Gravesend - St John the Evangelist

An early Gothic Revival church, with a wide and spacious interior, built in 1834 by William Jenkins Junior as an Anglican proprietary chapel. It was acquired by the Catholic Church in 1851. Internal furnishings of note include two early 20th-century Gothic altars by F A Walters. The tower, added by Goldie and Child in 1872-73, is a local landmark in a conservation area. The church, the hall (the former school) and the adjoining presbytery form a good group.

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Gravesend - St Mary (chapel of ease)

A small medieval chapel which was originally the manor chapel and later   the   parish   church   of   Denton.   Disused   by   the   time   of   the Reformation and in ruins by the 18th  century, it was bought by George Matthews Arnold and restored by F. A. Walters in 1901.

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Greenwich - Our Lady Star of the Sea

A Gothic Revival church by William W. Wardell of c.1846–1851, which catered for a congregation which included Royal Naval Hospital pensioners and sailors. The interior decoration and furnishings are largely by A. W. N. Pugin, with some work by E. W. Pugin. The tower with spire is an important landmark. The church is part of a group with nearby  17th   and  18th-century  buildings,  which  include  the  presbytery and an Ursuline Convent. The site is located within the West Greenwich conservation area and the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site.

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Hadlow - St Peter

A modest Victorian former Nonconformist chapel latterly acquired for Roman Catholic use.

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Ham - St Thomas Aquinas

A former Anglican parish school of the 1870s, converted to Catholic use in  the  1960s  by  F.  G.  Broadbent  and  Justin  Hastings.  The  external design is an attractive gabled composition which makes a positive contribution to the Ham Common conservation area. The church is included in the Council’s local list.

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Harrietsham - Good Shepherd

A simple 19th-century mission church, originally for Anglican use, built for railway construction workers and a rare example of such a building surviving in ecclesiastical use.

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Hartley - Oratory of St Francis de Sales

A thatched timber barn, probably from the 17th century. It is one of two remaining buildings of the Middle Farm at Hartley, and is a picturesque and locally important vernacular survival. The building was converted to a church in 1913 and an extension was built in 1985.

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Hawkhurst - St Barnabas

A  variation  of  a  standard  product  offered  in  the  1950s  and  60s  by Messrs. Lanner of Wakefield, based on a portal frame of laminated timber trusses.

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Hayes - Our Lady of the Rosary

A  functional  church  of  1954,  originally  built  as  the  multi-purpose Rosary Hall. It is of little architectural or historic significance.

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Headcorn - St Thomas of Canterbury

A functional modern church of no architectural distinction.

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Hearne Bay - Our Lady of the Sacred Heart

Built for the Passionist Fathers in 1889 at the expense of Dionysus and Catherine Broderick, who also gave their house to be the presbytery. The designer was the London architect Albert Vicars, and the commission came on the back of Vicars’s rebuilding of the Passionists’ mother house on Highgate Hill, London. The Herne Bay church is a tall and quite impressive exercise in the Second Pointed Gothic style. Internally the most impressive features are the three altars with their elaborate reredoses.

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Herne Hill - St Philip and St James

A modest church of the early 20th   century, one of many  built in the Diocese under the patronage of Miss Frances Ellis. The design is a fusion of neo-Romanesque and Classical features. The church was radically reordered in the 1970s, when dalle de verre windows were introduced, from the workshop of Dom Charles Norris at Buckfast Abbey.

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Hersden - St Dunstan

A modest church built in 1934 to serve a colliery village.   The original weatherboarded exterior was replaced with pebbledash in the 1950s.

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Horsmonden - All Saints

A typical and fairly unaltered example of a small mid-Victorian chapel, of  a  type  which  would  have  been  approved  by  the  Ecclesiological Society. The church was originally built as a chapel of ease to Horsmonden Anglican parish and was acquired for Catholic use in the 1970s.

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Hythe - The Virgin Mother of Good Counsel

A combined church and school building of the 1890s with the church forming the upper part. The architect Alfred Purdie used the simplest Gothic detailing, presumably in the interest of economy. The interior of the church space with its open scissor-braced roof has considerable character.

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Kennington Park - St Wilfrid

A brick Gothic church by F.A. Walters, fairly cheaply built but with a tower of striking design which is a landmark in the local conservation area.  The  church  was  bombed  in  1940  and  the  nave  subsequently largely rebuilt. The chief features of the church are the fine and little- altered  marble  and  gilded  furnishings  in  the  sanctuary  and  Lady Chapel.

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Kew Gardens - Our Lady of Loreto and St Winefride

A classical, Italianate church of the early 20th  century by the architect- priest A J C Scoles, the youngest son of the Gothic Revival architect J J Scoles. Canon Scoles normally worked in the Gothic style but Miss Frances  Ellis,  the  benefactress,  insisted  on  a  classical  design.  The church was sympathetically extended in the 1960s by Walters & Kerr Bate. It has been extensively re-ordered and retains only a few furnishings of note. It makes a positive contribution to the conservation area and is locally listed.

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Kidbrooke - St John Fisher

A brick church of 1964 by Bingham Towner & Partners, conventional in both its planning and design. The campanile has landmark value.

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Kingston - St Agatha

St Agatha’s was built principally at the cost of a wealthy local benefactor, Louisa Currie, and designed by a well-established Catholic architect,   John   Kelly.   The   church   has   a   relatively   unassuming Italianate exterior, with a pedimented main front facing the road.   It has an impressive interior on a basilican plan.

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Kingston Hill - St Ann

A  neo-Georgian  brick  church  of  the  1960s  designed  by  Goodhart- Rendel’s partner, the brick campanile adding an Italianate touch. Both exterior and interior are simply detailed and without elaborate fittings.

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