Ormskirk - St Anne

Large mid-19th century Decorated Gothic church built for the Benedictines by Weightman & Hadfield. The church is prominently located on a raised site, within a large burial ground. Richly polychromatic interior filled with carvings and furnishings of interest, including a high altar designed by Edmund Kirby. The character of the interior has been retained and enhanced in the reordering and redecoration of 2000-05.

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Orrell - St James

The mission at Orrell goes back to 1699. The present building originated in 1805 as a typically plain pre-Emancipation chapel, hidden away behind the priest’s house. It was doubled in size in the 1840s. The addition  of  a  bell  tower  in  1882  from  designs  by  James  O’Byrne (working contextually in an untypical – for him – Classical style) proclaims the revived confidence of the Catholic Church in the later 19th century. The church stands in an extensive burial ground and forms a good group with its associated presbytery and school buildings.

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Parbold - Our Lady and All Saints

A fine, little-altered building with a good interior and furnishings. It is the most prominent building of the village and, with the adjacent Notre Dame Convent (formerly Lancaster House), forms the most significant architectural grouping of the place.

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Parr - St Vincent de Paul

A modest brick church, with a minimum of architectural ornament.

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Peel - St Patrick

This simple church was designed in 1864 by the notable Gothic Revival architect E.W. Pugin. Whilst it remains essentially intact, the original furnishings have been lost, and the interior has been altered through reordering.

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Pemberton - St Cuthbert

Large and internally impressive church in a modern interpretation of Gothic, with glass by Joseph Nuttgens.

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Penketh - St Joseph

An  accretive  building  of  limited  architectural  interest,  originally  a simple  1920s  mission  hall,  now  with  enlargements  of  the  1960s  and 1980s.

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Penwortham - St Mary Magdalen

St Mary Magdalen’s is an exceptional building by Francis B. Roberts, one of the most interesting church architects in England of the late 20th and early 21st century. The church has received widespread attention in the architectural press and is a building of architectural distinction which is likely to be listed when a review of buildings of this date becomes appropriate.

The original church, now the church hall, is a building of some architectural quality which may have been eligible for listing before recent alterations. Roberts has incorporated the building as an attached church   hall   with   great  sensitivity  and   the   link   between  the   two buildings makes explicit architectural references to the earlier building.

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Penwortham - St Teresa

St Teresa’s is of some interest as a typical Roman Catholic church of the mid 1960s with features typical of mid-late 20th century design. Stylistically of its time, liturgically more conventional.

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Plank Lane - Our Lady of the Rosary

The church is typical of many built in the 1930s to serve inter-war estates, although this building replaces an earlier church on the same site. The building was the work of the prolific local practice J.C. Prestwich & son, designed in an austere Romanesque style. It is architecturally of modest merit. The lofty interior is a well-lit, well- proportioned space with original fittings from the 1930s and from the earlier church.

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Platt Bridge - Holy Family

A good example of a modest post-war church in a functional version of traditional forms.

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Port Erin - St Columba

The original church of St Columba dates from 1923, but the present building is the result of a major reconstruction carried out in 1993-96. Whilst the building is of limited architectural and historic interest, it is an example of creative adaptation which has helped to strengthen the local Catholic community.

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Portico - Our Lady Help of Christians

This is a good example of a discreet Catholic chapel built about the time of the Second Relief Act. The church is built as a rear extension to the handsome double-fronted priest’s house, as at St Benet, Netherton. The north wall  of the church faces the road and masquerades as a  farm building. Though altered, the interior still retains something of its late Georgian character.

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Prescot - Our Lady Immaculate and St Joseph

A fairly modest but assured church by Hansom, a well-known and original  architect of many Catholic churches.   The interior has  been adapted, but much of the original character remains.

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Rainford - Corpus Christi

This is a functional modern church of little architectural interest.

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Rainhill - St Bartholomew

Pevsner calls this ‘the noblest Catholic church in South Lancashire’.  It is a handsome neo-classical building, with an Italianate campanile, which has a splendid classical interior.   The church is part of a group which includes the presbytery, school, convent and a large graveyard with a handsome Renaissance-style entrance arch.

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Ramsey - Our Lady, Star of the Sea and St Maughold

The church of Our Lady of the Sea and St Maughold is an exceptionally important building from the early 20th  century, and one of the finest of Giles Gilbert Scott’s churches. It is little known in England, and it is a credit to the small Ramsey parish that it survives in such exemplary condition. Whilst the building was erected in 1909-10, Scott continued to make further improvements and provide additional furnishings until 1946. As with his very different commission for Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, Scott restricted the decorative treatment of the Ramsey church to small areas of intense colour and exquisite detail. Within this small space, and with a limited budget, he created a church of timeless beauty and great spirituality.

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Roby - St Aloysius

F. X. Velarde is a significant 20th century church architect and St Aloysius is a very assured design in his stripped-down modern Romanesque style.   Many of the original fittings designed by Velarde survive.

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Scarisbrick - St Elizabeth

An important building by the architects Pugin & Pugin for the Marquis of Casteja of Scarisbrick Hall. It represents a fine, generously endowed work of architecture incorporating imported Continental woodwork almost   certainly   from   the   collection   of   Charles   Scarisbrick   of Scarisbrick Hall. The church can be considered as part of a group with Scarisbrick Hall and associated estate buildings. The Hall is one of the seminal buildings of the 19th century Gothic Revival in England.

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Seaforth Village - Our Lady Star of the Sea

Although its design is rather old-fashioned for its date, this is a handsome and richly appointed building by  one of the more prolific Roman Catholic architectural firms in the North West at the end of the 19th century.

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