Leigh - St Joseph

Mid-19th century stone-built town church with 13th  century Gothic details. The church is a major work by the architect Joseph Hansom. The west tower is a local landmark and the exterior has a strong architectural presence. The spacious interior has a striking roof form, designed by Hansom to create an uncluttered interior, although altered soon after construction. Liturgical fittings include a fine gilded marble high altar, Gothic reredos, statuary and stained glass. Part of a good group of historic RC buildings on this site.

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Leigh - Twelve Apostles

Inter-war brick church with simple Gothic detailing and plain exterior. Attractive interior with some original fittings; the re-ordering altered the east end. Although relatively plain, the church does have some architectural and historic merit and contributes to the street scene.

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Leyland - St Mary

A building of outstanding importance for its architectural design, advanced liturgical planning and artistic quality of the fixtures and fittings.

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Litherland - English Martyrs

The building is an example of a type of brick-built Romanesque church which was popular in the inter-war period.  It is an early work by L. A. G. Prichard, who were to become one of the principal practices working in the Archdiocese in the post-war years.

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Litherland - Our Lady

The church is of some interest as a work by the Prichard firm, and with many  features  characteristic  of  its  date,  like  the  monopitch  roof, skeletal bell tower and dalle de verre glass.

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Litherland - St Elizabeth

A fairly modest church building by a well known firm of architects.  The interior has been considerably altered and some of the original decoration lost.

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Little Crosby - St Mary

Early (1845-7), thorough-going example of Puginian Gothic by Weightman & Hadfield. It is a monument to Catholic feudalism resurgent, built by the Blundells of Crosby Hall, a notable recusant family. It replaced an early 18th century chapel and priest’s house, buildings which survive to the east. The church occupies a prominent position in a central village location; in its churchyard setting it is, in the words of The Buildings of England, ‘just like an Anglican parish church  –  a  sign  of  the  strength  of  Catholicism  in  this  part  of  the country’.

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Liverpool - Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King

One of the major British buildings of the twentieth century. The building comprises two parts, each of international significance. Sir Edwin Lutyens’ monumental and sublime crypt is all that was completed of Archbishop Downey’s grandiose scheme to eclipse Giles Scott’s Anglican Cathedral, and even rival St Peter’s in Rome. Sir Frederick Gibberd’s superstructure, completed in 1967, was built quickly and to a much reduced budget. It is nevertheless the outstanding monument in this country of the ‘aggiornamento’ of the Second Vatican Council, and is a showcase of the work of many of the finest British artists of the post- war period.

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Liverpool - Our Lady of Reconciliation de la Salette

Perhaps  the  most  accomplished  of  E.W.  Pugin’s  ‘industrial  designs’, built in 1860. Comparable to, but slightly earlier than Pearson’s St Peter’s, Vauxhall – shared features are the solid walls, high lancet windows and apsidal east end. 

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Liverpool - Our Lady of the Annunciation

A small church designed by E.W. Pugin, an architect of national standing. Its special importance derives from the quality of its interior, and especially from the exceptional fittings and furnishings designed by J. F. Bentley. It also contains panelling and stained glass by A.W.N. Pugin  which  were  reused  from  the  former  church  on  the  site.  The artistic treasures, and the way in which they are integrated into a well designed interior, makes this one of the most important churches in the Archdiocese.

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Liverpool - Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception

Modern church not of special interest, but historically associated with, and incorporating fittings from E W Pugin’s former church of Our Lady, St Domingo Road.

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Liverpool - Sacred Heart

Polychrome red and yellow sandstone Decorated Gothic church on prominent corner site. The best elevation is the west front, facing towards Mount Vernon Street (now a private street incorporated within the grounds of the Royal Liverpool Hospital). 

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Liverpool - St Anthony of Egypt

St Anthony’s is the main historic church on the northern side of the city, complementing St Patrick’s, Park Place (1821-7) in the south. It is a fine and complete early Gothic Revival design by John Broadbent, a pupil of Thomas Rickman. 

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Liverpool - St Charles Borromeo

St Charles Borromeo is a church of some significance, with a tower that serves as a landmark in the local area. It is one of a number of works in the Archdiocese designed by Pugin and Pugin. The exterior is more important than the interior, which lacks exceptional features or contents.

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Liverpool - St Francis Xavier

One of the major monuments of the Catholic and Gothic Revivals in England. Designed in a free and inventive Decorated style, with its schools and college (now part of Hope University) this formed part of the most extensive group of religious buildings in the city. 

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Liverpool - St Michael

One of E.W. Pugin’s ‘industrial designs’, built in 1864-5. While not of the quality of his earlier church of Our Lady of Reconciliation, and built more cheaply in brick, it does share with that church the common features of solid walls, high lancet windows and apsidal east end. 

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Liverpool - St Sylvester

One of Pugin & Pugin’s more impressive churches, both in external massing and design, and in the quality of the internal fitting out. The campanile is a local landmark, and the contemporary presbytery has group value with the church.

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Liverpool - St Vincent de Paul

St   Vincent   de   Paul   is   an   important  church   which   has   played   a significant role in the spiritual life of Liverpool. It serves as a landmark in a once bustling, but now depressed area of the inner city. Designed by E. W. Pugin, with a spatially impressive, well furnished and luminous interior, this is one of the architect’s major churches.

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Longton - St Oswald -

Church and associated buildings are not of great architectural interest.

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Lowe House - St Mary

A large and idiosyncratic 1920s church in a free mixture of Gothic and Romanesque styles. This striking building is a landmark in St Helens.

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