Burnt Oak - The Annunciation

The church is part of a complex built in the 1920s to serve the new Watling Estate. The picturesque exterior with its neo-Byzantine octagonal crossing tower makes a notable contribution to the Watling Estate Conservation Area. The interior has a bold simplicity. The site lies close to an Area of Special Archaeological Significance.

Read More

Bushey - The Sacred Heart and St John the Evangelist

A large, late 1950s brick church, conventionally planned as it predates the changes emanating from Vatican II. The wide, bright interior is of some distinction, and the church has a commanding presence on a busy main road, adding much to the character of the Bushey High Street Conservation Area.

 

Read More

Camden Town - Our Lady of Hal

A slightly unusual church with a mainland European character, presumably influenced by the Belgian order which commissioned the building in the 1930s from Wilfrid Mangan, a well-known designer of Catholic churches.  The arched interior is impressive. The main body of the church is largely hidden in street views, but the street frontage, with that of the presbytery, makes a positive contribution to the Camden Town Conservation Area.

Read More

Carpenders Park and South Oxhey - St Joseph

A large brick church of 1960 with an impressive wide nave and narrow aisles, typical of conventional church planning before the reforms emanating from the Second Vatican Council. A landmark building in an area of post-war housing.

Read More

Chapel - Diocesan Seminary (Allen Hall)

A well-detailed modern chapel by Hector Corfiato, built to replace a bombed Romanesque Revival convent chapel of 1910-12. The chapel and the attached convent buildings are now the home of the Diocesan Seminary, Allen Hall (which traces its origins back to the seminary established by Cardinal William Allen at Douai in 1568). The buildings are on part the site of St Thomas More’s house at Chelsea, from which a listed garden wall survives.

Read More

Chelsea 1 - St Mary

The mission was founded by the French émigré priest Abbé Voyaux de Franous, mainly to serve the Catholic pensioners of the Royal Hospital, Chelsea. A small Regency chapel was built in 1811–12 and extended several times. The present church, built in 1877–79 from deigns by J. F. Bentley, is on part of a site acquired in c.1840 and developed by A. W. N. Pugin with a convent, schools, cemetery chapel and almshouses. Bentley’s church incorporates both Pugin’s cemetery chapel and a re-erected chapel by E. W. Pugin.

Read More

Chelsea 2 - Our Most Holy Redeemer and St Thomas More

A church of 1894-95, built from designs by Edward Goldie and unusually for that architect in a Renaissance rather than Gothic style. This was probably at the insistence of the mission priest, Canon Keens, who was a great church builder in the diocese. Nevertheless, it is a very accomplished design, despite having to be simplified and reduced due to financial and site constraints. Originally, the church had numerous side altars in shallow niches on either side of the nave; these are now largely filled with a collection of Spanish and Italian paintings. The church is located close to the site of the town house of Sir Thomas More, who was canonised in 1935, at which time the saint was included in the dedication. The church occupies a prominent corner position in the Cheyne Conservation Area, close to an important row of early eighteenth-century town houses, including the home of Thomas Carlyle. 

Read More

Cheshunt - St Paul

A late nineteenth-century former Anglican church hall, acquired for Catholic use in about 1998.

Read More

Chipperfield - Our Lady Mother of the Saviour

A neo-vernacular design with a steeply pitched tile roof, built in 1998. The interior is attractive and welcoming, with extensive, high-quality carvings from a tribe in Tanzania, a thank-offering for assistance given by the Salvatorian Order and parish. The church makes a modest contribution to the Chipperfield Conservation Area.

Read More

Chiswick - Our Lady of Grace and St Edward

A fine, landmark building on Chiswick High Road, by a well-known and significant Catholic architect, John Kelly. The bell tower was built later, to an amended design by Giles Gilbert Scott. The church has a very good interior, well-proportioned and retaining many original fittings. It makes a prominent and positive contribution to the Turnham Green conservation area.

