Abbey Wood - St Benet

A small and plain neo-Romanesque church of the early 20th century, one of many built in the Diocese under the patronage of Miss Frances Ellis, and one of several similar designs by the Rev. Benedict Williamson. The interior has been much altered.

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Abbey Wood - St David

A functional modern church of 1964, built to serve the Abbey Wood Estate. The exterior is plain, while the interior is notable for a flank wall largely of coloured glass.

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Addiscombe - Our Lady of the Annunciation

A large suburban church of the early 1960s, built for an expanding congregation and anticipating the liturgical reforms of the Second Vatican Council. The church is of portal frame construction, and is a mainstream design of its time. The furnishings by Michael Clark are of note.

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Anerley - St Anthony of Padua

A late Gothic Revival church of 1925-27 by F. A. Walters, whose son was the parish priest at the time. It retains several original furnishings. The predecessor building of 1898, originally housing school and chapel, survives beside it.

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Ashford (South) - St Simon Stock

A recently-built church, not of special architectural or historic interest. The marble reredos (reused from elsewhere) is an internal furnishing of note.

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Ashford - St Teresa

A large modern church of distinct form, fit for purpose and with an impressive internal volume, but architecturally not distinguished. It replaced a church of 1865 by E.W. Pugin, from which some of the furnishings have been re-used.

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Aylesham - St Finbarr

A  pre-fabricated  building,  bought  off-the-peg  in  1957  to  replace  a smaller earlier church in this 1920s mining village.

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Balham - Holy Ghost

A  late  19th   century  church  by  the  noted  Catholic  architect  Leonard Stokes, who infused Gothic with an Arts and Crafts imaginative flair. The exterior is plain and not as designed by Stokes, but the interior has some Stokesian features and other furnishings of note.

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Barnes - St Osmund

A small church built in 1954-55 to a design of 1939 by Archard & Hardy. The interior has striking parabolic arches, while the exterior is more conventional. Furnishings include fine Stations of the Cross by Philip Lindsey   Clark.   The   church   makes   a   positive   contribution   to   the Castelnau Conservation Area.

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Battersea - The Sacred Heart

Built in 1892 by F A Walters for the Salesians, in an (untypical for Walters) Italian Romanesque style, the design being based on the Salesian church in Turin. With its four-stage tower and octagonal spire, the church is a major landmark in the Battersea Square Conservation Area. The spacious groin-vaulted interior contains a number of furnishings of note, including wall paintings by the artist-priest George Fayers.

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Battersea Park - Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St Joseph

A modest Gothic Revival church, serving a poor district. The original small church by Buckler survives as the Lady Chapel; this was considerably  enlarged ten years later by the addition of a nave and chancel by John Adams, a local architect. Adams’s additions are influenced by the plain polychrome brick Gothic style popularised by James Brooks, whose nearby church of the Ascension, Lavender Hill was begun in 1876. The interior is very plain but there are some furnishings of note, particularly the marble altars. The church, presbytery and surrounding former convent buildings, possibly by F A Walters, form a good group and make a positive contribution to the Battersea Park Conservation Area.

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Bearstead - St Peter

A 1980s suburban church designed by a local firm of architects responsible for several churches in the area. Architecturally it is interesting for its plan, integrating church and presbytery into one building.

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Beckenham - St Edmund of Canterbury

A large late Gothic Revival church of the 1930s by J. O’Hanlon Hughes, who   also  designed  the  furnishings  and   fittings.   The  Buildings   of England volume states that without the vault ribs and ‘other fusinesses’ the church ‘would … be worthy of Sir Giles Scott himself’. A major reordering took place in about 2000. The tower has townscape value and the church is locally listed.

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Beckenham Hill and Bellingham - The Annunciation and St Augustine

A centrally-planned circular building of the 1960s, displaying the influence of the competition-winning design by Frederick Gibberd for Liverpool’s Metropolitan Cathedral (1960-67) and the new liturgical vision of the Second Vatican Council.

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Benenden - Catholic Chapel

A charmingly modest ‘colonial’ style chapel built in the 1930s by Messrs Colt, a local firm specialising in timber framed buildings.

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Bermondsey - Our Lady of La Salette and St Joseph

A modest brick church built in the 1860s to serve a poor and mainly Irish congregation. With their polychromatic brick Gothic detail the church and the adjacent presbytery make a positive contribution to the Bermondsey Street Conservation Area. The interior of the church is distinguished by some fine furnishings added between the wars by F.A. Walters & Son.

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Bermondsey South - St Gertrude

One of a large number of utilitarian church designs built in the early 20th  century under the patronage of Miss Frances Ellis. Its brick industrial character sits well in its railway-side setting. The building has the trademark Miss Ellis circular window and, like other Tasker churches at Stockwell and Catford, is built on a Greek cross plan. There are no furnishings of particular note.

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Bexley - St John Fisher

A modern church of 1974-75, on a central plan. It is located in the Old Bexley conservation area.

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Bexleyheath - St John Vianney

A flint-faced church of 1958-59 in a muted late Gothic Revival style, very conservative for its date. The church makes a positive contribution to the local scene.

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Biggin Hill - St Theresa of the Infant Jesus

A  small  church  built  in  1930,  initially  as  a  parish  hall  and  later converted and extended. It is of little architectural or historic significance.

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