Croxley Green - St Bede

A small, economically-built brick church dating from the 1950s, with a short 1960s extension with spirelet. The building is not of special architectural or historical interest.

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Cuffley - St Martin de Porres

A simple prefabricated structure of the 1960s, built for the Westminster Travelling Mission.

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Devonia Road, London - Our Lady of Częstochowa and St Casimir - Polish Church 1

A mid-nineteenth-century Gothic Revival church, built as the New Church College, the Swedenborgian national seminary and school. In 1930 it was sold and became the new home of the Polish Catholic Mission in England and Wales. Many of the furnishings have Polish connections, in particular a series of remarkable stained glass windows by Adam Bunsch. The gabled Kentish ragstone and ashlar frontages contrast with the stock brick terraces around, and make a bold and positive contribution to the local conservation area.

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Dollis Hill - St Mary and St Andrew

A compact Italianate church of the 1930s, with a hall beneath.  The richly-decorated architectural volumes are more significant than the individual furnishings; the impressive arcaded interior appears to have been little altered.

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Ealing - Abbey Church of St Benedict

Built in stages from 1899, this is a very large, imposing church as befits its abbey status (the first in Greater London since the Reformation). The style is fifteenth-century Perpendicular and the church has strong echoes of the great late medieval churches of East Anglia. The interior with its long, serene nave is rather more impressive than the exterior. For such a substantial church, the fittings are remarkably lacking in interest, which may reflect losses in Second World War damage; the most important item is the stained glass in the west window by Burlison & Grylls. By virtue of its scale and location, the abbey makes a prominent contribution to the local conservation area. 

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Ealing - Our Lady Mother of the Church

A substantial, mid-Victorian Gothic Revival ragstone church, built originally for Methodist use and acquired for use by the local Polish community in 1986. The design is conventional enough for its time, but shows how Nonconformists had come to embrace the Gothic style and use it to good effect. The interior is impressive and spacious, with a complex roof of some exuberance. The spire is a landmark feature in the local conservation area and a counterpoint to that at G.G. Scott’s Anglican church of Christ the Saviour, a quarter of a mile away.

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Eastcote - St Thomas More

A functional building of the 1970s embodying the principles of Vatican II and providing a welcoming worship space.

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Edgware - St Anthony of Padua

An early twentieth-century church designed originally in a Free Perpendicular Gothic which now has a mixed character as a result of its complicated building history, with several significant alterations and additions.

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Edmonton - The Most Precious Blood and St Edmund

Quite an ambitious and original design for what was originally a monastery church with the monastery building attached. The buildings form a good group with the nearly contemporary school opposite, by the same architect.

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Ely Place - St Etheldreda

A rare and important survival in London of a late thirteenth-century chapel, consisting of an upper and lower church, on the model of the Ste Chapelle, Paris. The church was part of the London residence of the Bishops of Ely, all now lost apart from the church and part of the cloister. The design is notable for the great Geometrical windows at the east and west ends of the upper church. The church was adapted for Anglican use in Georgian Gothick style in the late eighteenth century, at the same time as the laying out of Ely Place. In the 1870s it was acquired and restored by the Institute of Charity (Rosminians), the first example in this country of a medieval place of worship reverting to Catholic use. J. F. Bentley designed the choir screen. The church was damaged by wartime bombing, but was subsequently restored and fitted with fine modern stained glass, notably the great east window by Joseph Nuttgens, and other furnishings of note. The church lies within the late eighteenth-century enclave of Ely Place, in the Hatton Garden Conservation Area.       

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Enfield (chapel of ease) - Our Lady of Walsingham

A functional and economical combined church and hall, built to serve an area of modern housing.

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Enfield - Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St George

A substantial 1950s church in the Early Christian Romanesque style, with a handsome interior.

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Farm Street - The Immaculate Conception

One of the major Catholic buildings of the Gothic Revival, built in 1844–46 by J. J. Scoles as the central London church of the Society of Jesus. It was later enlarged by Clutton and Romaine-Walker with side aisles containing numerous chapels and altars. The church is lavishly furnished by architects and craftsmen of note, including the high altar designed by A. W. N. Pugin. The building sustained some war damage, notably to the stained glass windows. A. E. Purdie built the adjoining residence for the Jesuits, where the Jesuits’ Provincial Curia is based.

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Feltham - St Lawrence

A well-designed inter-war brick church by T. H. B. Scott, in the free Romanesque style so popular for Catholic churches at that time. The church has a harmonious and effective interior. The stone carving by P. Lindsey Clark, stained glass by John B. Trinick, and the sanctuary mural by Carmel Cauchi are of particular note.

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Finchley Church End - St Philip the Apostle

An interwar church in the Romanesque style favoured by its architect, T.H.B. Scott, completed after the war in the same style by his son. Architecturally, the most impressive part of the building is the interior, with its bare brick arches. The church occupies a prominent position on a raised site in the local conservation area. 

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Finchley East - St Mary

A functional but carefully-designed post-war church with a concrete portal frame.

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Finchley North - St Alban

An Edwardian church in the Perpendicular Gothic style, with some elaborate carved detail on the west face of the tower. The church was originally designed by Percy Lamb, J. F. Bentley’s clerk of works in the construction of Westminster Cathedral. The chronology of later additions is unclear.

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Fulham (Fulham 1) - St Thomas of Canterbury

An early Victorian church by A. W. N. Pugin, his only complete parish church in London and one his last three major architectural commissions. It is designed in the style of around 1300, which Pugin considered to be the pinnacle of architectural achievement. There is glass by Hardman, made to designs by Pugin who also designed sculpture for the church. Recent reordering and redecoration by Martin Goalen has been sympathetic, and appropriately Puginian in spirit. With the contemporary presbytery (also by Pugin) and burial ground (containing a number of significant burials and monuments), the church makes a prominent and positive contribution to the Central Fulham Conservation Area.

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Fulham (Fulham 2, Stephendale Road) - Our Lady of Perpetual Help

A brick-built inter-war church in an economical round-arched style, with a pleasing, light and welcoming interior. The building is an early design by T. H. B. Scott, in collaboration with Fr Benedict Williamson, and some of the Italian Renaissance detailing e.g. the high altar reredos, clearly shows the hand of Williamson (cf. his church at Royston, Herts). The church is of local architectural and historic interest, and with its tower makes a distinctive contribution to the local townscape.

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Fulham Road - Our Lady of Dolours

A large Early English Gothic design by J. A. Hansom for the Servite Friars, with a modest street presence and a tall, stately interior. Hansom and his son J. S. Hansom designed the entrance tower and corridor which lead into the church, as well as the adjacent priory. J. S. Hansom designed several furnishings as well as extensions to the church, including the Lady Chapel. The fine high altar reredos did not survive the 1970s reordering.

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