Aigburth - St Thomas More

This  modest  church  has  a  welcoming  interior,  but  is  not  of  special architectural or historic interest.

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Ainsdale - Sacred Heart

A modest early 20th century church with a well-designed modern extension.

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Aintree - Blessed Sacrament

Edmund Kirby was the architect of many Catholic churches in the North West  and  Blessed  Sacrament  is  a  competent  exercise  in  the  Early English style which Kirby favoured. The church is a prominent building in the area.

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Aintree - Holy Rosary

Fairly standard, but not uncharacterful, church of the 1950s, of reinforced concrete construction and T-shaped in plan. The semi- detached  cobbled baptistery  with  its  concrete  tripod/fleche  lends  the exterior  some  quirky  interest,  and  the  contrasting  volumes  of  the interior are attractive.

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Allerton - St Bernadette

An  attractive  1930s  church,  influenced by  the  work  of  the architects Bernard Miller and F. X. Velarde. Whilst not listable under current criteria, the building has local significance and acts as a landmark within the area.

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Anderton - St Joseph

St Joseph’s is a relatively modest example of the work of E.W.Pugin, with significant local historical associations.

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Anfield - All Saints

All Saints is a mature and accomplished Perpendicular Gothic design in rock-faced sandstone by J.B. Sinnott, a significant Liverpool Catholic architect at the turn of the 20th century. Its interior is somewhat altered (albeit with some sympathy).

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Ashton-in-Makerfield - Our Lady Immaculate

A good example of the work of Peter Paul Pugin, a well-known Roman Catholic church architect, which preserves much of its original character, with some elaborate internal fittings.

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Ashton-in-Makerfield - St Oswald and St Edmund Arrowsmith

A highly accomplished exercise in historicism, St Oswald’s is the culmination of a series of church designs by J. Sydney Brocklesby, including St George Derby (1920) and St Augustine Nottingham (1923) inspired by the Romanesque  churches of the  south of  France. The quality of the stone carving is very good, and there is excellent Arts & Crafts stained glass by Harry Clarke of Dublin. The church houses the shrine containing the Holy Hand of the martyr St Edmund Arrowsmith.

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Ashton-in-Makerfield - St Wilfrid

Functional 1970s church of little architectural importance or interest.

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Astley - St Ambrose Barlow

The church is a modest post-war suburban building, designed using simple materials to create a functional, but attractive internal volume. It has modest architectural merit externally.

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Atherton - St Richard of Chichester

Interwar brick and terracotta church with perpendicular Gothic detailing. The exterior is plain apart from the gable facing the road. Attractive interior with some good original fittings.

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Aughton - St Mary

Chapel and attached presbytery of the low-key type that prevailed between the passing of the Second Relief Act of 1791 and the Catholic Emancipation   Act   of   1829.   As   at   the   slightly   earlier   church   at Burscough, the attached contemporary presbytery is built at right angles to the church, rather than following the usual pre-Emancipation back-to-back arrangement. The interior retains its original Corinthian engaged  columns  and  oval  saucer  dome  in  the  sanctuary,  and  the seating in the western gallery.

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Billinge - St Mary

A  good  example  of an early  19th   century  chapel, built  shortly  before Catholic Emancipation and displaying more of a show front than such reticent earlier chapels as those at Portico and Netherton. The interior has been altered and retains little of its original character.

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Birkdale - St Theresa of Avila

The church is a good example of its type, exhibiting an unusual plan and forming a group with the presbytery and school. The interior has fine spatial qualities and good stained glass.

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Blundellsands - St Joseph

Fairly large church in Early English style, on a prominent corner site. Part of the early development of Blundellsands, and built with financial support from the Blundell family of Crosby Hall. The architect A.E. Purdie built widely for the Catholic Church, but this is his only church in Liverpool Archdiocese.

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Boothstown - Holy Family

Inter-war brick and terracotta church with perpendicular Gothic detailing. Exterior is plain apart from gable facing the road. Attractive interior with some good original fittings; the re-ordering in 2000 affected  the  east  end  but  kept  the  character  of  the  church  intact. Although relatively plain, the church does have some architectural and historic merit.

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Bootle - St James

A late work by M.E Hadfield, completed by his son Charles. Although somewhat old-fashioned for its date, this is an expensive and architecturally ambitious urban church, sumptuously furnished. The church and contemporary presbytery form a good group.

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Bootle - St Joan of Arc

The church is of modest architectural interest, but displays fairly advanced liturgical planning for its date and is notable for its dalle de verre stained glass.

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Bootle - St Monica

One of the major churches of the 20th  century. Opened in 1936 to the design of the Liverpool architect Francis Xavier Velarde, Pevsner described St Monica’s as ‘an epoch-making church for England’. A powerful design, much influenced by the Modern Movement of continental Europe, particularly the work of Dominikus Bohm in Germany. The massive tower has external sculpture by Herbert Tyson Smith. The interior has much bare brickwork, relieved by a more decorative sanctuary with a fine reredos with carved angels and a floating canopy. Velarde’s attention to detail can be seen in the design of the chrome altar rails, the fluted holy water stoups, the font, and even the chrome mantles over the recessed radiators in the aisles.

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