Abbots Langley - St Saviour

A large church of the early 1960s, modern in architectural style and conventional in its liturgical planning (just pre-dating the Second Vatican Council). Although somewhat altered, the design impresses both inside and out, with a single internal space with vaulted timber roof lit by high-level clerestory lights.

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Acton - Our Lady of Lourdes

An Italian Romanesque church built at the start of the twentieth century from designs by Edward Goldie. It has a good interior, surprisingly plain in terms of architectural detail, and could easily be mistaken for work of the interwar period. The rich marble furnishings date mainly from the 1950s. The entrance front is an important feature in the Acton Town Centre Conservation Area.

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Acton East - St Aidan of Lindisfarne

A large suburban church of 1960-61 in what was then a thoroughly up-to-date style. It is by a respected firm who designed many Catholic churches at the time, conventional enough in its general lines and planning, but having an interior of better quality than most. The church has some significant fixtures and fittings by Graham Sutherland, Pierre Fourmaintraux and others.

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Acton West - The Holy Family

A mid-1960s church with an elongated polygonal plan, reflecting a desire to reconcile post-Vatican II liturgical planning with the long, narrow site. It has a bold, almost aggressive, external appearance, and a more attractive, light interior. The church lies within, but does not make a special contribution, to the local conservation area.

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Archway - St Gabriel

A modern church built after the Second Vatican Council. Blind walls minimise the noise from the adjacent street and the church is lit instead by means of a hidden clerestory. The church contains several sculptures by Willi Soukop RA. The interior has been altered.

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Ashford - St Michael

A large and imposing brick church and a significant work by Giles Gilbert Scott. Built in three stages to a unified design, it has an interior of both beauty and simplicity, depending for its effect on clear, sheer lines. The design bears a family resemblance to Scott’s earlier church of St Joseph, Sheringham, Norfolk.

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Baldock - Holy Trinity and St Augustine

A functional church design of the 1970s, with a later pitched roof.

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Barnet - Mary Immaculate and St Gregory the Great

A functional centrally-planned church of the 1970s built by Lanner Construction, a firm responsible for many similar churches in the diocese and elsewhere. It replaced a church of 1860.

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Bayswater - St Mary of the Angels

Building work started in 1851–52, to a Puginian Gothic design by Thomas Meyer. Work was continued by Henry Clutton when the church was taken over by the newly-formed Oblates of St Charles, whose first Superior, Mgr (later Cardinal Archbishop) Manning, was related to Clutton by marriage. The church was enlarged and furnished over three decades and more by J. F. Bentley, displaying that architect’s stylistic development. The church is flanked by the presbytery of c1870 and by two former school buildings. Although the tower was never completed, the church is an important local landmark.

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Berkhamsted - Sacred Heart

An elegant design of 1966-67, built ‘on restrained modern lines with a simple and economic plan-form to serve the new liturgy’. The church occupies a large site, outside the historic core of Berkhamsted.

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Bethnal Green - Our Lady of the Assumption

Designed by Edward Goldie for the Assumptionists, this is a plain but powerful Gothic design. Described in the Buildings of England volume as a ‘good urban church’, it has a lofty and bright interior with rich internal furnishings. Along with the adjoining listed priory, the church is an important focal point in the conservation area.

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Bishop's Stortford - St Joseph and the English Martyrs

A handsome Italianate church built in 1906 for the Redemptorist order, along with a monastery incorporating Windhill House, a property of sixteenth-century origin. The church is now served by secular priests, and the monastery buildings are in separate ownership and use. The church occupies a prominent position near the town centre, close to the medieval Anglican parish church (with which it shares a new church hall). The church retains many internal fittings of note, some of them paid for by the builder of the church, Fr Oliver Vassall-Phillips. 

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Borehamwood - St Teresa of the Child Jesus

A design of the early 1960s by the F. X. Velarde Partnership, displaying characteristics typical of that practice, and evoking traditional forms in an unmistakably modern way. This is a late design, built after Velarde’s death. The church retains some good furnishings, but others (notably the Annunciation pieces on the west front) have been lost. The design of the west front is a powerful element in the townscape, close to the civic centre of Borehamwood.

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Borehamwood North - St John Fisher and St Thomas More

A large church of the 1950s, built on a traditional longitudinal plan, serving the post-war expansion of Borehamwood to the north. Although not of special architectural and historic interest, the building is something of a local landmark.

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Bow - Our Lady and St Catherine of Siena

A plain Gothic Revival church built for the Dominican Sisters by Gilbert Blount. The church was later extended by the addition of a nuns’ choir to the south. The church suffered war damage and the nave was reconstructed in facsimile. Several important original or early furnishings survive, including the high altar and reredos designed by Blount, and the east window by Hardman. The church and former convent are prominent features in the local conservation area.

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Bow Common - The Holy Name & Our Lady of the Sacred Heart

A late nineteenth-century Gothic Revival church, restored in the 1950s after bomb damage. It retains a few of the original furnishings. The church is now home to the Vietnamese Chaplaincy, as well as being a chapel of ease to the parish of Poplar. The tower with its short aluminium spike is a local landmark.

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Brentford - St John the Evangelist

A brick-built, mid-Victorian church, constructed on a small budget yet a building of great charm and some architectural interest. Distinctive features include the squat tower and its two-stage capping, and the cast-iron north arcade. It has undergone minor, sympathetic structural changes. It is notable for having contained early work by J. F. Bentley, now largely removed (but leaving the western screen).

 

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Brook Green - Holy Trinity

An impressive early Victorian Gothic Revival church which shows the assured hand of its architect. It has much notable stained glass and carving in the altars and their settings. Its elaborate steeple forms an important local landmark in the Brook Green Conservation Area.

 

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Bunhill Row - St Joseph

A small chapel in the basement of a former school of 1901. The church is the successor to a school-chapel of c.1850. It contains two important stained glass windows of the 1820s from the old St Mary, Moorfields, the original pro-cathedral of the diocese. Internal remodelling and the addition of a fine carved and pedimented entrance gateway date from 1993, and were carried out from designs by Anthony Delarue.

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Buntingford - St Richard of Chichester

A Gothic Revival flint and stone church built in 1914-15 from designs by Arthur Young, and financed in part by the colourful Catholic writer and polemicist Mgr R. H. Benson, of nearby Hare Street House. Benson died in 1914, and the church became his memorial. The tower was added later. The church, presbytery and Benson Hall are of historical interest, and occupy a prominent position within the local conservation area.

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