Chatham - St Paulinus (Chapel of Ease)

Built in 1788 as a Methodist chapel, where John Wesley preached on several occasions, the building was sold in 1892 to the Catholic Church. It is a plain building which has been much altered, and is now in a state of disrepair. The building’s primary significance lies in its historical associations; it lies within the Brompton Lines Conservation Area.

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Chatham - The Sacred Heart

A small, functional chapel, built in 1949 as a dual-purpose church and parish hall, with a sanctuary capable of being divided off. It is of little architectural or historical significance.

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Cheam - St Christopher

The older part of St Christopher’s is a former school chapel of the 1860s, designed by a well-respected firm of architects and a good example of the institutional Gothic style of the period.   Alterations, enlargements and a refitting in the 1970s have blurred the character of the original chapel building but it is still of interest, although tightly surrounded and obscured by 20th-century residential development.

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Chessington and Hook - St Catherine of Siena

A  modest  but  internally  attractive  post-Vatican  II  centrally-planned church, built by Lanner of Wakefield to one of their standard designs.

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Chiselhurst - St Mary

A small church of 1853-54 by the Puginian architect William Wardell, notable above all for its associations with the exiled family of Napoleon III who then lived in Chislehurst. After his death in 1873, the Empress funded the addition of a large French Gothic chapel by Henry Clutton (1874).  Although  the  coffins  of  the  Emperor  and  the  Prince  Imperial were later transferred to Farnborough Abbey, the church retains the memorial to the Prince, as well as some furnishings given by the Empress. Graves in the churchyard include that of Charles West, the founder of Great Ormond Street Hospital.

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Chiselhurst - St Patrick

A former cinema of the 1930s, the building was converted in 1961 for use as a church. It retains the original fold-down cinema seats. The church is located in a conservation area.

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Clapham - Our Immaculate Lady of Victories

One  of  the  major  Victorian  churches  of  south  London;  a  Decorated Gothic ragstone church of about 1850 by William Wardell, with major additions by J. F. Bentley and others. Little describes Wardell’s vaulted two-bay chancel as ‘masterly […] and quite worthy to rank beside Butterfield’s […] chancel at All Saints’ Margaret Street’. Bentley’s Lady Chapel is exquisite in its detailing, and his large north transept respectfully follows the detail of Wardell’s work. By contrast, Bentley’s house  for  the  Redemptorists is  a  fine  example  of  red  brick  Arts  and Crafts Gothic, and is described by Little as ‘as good as anything he ever did’.    Giles  Gilbert Scott’s  war  memorial  of 1920  adds  to  a  group  of historic   buildings   which   is   perhaps   the   dominant   feature   in   the Clapham Conservation Area.

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Clapham Common - St Vincent de Paul

An Italianate design of 1906-07 by Claude Kelly. The intended western campanile was never built, but the church remains a coherent and attractive design, with a handsome front elevation and barrel vaulted Classical interior. Modern reordering has been sensitive and well- detailed, but has perhaps robbed the interior of some of its former richness. The church sits amidst mid-19th  century Italianate villas, and makes a positive contribution to the local conservation area.

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Clapham Park - St Bede

A quirky Classical design, one of many churches built with the help of Miss Frances Ellis, a major benefactor to the Diocese in the early years of the 20th  century. The building is physically attached to a mid-19th- century stucco villa which was formerly the London home of Miss Ellis, and which is a survival from Thomas Cubitt’s development of Clapham Park.

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Cliftonville - St Anne

As  designed  in  the  1920s,  when  Margate  was  still  a  flourishing  resort,  St Anne’s was to be a large and splendid church.  Sadly, the original vision was never realised and the eastern parts of the building, including the transepts and a splendid southeast tower, were not built as intended. The present east end is an intelligent approach to the problem of completion, but does not approach the dignity of the original scheme.

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Colliers Wood - St Joseph

An inexpensive church of the 1960s, with a neo-Georgian show front to the High Street concealing an otherwise functional building.

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Coulsdon - St Aidan

A church dating largely from the 1960s, but incorporating part of its 1930s predecessor by Adrian Gilbert Scott. The building is an expression of progressive architectural and liturgical thinking of the early 1960s. The building is architecturally plain (and the external design suffers from the loss of the needle spire), but the interior provides a light and spacious setting for a fine set of modern furnishings by Brother Xaver Ruckstuhl, Pierre Fourmaintraux and Graham Sutherland.

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Crayford - St Mary of the Crays

A functional church of 1972-73, part of which used to be the parish hall. It incorporates one stained-glass window and the organ from the Victorian predecessor church.

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Croydon - Our Lady of Reparation

A town centre Gothic Revival church of the 1860s by E W Pugin, considerably enlarged in the 1880s, in an early work by the (then) local architect F A Walters. The external appearance of the church has been marred by an unsympathetic addition of the 1970s on the south side, but the  design remains  a strong  element in the  local  scene,  occupying  a pivotal position between the high-rise commercial centre of Croydon town centre to the south, and the vestigially-surviving 19th-century villa development to the north. Inside, Walters’s work is seamlessly integrated  with  Pugin’s  to  create  a  dramatic  hall  church-like  space, with many individual furnishings of note.

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Croydon - St Gertrude

A   modest   neo-Romanesque  design  of  1903  by   F   A  Walters,   with additions of 1935 by E J Walters, which forms a picturesque grouping with the adjacent contemporary presbytery. Despite some unsympathetic alterations, the church and presbytery make a positive contribution to the local scene and the church is included in Croydon Council’s local list. The interior has been altered and does not contain furnishings of particular note.

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Dartford - St Anselm

 A large modern church with a square plan, built in 1973-75. It is the fourth church to serve the parish, and includes some furnishings from the predecessor buildings.

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Dartford - St Vincent

A striking high-peak tile-hung church of 1985, built in the grounds of the former St Vincent’s Industrial School, which had moved to Dartford in 1876. There are re-interred school burials of local importance and the parish centre and Hubert House community centre are based in former school buildings.

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Deal - St Thomas of Canterbury

An interesting neo-Norman brick church of the 1880s by F A Walters, one of the more prolific and original Catholic architects working in the Diocese in the decades either side of 1900.  The interior is a simple and effective space with elaborate sanctuary fittings.

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Deptford - Our Lady of the Assumption

A plain Gothic Revival church of 1844-1845 designed by the mission priest of Greenwich, Canon Richard North, who was also responsible for later extensions. Notable furnishings include an elaborate reredos by F. A. Walters and executed by Earp, Son and Hobbs. The furnishings of the Sacred Heart Chapel are also by Walters.

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Dockhead - The Most Holy Trinity

Bermondsey Dockhead has claims to be the oldest mission in the Archdiocese, having been established in 1773 in a chapel which was destroyed in the Gordon riots of 1780. A later church was destroyed in wartime bombing and replaced by the present church by H S Goodhart- Rendel. In the words of the list entry, this is  ‘an impressive building and a fine example of Goodhart-Rendel's work, showing his use of polychrome  brickwork,  inspired  by  High  Victorian  churches  and  his powerful use of concrete to achieve a manipulation of sculptural form and spatial and exciting arrangement’.  The plan form and some of the detailing shows a clear influence of Bentley’s Westminster Cathedral. The church is little altered and contains a number of original and later furnishings of note.

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