Arundel - Cathedral of Our Lady & St Philip Howard

Designed 1868-9 Built 1870-3.  Architect J A Hansom. Ashlar walls and vaults. Pitched slate roof. Picturesque gothic composition with details from later C13 sources. Stylobate surrounding cathedral on north & west sides, interspersed with ashlar piers: square bases, octagonal tops and pyramidal caps with foliate finials.

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Ashtead - St Michael

St Michael’s Church is not a building of any great architectural quality.  Nonetheless, with its wood-panelled, centrally planned and light interior, it is a warm and welcoming building, and is well liked by those who worship there.  

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Banstead - St Ann

St Ann’s Church is an unpretentious but serviceable building.  

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Battle - Our Lady Immaculate & St Michael

Our Lady Immaculate & St Michael is a modest building of no great architectural importance.  It stands within the Battle Conservation Area and is a building, both for its architectural and historic interest, that contributes positively to the character of the conservation area.

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Bexhill-on-Sea - St Mary Magdalene

St Mary Magdalene’s church is correctly listed and graded at grade II.  Arthur Young is not a well-known architect though he had a varied and extensive practice based in London.  He designed Catholic churches in Harrow, Buntingford and elsewhere, and convents in Watford and Bayswater.  He was articled to Philip Lockwood in Brighton and with Mickelthwaite & Somers Clarke, and set up practice on his own account in 1877.  

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Billingshurst - St Gabriel

St Gabriel’s church is representative of Henry Bingham Towner’s work, not without architectural merit but not special beyond local interest.

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Bognor Regis - Our Lady of Sorrows

The Hansom family are among the most prolific and best known of 19th century architects of Roman Catholic churches.  Best known is Joseph Aloysius Hansom (1803-1882), inventor of the ‘patent safety cab’, ‘the Hansom cab’ and designer of Birmingham Town Hall, St Walburga catholic church in Preston, Plymouth and Arundel RC cathedrals.  J A Hansom was in partnership with his younger brother, Charles Francis, between 1954-59 and with his younger son J S Hansom 1869-82.  From 1879 J S Hansom had full charge of the practice and he continued the main thread of Hansom & Son architects.  Our Lady of Sorrows at Bognor is a good example of a large urban church.  The west front asserts itself in its narrow street frontage, the upward thrust of the architecture balanced by the strong horizontal frieze.  Internally what impresses is height, size and an austere quality.  The W C Mangan work seems frivolous and lightweight in comparison.  Despite the extensions by Mangan this is a fine example of a church by J S Hansom, in his own right a Victorian architect of some reputation.  

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Brighton - St John the Baptist

Roman Catholic Church. Designed and built between 1832 and 1835 by William Hallett; sculpture by John Carew.  The ritual east end extended sixty feet in 1875 to designs by Gilbert Robot Blount; further additions between 1887 and 1890; wall decorations by Nathaniel Hubert Westlake from 1890 to 1921. Stucco. Roof of slate. PLAN: sanctuary of one bay; choir of 2 bays with north and south chapels of two bays; aisleless nave; organ loft at the ritual west end; baptistery at the ritual south-west corner of the nave; entry porch at ritual north-west; entrance porch at ritual west end. Greek Revival Style; east end executed in Renaissance Revival style. 

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Brighton - St Joseph

Roman Catholic church 1880-1906. The original design, by W Kedo Broder was for a church with a polygonal chancel flanked by outer apsidal chapels, nave, transepts, and a tall west tower and spire. The nave and channel were completed by 1880 to this design; the south transept and chapel were opened in 1885 to the design of J S Hansom; the west front, designed by F A Walters, was completed by 1901, and the north transept and north chapel by 1906. Kentish rag with Bath stone dressings, roof of slate

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Brighton - St Mary

 The church is built of Kentish ragstone with Bath stone dressings and a roof covered in Cornish slate.  The first mass was celebrated on Easter Sunday 1912.  The church has nave, south aisle and a substantial north west tower.  The style is late Gothic or ‘Arts & Crafts gothic’.  The short polygonal sanctuary (in brick) was added in c1978.  The interior is lofty and light, with big three-light windows and cylindrical columns to the south arcade.  There is little stained glass but a recent window by Cox & Barnard of Hove at the east end of the south aisle.

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Brighton - St Mary Magdalen

A stately and lavish town church, of considerable townscape significance grouped with school and presbytery.  

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Burgess Hill - St Wilfrid

A well-designed simple building with some unusually interesting and high quality furnishings and fittings, especially the work by Frank Brangwyn. 

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Burwash - Christ the King

A simple brick church built in the late 1960s with apsed sanctuary with circular top light and lined internally with raised profile concrete block.  

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Caterham - The Sacred Heart of Jesus

The Sacred Heart of Jesus, Caterham, is a building of considerable interest, both on account of its architectural quality and because it is the work of Edward Ingress Bell, an architect of some renown who did little ecclesiastical work, and whose other church designed for the diocese, St Joseph, Guildford, has been replaced by a recent building. 

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Chertsey - St Anne

The church was built between 1929 and 1930 to the design of Geoffrey Raymond of Scoles and Raymond. Father Alexander Joseph Cory Scoles was the third son of J J Scoles, the founder of an important dynasty of Roman Catholic architects.  Raymond was articled to Father (later Canon) Scoles and continued to work with him after he qualified in 1904.  The practice was largely concerned with the design of RC churches and schools.

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Chichester - St Richard of Chichester

St Richards is an unremarkable building but contains an extensive scheme of stained glass, an early use in the UK of the dalles de verre technique.  It also contains paintings of some quality by David O’Connell.  The significance of the glass makes St Richards a candidate for statutory listing.

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Chiddingfold - St Theresa of Avila

This is the best example known to us of a church designed by the Roman Catholic architect, Henry Bingham Towner, whose firm built so many churches for the Diocese of Arundel and Brighton between 1955 and 1970.  It is also, unlike all the other churches visited, constructed of good quality natural materials, and the standard of workmanship is correspondingly high.  It is an asymmetric but carefully balanced design, the church makes an important contribution to the townscape of Chiddingfold, a village that is noted for its many pretty tile-hung cottages and fine medieval inn.

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Chilworth - The Holy Ghost

The Franciscan monastery at Chilworth has a fine setting; it stands in an open meadow-like clearing fringed with woods.  The church of the Holy Ghost lies to the north of the complex and is not immediately seen as you approach the buildings.  Its somewhat austere external appearance is offset by its rich interior.  

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Cobham - The Sacred Heart

Sacred Heart, Cobham, was designed by one of England’s most revered 20th century architects, Henry Stuart Goodhart-Rendel (1887-1959).  A multi-talented man, he was a fine musician, architectural critic and wit.  From 1933 to 1936 he was Slade Professor of Fine Art at Oxford; in 1936 he was appointed Director of the Architectural Association but left after a year or two; and from 1937 to 1939 he was President of the RIBA.  As an architect he is generally considered most successful as a designer of churches.

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Crawley - St Edward the Confessor

Crawley was designated a New Town in 1947 but growth was slow at first.  By 1963 the population had risen to 60,000.  Pound Hill was one of the originally designated 10 neighbourhoods.  St Edward the Confessor was built in 1965 on land given by the Crawley Development Corporation. 

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