Garston - Our Lady and St Michael

A late 1950s church built with a conventional longitudinal plan, typical of Catholic churches of the time. An original campanile has been demolished. The church has a light, welcoming interior but does not possess special architectural interest.

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German Church - St Boniface

A post-war church, replacing a church by J. Young of 1875 destroyed in the Second World War. This is the fifth church serving the German community in London. The plain modern building has a landmark tower incorporating four bells from the predecessor church, as well as high-quality furnishings, mostly by artists and craftsmen from Kevelaer in Germany, the birthplace of Rev. Felix Leushacke, who initiated the rebuilding.

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Golders Green - St Edward the Confessor

A handsome and substantial early twentieth-century Gothic church by Arthur Young, with flushwork decoration to the towers and several internal furnishings of note.

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Grahame Park - St Margaret Clitherow

Lanners of Wakefield built a large number of centrally-planned tent-roofed churches in the 1970s, of which St Margaret’s is a typical example.

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Greenford - Our Lady of the Visitation

The church is very much a product of its time. Externally it is not a building of great distinction but everything is concentrated on the interior with its massive hyperbolic paraboloid arches, which create an impressive space.

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Grove Park - St Joseph

A simple, brick and portal frame structure, very characteristic of the 1960s, with a single worship space plus a parish room added later on the north side. The latter and the associated narthex have, if anything, added to the visual character of the complex.

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Gunnersbury - St Dunstan

A plain, brick structure, built in 1931 as part of a larger school development. The site backs onto Gunnersbury Park, and is in a conservation area.    

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Hackney - St John the Baptist

A 1950s church, its interior defined by great transverse arch bay divisions. The church is built on the site of Wardell’s bomb-damaged church of 1847-48. The nineteenth-century school (now the hall) survives behind the church. The east tower makes a modest contribution to the Mare Street Conservation Area.

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Hammersmith - St Augustine

A brick Romanesque-style church of moderate size, built during the First World War. It is does not have major architectural distinction but with the adjoining priory building makes a positive contribution to the Hammersmith Odeon Conservation Area. Internally, the church has been somewhat marred by an over-zealous enthusiasm for painting every surface.

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Hampstead - St Mary

This small church dating originally from 1816 is one of the earliest Catholic churches in London and contains the tomb of its founder, the AbbéMorel, who died in 1852.  The nave is plainly decorated but the sanctuary and its side chapels have lavish marble and mosaic ornament. The church is picturesquely located within a terrace of early nineteenth-century houses of the same date, and makes a prominent and positive contribution to the Hampstead Conservation Area. 

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Hampton Hill - St Francis de Sales

A large brick church, typical of the 1960s and the architects who designed it - Burles, Newton & Partners who built many Catholic churches in London and the South East. It has plain, clear lines and makes much use of tall, narrow strips of glazing as a major architectural feature. The Blessed Sacrament Chapel, with its triangular projections, is also quintessentially of its time.

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Hampton-on-Thames - St Theodore of Canterbury

A modern church built to a tight budget and of limited architectural interest. Nonetheless the interior is thoughtfully designed and is a welcoming and appealing worship space. The architect was Austin Winkley, whose practice had earlier designed the church of St Margaret’s, near Twickenham (qv).

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Hanwell - Our Lady and St Joseph

Near the centre of Hanwell, this large 1960s church is a forceful modern design by a prolific firm of church architects. It is a late example of traditional, longitudinal planning which was being supplanted at the time as the ideas emanating from Vatican II came into play.

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Harefield - St Paul

An economically built mid-1960s church originally built as a dual-purpose church and hall, with later additions. The building is located in, but makes no great contribution to, a local conservation area.

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Harpenden - Our Lady of Lourdes

A late, refined essay in Perpendicular Gothic by the prolific Catholic architect F. A. Walters. The tower is in the Hertfordshire idiom, being square and short, with a needle spire. Inside, the church is richly furnished from Walters’s designs, with stone carving by Earp & Hobbs and stained glass by Burlison & Grylls, A. A. Orr and others. The church lies within the Harpenden Conservation Area, close to the medieval parish church of St Nicholas.

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Harrow North - St John Fisher

The last church in the diocese by T. H. B. Scott, built in his hallmark plain Romanesque manner just before the onset of the Second World War. Left unfinished in 1939, the church was much altered in the early 1980s.  As so often with Scott’s churches, the interior makes more architectural impact than the exterior.

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Harrow Road - Our Lady of Lourdes and St Vincent de Paul

A plain modern church, built as part of an integrated complex of social centre and presbytery. The rather forbidding exterior belies a reposeful interior, enhanced by recent furnishings. The church replaced a late nineteenth-century chapel and incorporates some furnishings from that building.

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Harrow South - St Gabriel

A modern (2002) rectangular church with a pyramidal roof, forming part of a parish complex.

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Harrow on the Hill - Our Lady and St Thomas of Canterbury

An unpretentious but effective design by Arthur Young in fourteenth-century style, the first of a handful of English Gothic designs by Young in the diocese. The interior, with its varied and characteristic waggon roofs, is especially well-handled. The church contains good stained glass by Patrick Nuttgens, a local resident, Lavers & Westlake and others. Although contrasting in style, the church’s external roughcast finish fits in well with the Arts and Crafts residential character of the conservation area.

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Hatfield (Welham Green) - St Thomas More

A modest structure of the early 1960s, intended as the hall to a future parish church, but which has remained a chapel of ease to Marychurch, Hatfield.

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