Bristol - St Pius X

A modern structure, fit for purpose and with a warm, welcoming interior, serving a housing estate and the wider rural hinterland to the south of Bristol. 

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Brockworth - St Patrick

A large church, square on plan, built for a new residential area shortly after the Second Vatican Council, and externally altered. It is perhaps most notable for its dalle de verre glass by Brother Gilbert Taylor of Prinknash Abbey.

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Burnham-on-Sea - Our Lady and the English Martyrs

A well-designed post-Vatican II church on an oval plan lit by an oval lantern. The rock-faced exterior has a rather fortress-like quality. The interior has been reordered, subdividing the main space, and a new entrance porch has been added.

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Calne - St Edmund

A functional 1960s structure with a laminated timber frame, housing a good collection of modern liturgical furnishings and artworks by Seán Crampton, Geoffrey Robinson and others.

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Chard - English Martyrs

A small, late Gothic Revival church and presbytery, built in the interwar years from designs by Sir Frank Wills, a former mayor of Bristol and architect of the Wills tobacco factory in Bristol.

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Cheddar - Our Lady Queen of the Apostles

A small steel-framed church built at the time of the Second Vatican Council to a conventional longitudinal design. Furnishings of note include two sculptures by the Benedictine sculptor Dom Hubert Van Zeller.

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Cheltenham - Sacred Heart of Jesus and Mary

A well-detailed but conventional design of the 1950s, combining traditional planning with modern construction techniques. The church is faced inside and out in a variety of stonework finishes, and has a light-filled interior. Apart from some sanctuary reordering, the building is little altered. It forms part of a large parish complex in a suburban area of Cheltenham.

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Cheltenham - St Gregory the Great

A fine mid-Victorian Gothic Revival cruciform church in an early fourteenth-century style by a major Catholic architect, richly treated both in its architecture and decorative elements, and making a significant contribution to the townscape of the heart of Cheltenham.

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Cheltenham - St Thomas More

A functional church-cum-hall of 1962 which was superseded by a large church building four years later. Since the demolition of the latter in 2011 the building has reverted to its original dual-purpose use.

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Chew Magna - Sacred Heart

Catholic worship in the Chew Valley continued through penal times and a chapel was built in 1806. This very modest prefabricated chapel, built in the 1960s, is its spiritual successor. Although without architectural interest, it occupies a sensitive site in the local conservation area

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Chippenham - The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin

A small interwar church of traditional appearance, one of several in the diocese by Roberts & Willman of Taunton. The vaulted interior displays a slightly unusual treatment of the space and many of the original 1930s fittings survive. The church makes a modest contribution to the local conservation area.

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Chipping Camden - St Catherine

A fine late-Victorian Gothic Revival church in a pleasing free Perpendicular style and with a distinctive saddleback tower. Its interior is little-altered and holds many furnishings of note, several by artists associated with the Chipping Campden Guild of Handicrafts (including F. L. Griggs, who co-designed the presbytery). These with the former school buildings occupy a prominent position in the historic townscape of this stone-built Cotswold town. 

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Chipping Sodbury - St Lawrence

One of the older missions in the diocese, this modest church was improvised in 1838 from a former outbuilding to a seventeenth-century inn (which is now the presbytery). The exterior of the church is vernacular in character, while the interior largely retains its mid-nineteenth-century ecclesiastical character.

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Churchdown - Our Lady of Succour

A functional red brick church of the 1990s, fit for purpose but not of architectural significance. Furnishings of note include several made at Prinknash Abbey.

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Cinderford - Our Lady of Victories

The architecturally most ambitious of the four churches served from Coleford, this is a brick-built church of the late 1930s in a stripped Gothic style by a firm of Liverpool architects. 

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Cirencester - St Peter

A stone-built late Victorian church by A. J. C. Scoles in his favoured (and by then somewhat old-fashioned) early Gothic style. The church is relatively little altered, and furnishings of note include a fine high altar and reredos by Boulton of Cheltenham. With its attached contemporary presbytery, the church makes a positive contribution to the local conservation area. 

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Clevedon - The Immaculate Conception

A large neo-Gothic church built by a group of French Franciscans who founded the mission. It was designed by the architect-priest A.J.C. Scoles, who was responsible for a number of churches in the diocese. Overlooking the cliff above the sea front, it makes a prominent and positive contribution to the local conservation area.

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Clifton, Bristol - Cathedral Church of St Peter and St Paul

The cathedral church of the diocese, and the first to be conceived and built in England after the Second Vatican Council. It is perhaps the most consistent and successful example in England of the rigorous application of modern liturgical principles to church design. In the words of the list entry, ‘Clifton Cathedral achieves a rare integration of materials and spatial quality which is remarkable for a cathedral of any period’. Its internal success is most apparent when the building is in use and full. The plan is built around a series of irregular hexagons, with the altar placed slightly off-centre. Furnishings of note include the large inscribed stone font by Simon Verity, dalle de verre glass by Henry Haig and concrete Stations of the Cross by William Mitchell. Externally, the building is a powerful landmark in the Clifton Conservation Area. 

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Coleford - St Margaret Mary

A small, aisleless brick church of the early 1930s, of functional, hall-like character.

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Corsham - St Patrick

The church began life as a mid-Victorian school, commissioned by Lord Methuen of Corsham Court and designed by H. E and A. S. Goodridge of Bath, well-known local architects with significant Catholic commissions. The exterior survives virtually unaltered. The interior has been considerably altered to suit its present function and most of the furnishings are modern. 

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