Bootle - St Richard of Chichester and St Alexander

Solid interwar church, built in Italian Renaissance style. The interior volume, finishes and acoustics are of high quality.

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Bootle - St Robert Bellarmine

Brick interwar church of neo-Romanesque design by L.A.G. Prichard. The tower is something of a local landmark. Some furnishings of note have survived the 1992 reordering.

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Bootle - St Winefride

The external appearance of this 1950s church is unremarkable, but the effect of the stained glass, coupled with other features and furnishings of note, gives the interior some quality.

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Brindle - St Joseph

St Joseph and the associated buildings are of high historical and architectural importance. The church is a good example of an early 19th century Roman Catholic chapel, with later alterations and furnishings of architectural interest. The attached presbytery and cottage are buildings of architectural and historic interest in their own right, retaining a range of contemporary interior features.

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Castletown - St Mary

This modest building is the oldest Catholic church on the Isle of Man. In spite of many changes and renovations over the years, it still retains much of its original character. Of special interest internally are the gallery, with its timber columns, balustrading and pews, and the two Harry Clarke stained glass windows.

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Childwall - Christ the King

Christ the King is a fine modern church, designed by L. A. G. Prichard and Son, who were one of the most interesting designers of religious buildings in the northwest of England during the post war period. The church benefits from a strong architectural concept based on a centralised plan and a bold structural system, which give it a distinctive character. A number of changes have taken place, mostly sensitive to the character of the building, though because of these, the church no longer retains its original form.

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Childwall Valley - St Paschal Baylon

A strongly individualistic building in the New Brutalist style, with some furnishings of note.

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Chorley (The Moorland Sanctuary) - St Joseph

The group formed by the church, school and presbytery has some historic interest. Architecturally they are not of strong interest, but the integration   of   the   church   with   the   school   below   is   a   relatively uncommon survival in Roman Catholic Churches in the area.

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Chorley - St Chad

St Chad is an example of a church which has grown accretively. The tower has some architectural quality and the earlier elements retain historic character.

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Chorley - St Gregory

St Gregory’s is of historical importance as an early manifestation of revived open Catholic observance in the Chorley area. The church has been  subject  to  many  changes  of  which  the  distinctive  and  unusual tower (1845) is of particular interest. The modern reordering is simple and unobtrusive.

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Chorley - St Joseph

A competent design by Matthew Honan, typical of the cheaper kind of church being built around the turn of the 20th century.

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Chorley - St Mary

St Mary’s is a highly visible building which forms a landmark. Despite the  history  of  piecemeal  building it  forms  a  coherent  whole  and  the interior in particular is a rich and satisfying architectural composition incorporating fixtures and fittings of quality.

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Chorley - St Mary

St Mary’s is a highly visible building which forms a landmark. Despite the  history  of  piecemeal  building it  forms  a  coherent  whole  and  the interior in particular is a rich and satisfying architectural composition incorporating fixtures and fittings of quality.

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Churchtown - St Patrick

The church consists of two elements, the original early 20th century church and a new church added in 1999-2000. The earlier building is without special architectural interest. The new church mixes modern materials and forms with traditional elements, and is not without architectural quality.

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Clayton Green - St Bede

St Bede is a good example of the modest Nonconformist type of Catholic chapel built in the early years of the 19th  century. It forms part of a group of broadly contemporary buildings associated with the mission in the area, which had previously centred on rooms in private houses.

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Clinkham Wood - St Patrick

A confident exercise in Brutalist architecture built in 1963-4 and influenced by Gillespie Kidd and Coia’s St Paul’s, Glenrothes (1955). Forms a good group with parish hall and presbytery, designed in the same idiom.

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Clubmoor - St Matthew

St Matthew’s was F. X. Velarde’s first church, designed when he was still in the office of Weightman & Bullen. The building was illustrated in Budden’s Book of the Liverpool School of Architecture. The tall tower has considerable landmark value and the unaltered interior with its Art Deco fittings is notable.

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Coppull - St Oswald

A good design, in which massing and detail are well handled.

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Croft - St Lewes

The church is a good and typical example of the type of unassuming Roman Catholic chapel built in the years between the Second Relief Act and Emancipation.   As here, these buildings were often attached to presbyteries,  whose domestic  character  helped  to  mask  the religious function of the chapel. Despite internal alterations, the interior retains something of its original character.

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Cronton - Holy Family

Holy Family is a modest village church built by a private benefactor in the early 20th  century. It remains largely unaltered, and retains some internal features of interest.

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