Crosby - St Helen

Functional building of the late 1960s by Weightman & Bullen, who built widely in the Archdiocese.

Read More

Crosby - St Peter and Paul

Large Gothic Revival church of the 1890s by Sinnott, Sinnott & Powell, who built widely in the Archdiocese in the closing years of the 19th century. The church and contemporary presbytery form a good group. The internal plan is conventional, but the volume impresses, and there are a number of furnishings of interest and quality, including a pulpit designed by A.W.Pugin.

Read More

Croxteth - Our Lady Queen of Martyrs

This is a modest modern building by the Prichard practice, architects of many churches in the Archdiocese, but is not of great architectural interest.

Read More

Douglas - St Mary of the Isle

Together with the Ramsey church, St Mary of the Isle is one of only two listed Roman Catholic structures on the Isle of Man. When built in 1859, it expressed the confidence of the island’s Catholic community. An impressive work by Henry Clutton, a leading ecclesiastical architect of the mid 19th  century, with important 20th  century furnishings by Giles Gilbert Scott, and containing other significant art works, it is a building of major interest.

Read More

Eccleston - St Agnes

A church of modest architectural ambitions, and is notable above all for its old-fashioned design (the medievalising tower dates from the time of the Second Vatican Council).

Read More

Eccleston - St Julie

A functional design by a prolific post-war practice.

Read More

Euxton - St Mary

The church is a good example of a medium-sized church by E.W. Pugin which forms a group with the attached presbytery, also by Pugin. The interior has fine spatial qualities and some later fittings such as the stained glass add to the historic character.

Read More

Fairfield - St Sebastian

St Sebastian’s is a modest building, built to serve what was an affluent community at the time of its building. The exterior is simple, though not without some architectural interest in the wide west window and the sculptural detail.  The interior is also simple, but with a rich sanctuary lined with marble and with an elaborate painted reredos.

Read More

Fazakerley - Holy Name

A  small  church  of  concrete  frame  construction  which  nevertheless makes a bold and original architectural statement.    While the longitudinal plan is conventional, the church contains some furnishings of note and is a good example of a church and hall built at the time of and reflecting the emerging reforms of the Second Vatican Council.

Read More

Ford - Holy Spirit

The   church   building   is   a   functional   modern   structure   of   limited architectural interest.

Read More

Formby - Our Lady of Compassion

Church built in transitional Lombard Romanesque/Gothic style by the distinguished  Catholic  architect  Henry  Clutton,   on   land  given   by Thomas Weld-Blundell of Blundell Hall. Although externally plain, the interior volume impresses, and contains a number of features and furnishings  of  great  quality  and  interest.  Chief  among  these  is  the fitting out in the 1920s of the baptistry and Motherhood Chapel, by artists associated with C. R. Ashbee’s Gloucestershire School of Handicraft. The church was altered and adapted after the Second World War by the notable Liverpool architect F. X. Velarde. Catholic worship has taken place here since 1686, when the first chapel (now the presbytery) was built. Together with the churchyard and its structures, the Rectory with its outbuildings and the presbytery, the church forms part of a group of considerable architectural, townscape and historical interest.

Read More

Formby - St Jerome

A relatively  modest example of the prolific practice of Weightman & Bullen, square on plan under a pyramidal roof. The dramatically expressed steel stanchions give the exterior a certain presence, and the interior is a pleasant, well-lit space designed to meet the requirements of the post-Vatican II liturgy.

Read More

Freshfield - St Anne

Utilitarian design of the 1930s, somewhat altered.

Read More

Garston - Holy Trinity

The building is of no architectural or historic importance

Read More

Garston - St Francis of Assisi

This church is a landmark in a run-down area, and a building of consistent quality and construction. The interior is noble and well- proportioned, and contains high quality fittings.

Read More

Gateacre - Our Lady of the Assumption

The Church of Our Lady of the Assumption is an accomplished and unified design of the 1960s by the Liverpool architects L. A. G. Prichard. The plan form, roof structure and natural lighting design are closely integrated to produce a building that both functions well and is spiritually uplifting. Less ambitious than other buildings by the same practice, it is a successful and individual modernist design.

Read More

Golborne - All Saints

The   present   church   is   a   modern   building   of   little   architectural importance, though it does incorporate many fittings from the previous 1920s church.

Read More

Grassendale - St Austin

Built in 1838, St Austin’s is one of the oldest churches in the Archdiocese, and has a distinguished history of service to the Catholic community of South Liverpool. 

Read More

Halewood - Holy Family

A  small  church  of  the  late  1960s  with  a  welcoming  character,  but without special architectural or historic interest.

Read More

Halewood - St Mark

A very modest building of the 1960s, of no special architectural or historic interest.

Read More