Welwyn Garden City (East) - Our Lady Queen of Apostles

A large post-war church on a prominent site, designed (with the presbytery) in neo-Georgian style to fit in with the prevailing character of the Garden City. The light and spacious interior was dramatically transformed in the 1980s, with new glass and stone furnishings by Carmel Cauchi. The church and its asymmetrically-placed tower make a prominent contribution to the local scene.  

Read More

Welwyn Garden City - St Bonaventure

The first church to be built in the Garden City, and one of the best of the architect T. H. B. Scott’s many churches in the diocese. Built in 1926, its construction was paid for by Miss Frances Clemson. Externally, the design is loosely Romanesque, with a saddleback west tower. Inside, the church has a simple Italian Romanesque or Early Christian character. The quality of the detailing is high, and there are good stained glass windows by A. A. Orr, Hardman & Co and others. The church and contemporary presbytery lie on Parkway, the central spine of the Garden City, and these buildings, along with the adjoining former convent, make a positive contribution to the conservation area.

Read More

Wembley (Wembley 1) - St Joseph

A handsome building of the mid-1950s with a broad west tower and a striking neoclassical triple-domed interior clearly influenced by the work of Sir John Soane.

Read More

Wembley Park (Wembley 2) - English Martyrs

A circular design of 1971, in which striking use is made of the timber portal frame to give character to the interior.

Read More

Wembley Preston Road (Wembley 3) - St Erconwald

An economically-built steel-framed church of ‘Scandinavian’ type, with a high peak roof, built in the 1960s to replace a 1930s hall/church

Read More

West Drayton and Yiewsley - St Catherine

A mid-Victorian, brick Gothic Revival church by Willson & Nicholl, built for a mainly Irish congregation. The church has largely unaltered interior, with rich and interesting decorative work at the east end. The tower was never completed, the present top stage being an addition of 1985. The church is attractively sited across the road from West Drayton Green and makes a notable contribution to the conservation area.

Read More

West Green - St John Vianney

A functional modern church, typical of its late 1950s date.  Reordering has deprived the interior of some of its better fittings, but enough original furnishings remain to convey the original character.

Read More

Westminster - Metropolitan Cathedral of the Most Precious Blood

The cathedral church of the archdiocese and the mother church of the Catholic community in England and Wales. The cathedral was built in 1895-1905 in the Byzantine style, from designs by John Francis Bentley. While owing much to contemporary and historic precedents, the design remains a highly original and creative tour de force.

Read More

Wheathampstead - St Thomas More

A modest design and build structure of 1971, not of special architectural or historical interest.

Read More

Whetstone - St Mary Magdalen

A post-war interpretation of traditional church forms by W.C. Mangan. Some of the original or early fittings have been removed but most survive and the original character of the interior is well-preserved.

Read More

White City - Our Lady of Fatima

An early-mid 1960s church at the heart of a post-war social housing development. Designed in a stripped round-arched style and still with an aisled, longitudinal plan, it does not have significant architectural interest but, nonetheless, has a light, welcoming interior.

Read More

Whitton - St Edmund of Canterbury

A post-war suburban church by the F. X. Velarde Partnership.  Architecturally, it draws upon the planning and massing of traditional church-building, using minimal detailing, typical of c.1960. It does not have fixtures and fittings of high significance.

Read More

Willesden - Our Lady of Willesden

A large hall church in modern Romanesque style by Wilfrid Mangan and built in 1930.  The church houses London’s principal Marian shrine. The building is a powerful presence in the Harlesden Conservation Area.

Read More

Willesden Green - St Mary Magdalen

A modernist church of the 1930s, whose external appearance has been considerably altered in recent years by the addition of a new pitched roof.  The wide uncluttered interior is typical of its date.

Read More

Wood Green - St Paul the Apostle

A modern church whose cluttered-looking exterior belies an impressive interior space devised on a pentagram plan.

Read More

Yeading - St Raphael

An elegant modern design on a traditional plan, lying at the heart of a post-war council housing estate. There is dalle de verre glass by Pierre Fourmaintreaux in the aisle windows. The bell tower and external silhouette of the church make a notable contribution to the character of the immediate area.

Read More