Thames Ditton - Our Lady of Lourdes

The Roman Catholic Church built a large number of churches in the years between 1953 and 1965 that experimented with new plans in order to achieve a closer relationship between, to put it very simply, God and man.  A centralized plan provides a less hierarchical setting for worship than the traditional plan of sanctuary and nave but also tends to lack focus (besides having the problem that part of the congregation may be seated behind the celebrant).  

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Uckfield - Our Lady Immaculate & St Philip NerI

An unusual church built by the parish priest and his congregation.  The architecture is not distinguished and is let down by having been built to a low budget, ending up as a somewhat austere and utilitarian hall into which has been placed some fittings of fine craftsmanship that give the church its atmosphere.  

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Wadhurst - The Sacred Heart

A curious building, simple but with a few architectural pretensions.  Of no more than local interest.

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Walton-on-Thames - St Erconwald

Although the west front has a certain drama, St Erconwald’s Church is not a building of much architectural refinement and certainly not one of sufficient quality to inhibit future development.  In addition to this, being set back from the road, it does not have much impact on the surrounding townscape.  

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West Grinstead - Our Lady of Consolation & St Francis

Architecturally the building is a fairly typical late Victorian Catholic Church executed to a high standard if a little harsh and mechanical externally.    John A Crawley may have designed the whole building in 1876.  He died in 1881.    The interior is impressive with its complete stone vaulting.  Combined with the historic interest of the site the church is probably listable Grade 2.  

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West Hoathly - St Dunstan

A curiosity that continues to tell its unusual history through the unaltered front and the opened out interior.  The building makes a positive contribution to the character of the conservation area as a vernacular building rather than as a church.  

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Whyteleafe - St Thomas of Canterbury

In the decade between 1955 and 1965 a large number of churches were built, many of which were extraordinarily innovative in their design.  St Thomas of Canterbury, Whyteleafe, with its dramatic openwork spire and light interior, is a good example of church design of this particularly fertile period though not, perhaps, one of the very highest quality.  What is exceptional in this case, however, is the wall of stained glass designed by Pierre Fourmaintreaux in the narthex.   

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Woking - St Dunstan

 The first stone of the church was laid in 1924 and the building was completed some three years later.  The walls are faced with coursed Bargate stone and have Bath stone dressings.  The roof is covered with hand-made sand-faced tiles.  Inside, the walls are of sand-faced plaster with Bath stone dressings.  The style is Perpendicular Gothic Revival.

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Worthing - St Charles Borromeo

One of the many churches designed by H Bingham Towner in the diocese.  Externally a satisfying composition that stands well on its corner site but internally the excessive height in relation to breadth is unsettling. As so often, let down by the use of reconstituted stone which has not improved with age.  

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Worthing - St Mary of the Angels

An exterior that has the ‘wow’ factor in its wider composition and because of its clear derivation from medieval France.  

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Worthing - St Michael

An unusual church with an attractive and devotional interior.  Of much interest but unlikely to be of sufficient interest from a national perspective on 1960s church architecture to be listable.

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