Lee - Our Lady of Lourdes

A church of 1939 in the Early Christian style, designed by an architect member of the congregation. The tower has landmark value and the church makes a positive contribution to the centre of Lee. Within the bright and impressive interior, the sanctuary furniture is of particular note, especially the baldacchino.

Read More

Lewisham - St Saviour and SS John the Baptist and Evangelist

An Italianate church of the early 20th  century by Claude Kelly, with an opulent interior of coloured marbles. The 126ft campanile was added in 1929 and is a major local landmark.

Read More

Littlestone - St Augustine's Hall

A   red   brick   turn   of   the   century   church   hall,   acquired   by   the Augustinians  in  1940.  The  building  is  utilitarian,  with  an  attractive west end with a shaped Dutch gable.

Read More

Lydd - St Martin of Tours

A curious small building in a crude version of the Gothic style, constructed by the Folkestone builder Otto Marx and possibly designed by him. The ornaments and fittings of the church are of the simplest. The building was principally intended to serve the nearby military camps.

Read More

Maidstone - St Francis

A composite building of three distinct phases (1880s, 1950s, 1990s), all very much in the style of their time. The external appearance has been greatly marred by the demolition of the spire, the application of cement render and the utilitarian additions of the 1950s. The interior retains more of the original character, and some furnishings of note. The presbytery is a fine Georgian town house, listed grade II*.

Read More

Maidstone South - Holy Family

An architecturally unexceptional church building of the 1970s.

Read More

Margate - St Austin and St Gregory

The church is of historical significance as one of the earliest centres of the 19th-century Catholic revival in Kent.  The founding connection with the Gillow family is interesting and unexpected. The tower is something of a local landmark, and in its design bears some similarities to that for Pugin & Pugin’s church at Walmer (qv). In other respects the architectural claims of the building are fairly modest, and there have been repeated alterations.

Read More

Meopham - St Paul

A large church of the 1960s, not of particular architectural or historic significance.

Read More

Merton - St John Fisher

St Joseph’s is typical of many substantial concrete-framed churches erected in the 1960s and 1970s and is a good example of the type. The building is a thoughtful design by a competent post-war architect who specialised in Catholic churches.

Read More

Michael - Pollards Hill - St Michael

Apparently a former Mission hall of c1930, utilitarian with some Gothic trim.

Read More

Minster, Sheppey - Immaculate Heart of Mary (chapel of ease)

A plain and functional 1950s chapel built by the parishioners, using a prefabrication system.

Read More

Mitcham - St Peter and St Paul

A modest building of the 1880s built under the patronage of the Simpson family of Mitcham and designed by F. A. Walters, who was responsible for several  other churches in the area. The church and its adjoining presbytery form a good group on the edge of Mitcham Common.   The interior of the church is chiefly notable for its handsome timber hammerbeam roof.

Read More

Mongeham and Sandwich - St John the Evangelist

Built in the 1930s as a dual church and social centre to serve the new mining community housed in Upper Deal.  It is a simple building with a west   front   of   unusual   design   which   recalls   some   entertainment buildings of the same period.

Read More

Morden - St Teresa and the Child Jesus

A simple but striking interwar church designed by the prolific Catholic architect W. C. Mangan.  The tall roof is a prominent feature of the local area and contributes substantially to the architectural interest of the interior.  The church was built to serve the newly-built St Helier housing estate.

Read More

Mortlake - St Mary Magdalen

A Gothic Revival church of 1851-52 by Gilbert Blount. The planned spire was never built and the tower remained a stump. The church is surrounded on two sides by a cemetery, which includes the mausoleum shaped like an Arab tent where Sir Richard Burton and his wife are buried. The churchyard is the burial place of a number of other Catholic notables, including the architects J F Bentley and Leonard Stokes. Among the church’s historic furnishings and fittings is an altar by George Goldie and a stained glass window commemorating Burton. The church   is   locally   listed   and   is   an   important   landmark   in   the conservation area. The Burton connection makes the church and cemetery a visitor attraction.

Read More

Mottingham - Our Lady Help of Christians

A late Gothic Revival church of 1932-33 by Edward John Walters. Conservative for its date, the church retains few of its original furnishings and has recently been reordered with the addition of a new porch. The building has some townscape value.

Read More

New Addington - Good Shepherd

A post-war church of mainstream design, serving  a  modern housing estate. Its brick campanile is a local landmark. The chief interest of the church lies in its six dalle de verre windows, made by or in consultation with Dom Charles Norris of Buckfast Abbey.

Read More

New Malden - St Joseph

Designed by two able architects, Osmond Bentley and Adrian Gilbert Scott,  and  built  in  stages  during  the  1920s,  St  Joseph’s  is  a  hybrid church and the end result is not entirely satisfactory. At first sight the interior is surprisingly conventional in appearance, with its Gothic arcades but Scott’s handling of many details is original.

Read More

Norbiton - St Pius X

A very simple building of the mid-1950s, though not without some architectural character, particularly in the bold treatment of the tall pitched roof.

Read More

Norbury - St Bartholomew

A simple Ellis church of the early 20th century, much altered and added to over the years. Despite the many changes, the building has a visual and architectural coherence, due to the sensitivity and quality of the various interventions. The liturgical reordering  of 1997-98 by Austin Winkley Associates is a model of its kind.

Read More