Hatfield South - St Peter

A large church built for the post-war New Town and for workers in the nearby aerospace industry. The building was drastically remodelled in the 1980s, and has lost such architectural interest as it had; however it does contain some good sculptural work by Michael Clark.

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Haverstock Hill - St Dominic

A very large and fine Gothic church, one of the first in England to be built by the revived Dominican Order. Its design by Charles Buckler follows continental Gothic models and incorporates earlier work by Gilbert Blount.  The immensely long nave has fourteen side chapels which, with the window over the high altar, symbolise the fifteen Mysteries of the Rosary; this plan is unique in England. The chapels were furnished by private donors and retain their original late nineteenth-century fittings. The shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes was added in 1912-14, from designs by N.H.J. Westlake.

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Hayes - The Immaculate Heart of Mary

A large suburban church, built in the early 1960s, the plan conventionally longitudinal but the details entirely of their own time. Overall the building has some distinction, especially in the wide, light interior, and contains stained glass and other works of art of some quality.

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Headstone Lane - St Theresa of the Child Jesus

An unassuming but attractive brick church of the 1950s, in the Romanesque basilican manner.

 

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Heart of Jesus - Kilburn - Sacred Heart of Jesus

A large Gothic church, built to serve the mainly Irish Catholic congregation of Kilburn. It was built in two main phases, overseen by the Pugins in the later nineteenth century and F. G. Broadbent & Partners in the mid-twentieth.  The later additions are sympathetically contextual in design, scale and materials. The church contains several furnishings of note, including an elaborate altar in a side chapel by Pugin & Pugin, and stained glass by Hardman, Westlake and Mayer.

 

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Hemel Hempstead (Boxmoor) - St Mary and St Joseph

A modest church with a domestic external appearance, originally dating from 1898 and extended several times since. The design has a pleasant Arts and Crafts character.

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Hemel Hempstead East - Our Lady Queen of All Creation

A modern church of 1987 with integral hall. The church is roughly square on plan and laid out on the diagonal, with a stained glass window at the end of the main axis. It replaced an earlier church built for the New Town in the 1950s.

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Hemel Hempstead West - St Mark

A small modern church, serving the school to which it is attached and the western part of the new town.

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Hendon - Our Lady of Dolours

A mid-nineteenth-century Gothic Revival church by Gilbert Blount, considerably enlarged and reorientated in the 1920s with some interesting fittings, including good nineteenth and twentieth century stained glass.

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Hendon West - St Patrick

A simple early twentieth-century structure, built as an Anglican church hall and converted to use as a Catholic church in 1963. 

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Hertford - The Immaculate Conception and St Joseph

A small stone and flint church of the 1850s, designed by Henry Clutton for Fr (later Cardinal Archbishop) Herbert Vaughan. The style is Early English, but the general form evokes the Ste Chapelle, Paris. The church contains good original and later nineteenth-century furnishings, and has been richly redecorated and augmented in recent years. It forms a good group in the conservation area, with the attached presbytery, former schoolroom to the south and modern loggia to the west enclosing a small burial area and garden. 

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Heston - Our Lady Queen of the Apostles

A large suburban church, built in the early 1960s. The plan is conventionally longitudinal, but the design is entirely of its time. Overall the building has some distinction, especially in the wide, light interior, and contains striking dalle de verre glass by Pierre de Fourmaintraux.

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Highbury - St Joan of Arc

A large post-war church built just before the Second Vatican Council. In the opinion of The Buildings of England this is ‘one of Islington’s best post-war churches’. The broad five-bay nave has transverse parabolic arches with a roof of exposed rafters and purlins. There are several original and historic furnishings, as well as a series of stained glass panels. The bell tower has landmark value.

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Highgate - St Joseph

A large Italian Romanesque design with a prominent dome, built for the Passionists. The interior is richly decorated with wall paintings, oil paintings, side altars and the baldacchino and high altar under the dome.  St Joseph’s Retreat, the house for the community, is attached to the east end. The church is a dominant feature of the local conservation area and, due to its elevated position, is highly visible from Highgate Hill, nearby Waterlow Park and further afield.

 

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Hillingdon - St Bernadette

A suburban brick church of 1960 in a sober, round-arched style. It consists chiefly of a long, uninterrupted nave and sanctuary, and whilst the building does not have any major architectural ambitions, it has a clear, light interior of modest distinction.

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Hitchin - Our Lady Immaculate and St Andrew

A design of the 1970s, replacing the predecessor church of 1901, which survives alongside as the parish hall. The buildings occupy a prominent townscape position at the entrance to the Hitchin Conservation Area. The church is notable for a number of artworks by Theodore Kern.

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Hoddesdon - St Augustine

A large, well-mannered post-war building of civic character and presence, in a prominent corner position in the Hoddesdon Conservation Area. The campanile is a local landmark, and west front, with its stone sculptures by Philip Lindsey Clark, makes a notable contribution to the local scene. This carved group is one of a number of furnishings of note by Clark, Adrian Stokes (now lost), Bernard Davis and others. The interior has been altered at the east end.

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Holloway - Sacred Heart of Jesus

A Gothic design of 1869-70 by F. H. Pownall with attached presbytery and an unfinished tower. Apart from the reordered sanctuary, the church retains several historic furnishings and stained glass. The church and presbytery make a strong contribution to the local conservation area.

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Homerton - Immaculate Heart of St Mary and St Dominic

A nineteenth-century church by C. A. Buckler, uncharacteristically for him in the Early Christian style. Largely rebuilt after severe bomb damage, the interior is decorated lavishly with marble and mosaic work. The church occupies a prominent corner site and the tower is a local landmark.

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Hounslow - St Michael and St Martin

A suburban brick church in Basilican Romanesque style, one of many such built in the interwar period to meet the needs of Catholics in expanding London suburbs. The interior has good marble and mosaic decoration at the east end, but its spatial character has been spoilt by the introduction of a suspended ceiling. The exterior makes a notable contribution to the local streetscape.

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