North Cheam - St Cecilia

An interesting and idiosyncratic church of the 1950s, designed to meet the needs of new housing development in the area. The architect, H. S. Goodhart-Rendel, was a scholarly and innovative designer and his building is an original essay in church design.

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Northfleet - Our Lady of the Assumption

A dramatic and innovative brick church of 1913-16 by (Sir) Giles Gilbert Scott, built with funds donated by the Tolhurst family. Its monumental exterior is a precursor to Scott’s design for the west tower of Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral. The austere interior is little altered and retains many   original   furnishings   by   Scott.   The   tower   is   an   important landmark in the conservation area.

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Norwood - St Chad

A large interwar church marrying Arts and Crafts with Italian Romanesque elements. The quality of the external design, detailing and massing is high, and the basilican interior is an impressive space retaining several furnishings and features of note. The church is locally listed and is a positive feature in the South Norwood Conservation Area.

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Norwood - The Faithful Virgin

A convent chapel of 1871 built in memory of Thomas Grant, first Bishop of  Southwark.  It  forms  part  of  a  large  and  significant  complex  of convent and school buildings by William Wardell, George Goldie and Edward Goldie. The chapel is long and thin on plan, and has an impressive interior with some furnishings of note (although suffering from  a  drastic  reordering  in  the  1970s).  The  complex  is  of  high townscape merit, and is on Croydon Council’s local list.

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Norwood West - St Matthew

An Ellis church 0f 1904-05, much altered and added to over the years. The single most important feature in architectural and artistic terms is the  statue  of  St  Matthew  on  the  west  front,  by  Eric  Gill’s  assistant Joseph Cribb.

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Nunhead - St Thomas the Apostle

The original church was built in 1905 and is typical of the so-called ‘Ellis boxes’ built under the patronage of Miss Frances Ellis. This survives as the sanctuary of a larger church of the 1970s, a very functional design.

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Old Coulsdon - St Mary, Help of Christians

A modest timber portal framed church of the 1960s, the large coloured glass windows of the sides suffusing the interior with light.

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Oprington - Holy Innocents

A modern church of 1980-81 built to a striking design by Michael Blee, as part of a complex of church, parish hall and presbytery. Problems with damp have necessitated the erection of a new presbytery (2000), and the planned redevelopment of the parish hall and the former presbytery. The church replaced a chapel of 1907-09 by Benedict Williamson and paid for by Miss Frances Ellis.

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Otford - Holy Trinity

A modest and, at least internally, not unappealing church of the 1980s. The Stations of the Cross are the only fittings of particular note.

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Paddock Wood - St Justus

A  simple  Modern  church,  its  design  slightly  flawed  by  the claustrophobic   effect   the   roof   form   gives   to   the   interior.   Not unappealing but equally not of any great architectural distinction.

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Parkwood and Wigmore - St Augustine of Canterbury

A plain modern church of 1991-92, of little architectural or historical significance.

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Peckham - Our Lady of Sorrows

A lofty, impressive and relatively unaltered urban church of the 1860s by E W Pugin, following on from his work on existing churches in Southwark and Ramsgate, but his first new church commission in the Diocese. The church was built for the Capuchin Friars and, with the substantial adjoining Friary buildings of the 1880s, forms a good group in an area which has seen much post-war redevelopment.

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Peckham Rye - St James the Great

One of the so-called ‘Ellis boxes’, a group of economically-built churches put up in the Diocese in the first decade of the 20th  century through the patronage of Miss Frances Ellis. Unlike some other Ellis churches, later alterations have served to erode rather than enhance the modest qualities of the building; proper investment in the building has for a long time been handicapped by uncertainty about its future. The presbytery is a house (or pair of houses) dating from the 1830s, and is listed grade II. The church occupies a pivotal position in the Holly Grove Conservation Area.

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Pembridge (chapel of ease to Paddock Wood) - St Anselm

A very modest chapel of no particular architectural or historic interest, located in a conservation area.

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Petts Wood - St James the Great

A  modern  church with  a rectangular plan,  built  from designs  by  an architect  parishioner.  General  de  Gaulle,  who  lived  at  Petts  Wood during the Second World War, contributed to the fundraising for the church. The north aisle and the Baptistery have coloured glass by Hardman of Birmingham and Pierre Fourmaintraux.

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Plumstead - St Patrick

A large Gothic Revival church built in 1901 as the Anglican church of St Paul. Acquired by the Catholic Archdiocese of Southwark and reopened in 1969 as St Patrick’s church, after a landmark Act of Parliament. As the first Anglican church to be bought by the Catholic Church it set an important precedent.

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Plumstead Cross - Holy Cross

A plain, functional church of 1950, originally intended as the parish hall. It is located in the Plumstead Common conservation area.

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Purley - St John the Baptist

A very late Gothic Revival design, started just before the Second World War and completed in the late 1950s. The detailing is solid and worthy, but the overall architectural effect is a little dull.

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Putney - Our Lady of Pity and St Simon Stock

An    Edwardian    church    with    an    Italianate    west    front    and    a ‘Wrenaissance’ interior. Lady Westbury was the benefactress and J. C. Radford the architect. In 1936 F. A. Walters & Son added the sanctuary. The northwest tower remained unfinished. Furnishings of note include a  fine  baldacchino and  several  pieces of  sculpture by  Philip  Lindsey Clark. The church is locally listed and makes a positive contribution to the West Putney Conservation Area.

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Rainham - St Thomas of Canterbury

A  modern  church  of  1956-58  by  Eduardo  Dodds.  The  atmospheric interior is decorated with fine sculpture by Michael Clark, and ceramic panels by Adam Kossowski. The tower is a local landmark. The former temporary church of 1934 survives as the Parish Centre.

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