Read More

Chorleywood - St John Fisher

This small place of worship occupies a former private house with an extension, now used as the worship area, designed by the important Arts and Crafts architect, C. F. A. Voysey, in his distinctive style. It is his contribution, rather than the original house or the later use and fitting out as a Catholic church, that makes the building of architectural and historic interest.

Read More

Clapton - St Scholastica

A bright, modern church whose architectural interest lies mainly in its west elevation with its distinctive apses. The presbytery, the former school and the predecessor chapel were originally part of a complex which included E. W. Pugin’s St Scholastica’s Retreat almshouses (demolished).

Read More

Clapton Park - St Jude

A former Methodist church of 1885, much altered in the course of adaptation for Catholic use.

Read More

Clerkenwell - St Peter (Italian Church)

A piece of Italy in London. The church is of a scale and significance belied by its modest contribution to the townscape; hemmed in by other buildings, only the (later) narrow entrance front and loggia are readily visible. The design was conceived in the early 1850s, soon after the restoration of the Catholic hierarchy, when sensitivities about the ‘papal aggression’ were still high. Almost literally ‘from out of the Flaminian Gate’, the original design was modelled on the basilica of San Crisogono in Trastevere, and can be seen as an early architectural manifestation of the triumph of Cardinal Wiseman’s Romanità. Even on the reduced scale finally built in 1862-63, it was still the largest Catholic church hitherto in Great Britain. Built nominally as ‘The Church of All Nations’, it soon became, and has remained, the church of the Italian community in London. The interior is rich in furnishings and painted decoration, the latter somewhat diluted by 1950s overpainting. The present main entrance was added in 1891, from designs by F. W. Tasker, after the laying out of Clerkenwell Road. Its narrow frontage and campanile make a distinctive contribution to the Hatton Garden Conservation Area. 

 

Read More

Clerkenwell - St Peter and St Paul

An Italianate former Nonconformist church, built for the Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion. Acquired just over ten years after its completion, it may be the earliest example of a Protestant church taken over for use by the Roman Catholic Church. The church retains its internal gallery, but has few furnishings of particular note. Externally, its frontage gives straight onto the pavement and is flanked by contemporary terraced houses (including the presbytery), making a handsome contribution to the conservation area.

Read More

Cockfosters - Christ the King

The church forms part of a modernist monastery complex begun in 1940 by Dom Constantine Bosschaerts, a pioneer of twentieth-century Catholic liturgical reform. It was intended to become a parish hall once a larger permanent church had been built. Although the complex was never completed, it has historical significance as an early manifestation in England of the influence of the continental Liturgical Movement; architecturally the design is deliberately functional, and the interior somewhat altered.  

Read More

Commercial Road, London - St Mary and St Michael

A large Gothic Revival church built from designs by William Wardell to serve the East End, and the successor to the eighteenth-century Virginia Street chapel. When first built, it was the largest Catholic church in London (soon overtaken by the Italian church in Clerkenwell). The church contains several historic furnishings, despite war damage and several reordering schemes. Although the intended tower and spire were never completed, the church is a powerful presence in the Commercial Road Conservation Area.

Read More

Copenhagen Street - The Blessed Sacrament

A small urban church with a lively domestic-looking frontage and plain side elevation, now opened to view. The church was doubled in length in the post-war years. Recent structural problems led to the shortening of the church, the demolition of the presbytery and the redevelopment of the site to the rear and side. The frontage makes a characterful contribution to the Barnsbury Conservation Area.

Read More

Cranford - Our Lady and St Christopher

A church of 1970 by the noted post-war Catholic architect Gerard Goalen. The building embodies mainstream architectural ideas of the times and reflects changes in liturgical planning emanating from Vatican II. Although not one of Goalen’s major designs, it combines worship and social spaces within a single building very effectively. The buildings lie within the Cranford Village Conservation Area.

Read More

Cricklewood - St Agnes

A 1930 design in a stripped Romanesque manner typical of the church designs of T. H. B. Scott, with a handsome and austere brick interior.  The east end was reordered in the 1970s, when some of the original or early fittings were removed.

Read More