Wellington- St John Fisher

A row of Tudor Revival almshouses of 1833, converted into a church and presbytery in the 1930s. Further extended to the rear in the 1960s and internally altered more recently, the building’s main architectural interest lies in the gabled street elevation.

Read More

Wells - St Joseph and St Teresa

A small church built from designs by Charles Hansom for a Carmelite convent. The slightly later nuns’ choir area was altered in the 1970s after the convent closed. The design of the west front, which the donor stipulated should be worthy of a cathedral city, is based on that of the Slipper chapel at Walsingham.

Read More

Westbury - St Bernadette

A small late-1930s church in a simplified Romanesque style. The building has been modernised internally and adapted to serve current needs, but some of its early character remains.

Read More

Westbury-on-Trym - Sacred Heart

A simple modern Romanesque design, built on the eve of the outbreak of World War II, which has been internally reordered on a number of occasions. The building is of local architectural and historical interest.

Read More

Weston-Super-Mare - Corpus Christi

An interwar church in Byzantine-basilican style, with an impressive brick interior and a stone-faced west elevation. The original baldacchino over the high altar has been lost but the church retains some good furnishings, including fine stained glass windows by the Harry Clarke Studios of Dublin.

Read More

Weston-Super-Mare - Our Lady of Lourdes

An interwar design in free Gothic style by Roberts & Willman, with a wide and light interior with reinforced concrete vaulting. Later additions are of a rather ad hoc character.

Read More

Weston-Super-Mare - St Joseph

A small church of the 1850s in early Gothic style by Charles Hansom, built under the patronage of Joseph Ruscombe Poole, the Bishop of Clifton’s lawyer. It was seamlessly extended in 1893 by Canon A. J. C. Scoles. The stone-built group of church, (later) presbytery and boundary wall together make a positive contribution to the local conservation area.

Read More

Whaddon - Holy Family

A small former Methodist chapel of the 1880s, acquired and adapted for Catholic use in 1990. The exterior has some modest architectural interest but the interior is functional in character.

Read More

Whitchurch, Bristol - St Bernadette

A 1960s church of highly distinctive construction and design, with a double hyperbolic paraboloid roof evoking the form of a tent. This was (until the opening of Clifton Cathedral) the most striking demonstration in the diocese of the Catholic Church’s post-Vatican II embrace of modernity. It is a landmark on one of the southern approached to Bristol. 

Read More

Wincanton - St Luke and Teresa

A large urban church built by Canon Scoles for the Carmelites, whose priory to the rear of the site he had built twenty years earlier. It replaced a smaller chapel which in 1881 had been converted from outbuildings and which survives alongside. The church contains a number of fine furnishings including the high altar, reredos and hanging rood by Percy A. Lamb, and has recently been sensitively reordered. The west front makes a notable contribution to the local townscape.

Read More

Winchcombe - St Nicholas

The main body of the church is a modest but pleasing building formed out of a small former grammar school of the 1870s. It was tastefully extended with a sanctuary and Lady Chapel in 1955. 

Read More

Wiveliscombe - St Richard of Chichester

A modest, steel-framed church built after the Second Vatican Council, within the Wiveliscombe Conservation Area. 

Read More

Woodchester - The Annunciation

A magnificent church of the 1840s, by a major Catholic architect and a testament to the deep faith of its founder. There is a fine collection of fittings and furnishings, and the building is little altered. It was the centrepiece of a complex of priory buildings, sadly mostly demolished in 1970. On the approach to the church a wayside cross of 1917 is an early example of a permanent memorial to the dead of the Great War. The church occupies a commanding position overlooking the main road.  

Read More

Wotton-under-Edge - Holy Cross

The significance of the building lies in the fact that it occupies the early nineteenth-century engine house of a former cloth mill. It is a plain stone-built industrial vernacular building which makes a positive contribution to the local conservation area. It has been adapted to become a pleasing small church with a hall on the upper floor.

Read More

Wroughton - St Joseph

One of three identical designs produced for churches in the Swindon area in a climate of post-war austerity, with later sympathetic additions. Notable features include the glass in the east window and the modern baptistery setting.  

Read More

Yate - St Paul

An interesting contemporary design of 1980, with church and hall under a single A-frame steel structure. The fitting out is functional in character. 

Read More

Yatton - St Dunstan and St Antony

A small prefabricated timber hut, used by the British Legion until acquired by the local Catholic parish after the Second World War. 

Read More

Yeovil - The Holy Ghost

A Gothic Revival church by the architect and mission priest, Canon Alexander Scoles, and one of his best designs. The church has an elaborately carved high altar and Lady Chapel altar, both of richly coloured and polished materials. A number of furnishings were installed in the 1920s, in memory of Canon Scoles, who is also commemorated in the founder’s chapel. The presbytery, also by Scoles, is slightly earlier than the church and its sacristy was used as a temporary chapel before the completion of the church. Church, presbytery and entrance archway and boundary wall form a prominent corner group.  

Read More