A Brief Introduction to the Diocese of Clifton

The Diocese of Clifton has 123 churches (as of 2016). The cathedral is...

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Amesbury - Christ the King

The church forms part of a complex created in 1985 by enlarging and adapting the existing mid-twentieth-century buildings on the site. The church space is simple and functional, the chief furnishings of note being the sanctuary glass by Henry Haig.

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Bath - Our Lady Help of Christians (St Mary)

A high Victorian Gothic Revival design by Dunn & Hansom for an urban site in the north of Bath. The church remained unfinished, notably without the last west bay. The interior is decorated with fine architectural carving by John Roddis of Birmingham and more recent enrichments. In July 2015, the church was damaged by fire; full repair and reinstatement are proposed.

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Bath - Our Lady and St Alphege

A suburban church designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott and based on the Early Christian basilica of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, Rome. The church is a fine example of the interwar Byzantine style and contains many high-quality furnishings designed by Scott. It was completed in the 1950s to Scott’s design, when the attached presbytery was also built. 

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Bath - St John the Evangelist

The primary Catholic church in Bath and a major work by C. F. Hansom, in Decorated Gothic style. Its spire is the tallest in Bath and is a major local landmark. The rich furnishings include sculpture by Thomas Earp and stained glass and metalwork by Hardman & Co. The church makes a significant contribution to the conservation area and World Heritage Site, offering a dramatic and deliberate contrast with the Georgian architecture of John Wood the Elder’s South Parade.

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Bath - St Peter and Paul

A small church of modest architectural pretensions, built on a square plan about the time of the Second Vatican Council. It occupies the area in front of the late eighteenth-century presbytery, and lies within the City of Bath World Heritage Site. 

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Batheaston - The Good Shepherd

A post-Vatican II church on a square plan, perhaps the most satisfactory of Martin Fisher’s designs in the diocese. While the exterior has a somewhat forbidding character, the interior is well-lit by large expanses of glass with an effective coloured glass scheme over the sanctuary. The presbytery is in a former coach house of early eighteenth-century date, and the site lies within the Batheaston Conservation Area. 

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Bisley - St Mary of the Angles

A small, simple Arts and Crafts design of 1930 by a well-known Catholic architect, designed to sit comfortably in its picturesque Cotswold setting.

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Bourton-on-the-Water - Our Lady Help of Christians

A simple, functional church-cum-hall of 1960, intended to serve a more substantial permanent church which has never been built.

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Bradford-upon-Avon - St Thomas More

The church occupies the principal first-floor room in the mid-nineteenth-century former Town Hall, one of the finest and most prominent historic buildings in Bradford-on-Avon. The original character of the internal space has been considerably altered by the removal of the wall plaster and the introduction of modern fittings, but remains an impressive volume and a dignified setting for Catholic worship.

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Bridgwater - St Joseph

A small urban church built in his favoured early Gothic style by Canon A. J. C. Scoles, who was appointed mission priest after preparing the designs. In 1981 the building was extended to the west in an unsympathetic manner. The church contains a number of significant furnishings, including a side chapel altar designed by Scoles in memory of his father, the architect J. J. Scoles. The older part of the church and adjoining late Georgian presbytery make a positive contribution to the conservation area. 

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Bristol - Christ the King

A landmark structure of the 1950s, at the civic heart of this planned interwar estate. Internally, the church is little altered.

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Bristol - Holy Cross

A notable interwar design in Byzantine style by John Bevan Jr, completed in a contextual manner in the early 1960s. The priest who built the church accurately described it as ‘a little Westminster Cathedral … dignified but not pretty’. The impressive interior is notable for its baldacchino, brickwork detailing and stained glass.

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Bristol - Our Lady of Lourdes and St Bernadette

A functional brick design of the late 1930s, originally intended to become a school assembly hall.  

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Bristol - St Augustine of Canterbury

A large suburban church built at the time of the Second Vatican Council, on a traditional longitudinal plan but from the outset with a forward altar. The design and construction are modern, while also referencing traditional Gothic and basilican forms. The church is a local landmark.

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Bristol - St Bonaventure

A large town church in thirteenth-century Gothic style, built at the start of the twentieth century for the Franciscans by Pugin & Pugin. The architecture has an appropriate Franciscan austerity, with a tall and stately interior. The historic sanctuary furnishings have not survived post-Vatican II reordering, but the church retains a number of furnishings of note. With the adjoining former friary building (also by Pugin & Pugin) it occupies a prominent position in the local townscape. 

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Bristol - St Gerard Majella

A prominent and well-detailed church built by Pugin & Pugin for the Benedictines in 1909, with high quality furnishings and a high degree of completeness.  

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Bristol - St Mary-on-the-Quay

A fine neoclassical design and city landmark, begun in 1839 for the Irvingites but acquired for Roman Catholic use in 1843. The interior is a galleried box, containing a fine high altar attributed to J. F. Bentley and (somewhat incongruously) an imported Gothic font by G. E. Street. Amongst the names of parish dead recorded on a war memorial on the front of the church is George Archer-Shee, the original ‘Winslow Boy’.  

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Bristol - St Maximillian Kolbe with St Edith Stein and The Holocaust Martyrs

A simple prefabricated building, originally built in the 1950s as a hut for the cadet force of the adjacent Catholic school and converted to a place of worship in 1979. The dedication honours Catholic victims of the Nazi concentration camps. 

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Bristol - St Nicholas of Tolentino

One of the oldest Catholic churches in Bristol, built in large part to cater for Irish refugees from the Great Famine arriving in Bristol in the late 1840s. It was built in stages between 1850 and 1873 from designs by Charles Hansom. The church was dramatically reordered and extended in 2006-7. With the former presbytery, it make a positive contribution to the Old Market Conservation Area. 

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