Hoxton - St Monica's Priory

An economically-built but distinctively-designed mission church and priory, by E. W. Pugin for the Augustinians. Pugin also built a school (demolished). The interior has an unusual timber arcade and a number of high quality historic furnishings, including the high altar and reredos of 1875 by Mayer of Munich. The buildings make a notable contribution to Hoxton Square, in the South Shoreditch Conservation Area. Recent investigations have uncovered painted polychromy in the sanctuary.

Read More

Isleworth - Our Lady of Sorrows and St Bridget

An Edwardian church in the centre of Isleworth and a landmark at a busy junction. Externally it is a building of mixed materials and is designed in a loose Renaissance style. There is a good, harmonious interior and altar setting. The architect, E. Doran Webb, was responsible for the Birmingham Oratory, begun some four years before this church.

Read More

Islington - St John the Evangelist

A neo-Romanesque brick church built in the 1840s to designs by J. J. Scoles. Originally intended to be symmetrical, the twin west towers were finished later as a picturesquely asymmetrical composition. The chief furnishings are in the side chapels, including paintings and frescoes by Edward Armitage RA amongst others. The church is flanked by contemporary London stock brick terraces, which include the presbytery and convent. It is a significant landmark in the local conservation area.

Read More

Kensal New Town - Our Lady of the Holy Souls

A relatively simple Early English brick church, built on a tight budget for the Oblates of St Charles from designs by J. F. Bentley. The church has been reordered several times and has lost some key furnishings and decorative schemes in the process. Nevertheless, the building has a commanding presence in the local street scene and is of interest as an early design by a significant Catholic architect. A major scheme of refurbishment was taking place at the time of the visit.

Read More

Kensal Rise - Church of the Transfiguration

A Methodist church built in 1899 and acquired for Roman Catholic worship in 1977, the present worship space the product of an extensive refurbishment of 2010. The external design and spire make the church a local landmark.

Read More

Kensington 1 - Our Lady of Victories

A post-war church of stripped neo-Gothic design by Adrian Gilbert Scott, built on the site of the bombed former pro-cathedral by George Goldie. Financial economies resulted in some compromises to Scott’s early designs. The church is set back from the road behind a screen incorporating shops. With the large neo-Georgian presbytery, it makes a notable contribution to the local conservation area.

Read More

Kensington 2 - Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St Simon Stock

Built for the Discalced Carmelite Order, this is a late church by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, in a free Gothic style. It replaced a war-damaged church of the 1860s by E. W. Pugin. Scott developed here several of his favourite themes, such as a continuous clerestory and a flush transept. The priory building behind the church was built in the 1880s by Goldie, Child & Goldie. Both buildings make a conspicuous and positive contribution to the conservation area.

Read More

Kentish Town - Our Lady Help of Christians

A substantial Gothic former Methodist church of the 1860s by the London architect John Tarring, architect of a number of large Nonconformist churches. The church, which has a typical galleried interior, was converted for Catholic use in 1970, after the congregation outgrew its E.W. Pugin church in Fortess Road. The Kentish ragstone elevations and spire make a prominent and positive contribution to the Kentish Town Conservation Area.

Read More

Kenton - All Saints

A striking 1960s design with a high peak roof in a Scandinavian idiom, which with its bell tower has local landmark value. The interior is tall and open with the concrete frame exposed.  The sanctuary has recently been reordered.

Read More

Kilburn West - Immaculate Heart of Mary

A former Methodist chapel of c1880, roughly adapted for use as a Catholic church after the Second World War.  The original 1880s interior has been lost. Ambitious rebuilding plans in the early 1970s produced a new presbytery and parish hall, but the intended new church did not materialise.

Read More

Kingsbury Green - St Sebastian and St Pancras

An inexpensive interwar brick church designed by T. H. B. Scott in his characteristic round-arched style, extended in the 1950s by his son T. G. B. Scott.

Read More

Kingsland - Our Lady and St Joseph

A fairly late church by W. C. Mangan, more stripped and less historicist than most of his oeuvre, with a prominent west tower. It replaced a former warehouse, converted by Wardell and E. W. Pugin into a church and school. The current church has two statues by Michael Lindsey Clark.

Read More

Knebworth - St Thomas More

A nicely-detailed and externally little-altered design of the early 1960s, with a high peak roof, such as enjoyed a vogue at that time. The interior is fairly plain in character, but retains some features of note. The church replaced a temporary building of 1935 (now the parish hall), which was the first church anywhere dedicated to St Thomas More, its dedication taking place on the day of the saint’s canonisation.

Read More

Leicester Place - Notre Dame de France (French Church)

Built for the London French community in 1953-55 from designs by Professor Hector Corfiato, the circular design of the church repeats the form of two previous buildings on the site, a diorama of the 1790s and a church of the 1860s by L.A. Boileau. Corfiato’s church is important as an advanced design showing the influence of the Liturgical Movement, and as a showcase of Art Sacré, notably the murals in the Lady Chapel by Jean Cocteau.

Read More

Letchworth Garden City - St Hugh of Lincoln

A substantial and well-detailed church in modern stripped Romanesque style, designed in 1938 but not built until the early 1960s.The church contains a number of furnishings associated with Dr Adrian Fortescue, the noted Catholic scholar and liturgist, who built the first church of 1908 (which survives today as the parish hall) and presbytery. In some ways the design of the church fails to capitalise on the opportunities presented by its site, but these three buildings form a prominent ensemble at the top end of the Pixmore Way, near the junction with the main civic square of the garden city.

Read More

Limehouse - Our Lady Immaculate and St Frederick

An Italianate inter-war church with a fine interior and several original or early furnishings of note. The northeast tower and the statue of Christ at the west end are landmarks in the St Anne’s Church Conservation Area, designed to be seen from the Limehouse Basin and the Thames.

Read More

Lincoln's Inn Fields - St Anselm and St Cecilia

An eclectic design of the early twentieth century by F. A. Walters. The church is contemporary with the Edwardian development of Kingsway, and in common with other original buildings facing that thoroughfare, is faced in Portland stone. The church replaced, and incorporates fittings from, the Sardinian Chapel in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, the grandest of the old Catholic embassy chapels. Walters’s church was damaged by wartime bombing; its west end was refaced and south aisle rebuilt in the early 1950s by Stanley Kerr Bate.  Although somewhat dwarfed by its neighbours, the church holds its own as a prominent building in the Bloomsbury Conservation Area.

Read More

London E2 - St Casimir (Lithuanian Church)

A small brick church built for the Lithuanian community in the East End in the simple Romanesque style which the architect, Fr Benedict Williamson, frequently used for his plainer churches. The focus of the church is the large Tyrolean carved altarpiece of c.1851. A recent reordering has replaced the sanctuary furnishings and removed the painted decoration of colourful folk patterns, leaving the church interior white and focused on the altarpiece. The church is of high significance for the London Lithuanian community.

Read More

Maiden Lane - Corpus Christi

A robust design of the 1870s in Early English Gothic style, Frederick Hyde Pownall’s last, which cleverly overcomes site constraints. The church was built ‘as an act of reparation for the indignities offered to the Blessed Sacrament in this country in the sixteenth century and since’. The dark and atmospheric interior contains some important furnishings, notably by Thomas Earp, but has been somewhat marred by the inappropriate application of textured paint to many of the surfaces. With its pyramidal spire and attached contemporary presbytery, the church makes a positive contribution to the Covent Garden Conservation Area. The church is the base of the Catholic Stage Guild.

Read More

Manor House - St Thomas More

A modern complex of church, parish hall and presbytery, by the prolific firm of Burles, Newton & Partners.

Read More