall paintings by Dom Constantine Bosschaerts (a pioneer of Catholic liturgical reform), but these have been largely removed or obscured. 

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Edgbaston - Oratory Church of the Immaculate Conception

A Roman basilican design of the first decade of the twentieth century, built as a memorial to Cardinal (Blessed) John Henry Newman, who lived here for nearly forty years. The interior is richly fitted out in marble and mosaic, with imported items as well as purpose-designed furnishings by J. H. Pollen, Dunstan Powell, Nathaniel Westlake and others. It contains elements from the previous church, and with Oratory House and Henry Clutton’s school hall forms part of an important historic group on one of the principal approaches to the city centre. 

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Erdington Abbey - St Thomas and St Edmund

An elaborate and richly decorated mid-nineteenth century church in fourteenth century Gothic style, funded entirely by the Rev. Daniel Haigh, a wealthy convert who was one of the first incumbents.  The church was designed by Charles Hansom, a well-known Catholic architect, and has fine furnishings, including an elaborate oak reredos of 1897. The stone rood screen did not survive post-Vatican II reordering. With its tall broach spite and associated former abbey buildings, the church is an important local landmark. 

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Evesham - St Mary and St Egwin

An early twentieth century Gothic church by Pugin & Pugin with many of the characteristic features of that firm (tall steeply-pitched roofs, cross-gabled side aisles, elaborate window tracery, dramatic altar compositions). The interior retains most of its original fittings.

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Eynsham - St Peter

Started in 1940 by Fr John Lopes as a Romanesque basilica, the church was completed in 1966-7 by the same architect in a more modern style.
Fr John Tolkien, son of J.R.R. Tolkien, was parish priest here and helped build the parish hall. The church and churchyard occupy part of the site of the medieval Eynsham Abbey (a scheduled Ancient Monument).

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Feckenham - St John Fisher and St Thomas More

A functional dual-purpose brick building from the 1930s, not of architectural or historical interest, but with a welcoming interior and sense of intimacy.

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Fegg Hayes - St Bernadette

A functional building designed as a dual purpose church-hall, in an area of postwar housing. 

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Fenton - Our Lady of Perpetual Succour

A plain early design by Sandy & Norris, with a pleasing interior. 

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Four Oaks - Sacred Heart

A modern church by Cyril Horsley with bold brick outlines, built on an open suburban site. The chief internal feature of note is a large bronze resin sculpture by Faith Tolkien.

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Goldenhill - St Joseph

A 1950s suburban red brick church, built to a limited budget. The interior is unusual with its plain arches and characterful brick-faced piers but overall it is of limited architectural or heritage significance. The nineteenth century statuary in the Lady Chapel is of some interest.

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Goring-on-Thames - Our Lady and St John

A small Arts and Crafts Gothic village church built on land donated by William Brown Hallett. Designed by the architect William Ravenscroft of Reading (better known for his Domestic Revival houses), the church was built in two phases, forty years apart, but nevertheless displays an architectural unity. The interior is little altered and retains its original timber high altar. The tower is a local landmark.

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Gravelly Hill - St Mary and St John

A large interwar church with a wide and lofty interior, the striking post-war addition of a tall west bell tower by G. B. Cox forming a landmark on the Birmingham to Lichfield road.

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Great Barr - Holy Name of Jesus

A brick church of 1938, built from designs by E. Bower Norris to serve the expanding area of Great Barr. It is stylistically fairly simple but the west end fronting the main road has interesting Art Deco features which give the church some presence in the suburban townscape. The aisles, added in 1957, are in keeping with the original design. The interior is generally plain in character and contains no furnishings of special note.

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Great Haywood - St John the Baptist

A country house chapel of the 1820s which was rebuilt in its current location in the 1840s, and as such has been described as ‘a striking example of physical continuity between country house Catholicism and a nineteenth century parish’. The church is of considerable historical and architectural interest, displaying an exceptional grasp of Perpendicular style for the period and representing an important work by the architect Joseph Ireland, several of whose other buildings have been demolished. 

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Habberley - Our Lady and St Pius

A large, buff-brick church built to serve a post-war housing estate on the western outskirts of Kidderminster. Although opened in 1970 it employs a traditional longitudinal plan, and is more redolent of the church architecture of the 1950s than the post-Vatican II years.  The building has a landmark presence in an area otherwise lacking in architectural highlights.

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Hadzor - St Richard and St Hubert

A small, simple brick Gothic design of the 187os by C. A. Buckler, for the owner of Hadzor House. The church has an attractive and characterful interior and with the adjoining former school lies in an idyllic rural setting.

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Halesowen - Our Lady and St Kenelm

A dual-purpose church and hall of the mid-1960s, cleverly planned to take advantage of its sloping site. 

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