Crawley - St Francis & St Anthony (The Friary)

St Francis & St Anthony is a substantial work by Goodhart Rendel in his inimitable brick style.  

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Crawley - St Theodore of Canterbury

A simple, well-proportioned, building but of no special architectural distinction.

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Crowborough - St Mary Mother of Christ

Apart from the little tower and spire the church has little architectural pretension.  

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Dorking - St Joseph

St Joseph’s is one of the many churches designed by the prolific Roman Catholic architect Frederick A Walters.  Had the building been completed as intended it would certainly have merited listing.  As it is, however, the exterior suffers from the lack of the intended tower, and the interior is obviously incomplete without the north aisle.  Walters’ ambitious scheme for the church, with its dramatic flight of stairs to the west and tall tower to the south, was a fine one.  

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Duncton - St Anthony & St George

Gilbert Blount (1818-1876) is one of the lesser known 19th century Roman Catholic architects, perhaps because he was not very prolific.  He began his professional training as a civil engineer with I K Brunel and worked on the construction of the Thames tunnel., nearly loosing his life in one of the floods that occurred during construction.  He worked for a time with Sydney Smirke before setting up on his own and specialising in work for the Roman Catholic community.  His churches are always well crafted but sometimes lack personality, being faithful essays in C13 gothic.   

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East Grinstead - Our Lady and St Peter

Frederick Arthur Walters (1850-1932) was a pupil of George Goldie and, like Goldie, developed an extensive practice designing Roman Catholic churches.  There are eight churches designed by Walters in the Arundel & Brighton Diocese alone, and others were he made enlargements.  Walters best known work is the rebuilding of the abbey at Buckfast in Devon.  Walters was equally at home in the gothic style as the Romanesque.  At East Grinstead the Romanesque or Norman style was chosen, perhaps a client choice.  The church was founded by Sir Edward C Blunt of Crabbet Park, Worth.  The foundation stone was laid in 1897 and the church opened in October 1898 and consecrated in 1899.  

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East Wittering - St Peter

A modest brick church built originally in 1938 with later enlargements.

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Eastbourne - St Gregory

St Gregory’s was built to serve the growing northern suburbs of Eastbourne.  It was designed by A J M McDonough and Gordon Robins from the Eastbourne firm of B Stevens & Partners.  McDonough was the partner in the firm and Robins the chief assistant.  It was Robins who was responsible for the design for St Gregorys.  

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Eastbourne - Our Lady of Ransom

Roman Catholic Church. 1890-1903. By F A Walters. Buff sandstone and plain red tile roof. Decorated style. Chancel , with sacristy etc, nave, north aisle with baptistry, south aisle, lady chapel (north), south chapel, south-west tower and spire, shallow west porch. 

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Eastbourne - St Agnes

 The church of St Agnes is of brick with minimal stone dressings. Nave with aisles, transepts not projecting much beyond the aisles, and sanctuary.  The west front, to the road, is dominated by five stepped lancets.  The interior is plastered with exposed brickwork to the arcades.

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Effingham - Our Lady of Sorrows

Our Lady of Sorrows is a nicely composed and well detailed, if traditional, building of some architectural quality.  Whether this is enough to make it a candidate for listing at the present time seems doubtful.  The font is an important survival.  

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Englefield Green - The Assumption of Our Lady

A good many churches were being built in the Romanesque style in the 1930s (as, for example, the series designed by Wilfred Mangan at this time) but Goldie’s church is better composed and more competently detailed than most.  It is large and self confident.

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Esher - The Holy Name

The Holy Name, Esher, is a fine church, designed in a conservative Romanesque style and carefully constructed with traditional materials.   Well grouped with its ancillary buildings and surrounded by greenery, it makes an important contribution to the conservation area.  

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Ewell - St Clement

St Clement’s Church is a striking building, and its bell-tower is a local landmark.  Inside there are some excellent fittings, all of which were specially designed for the church.  But despite this, the flaws in the original design – especially the orientation of the stained glass windows away from the congregation – must weaken any case that could be made for the church to be listed.

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Farnham - St Joan of Arc

The Church of St Joan of Arc is one of the best works of John Edward Dixon-Spain and, as far as I know, the only complete church built to his design.  Although the style of the church is traditional, there is nothing slavish in the way the architect makes use of earlier forms.  In fact, with its sharply defined cubic shapes and open-arched campanile, it is unlike any other church I have seen.  

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Frimley - Our Lady Queen of Heaven

This is not a church of any special architectural interest.  In 1978 the presbytery was built adjacent to the church and, the same year, work started on the new church hall linked to the south side of the church.  

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Godalming - St Edmund King and Martyr

This is a fine, if austere, church that makes the most of its prominent position on a hillside overlooking Godalming.  The most elaborate feature of the interior is the Lady Chapel with its delicate screen, painted and gilded reredos, stencilled decoration and stained glass all carried out in 1930. 

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Goring-by-Sea - English Martyrs

The interest of the English Martyrs church lies in the decoration of the interior and this is rather of curiosity value than of artistic significance.  

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Hailsham - St Wilfrid

Henry Bingham Towner’s churches are mostly of modest pretensions.  St Wilfrid’s is the smallest of the churches he designed in the diocese.  Whilst a pleasant little building it is unlikely ever to merit statutory listing.

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Haslemere - Our Lady of Lourdes

This is not one of F A Walters’ best churches and, perhaps owing to lack of funds, may not have been finished in the manner intended.  The most interesting feature of the church are the stained glass windows designed by Geoffrey Webb.

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