Cricklade - St Mary

A medieval parish church declared redundant in 1981 and returned to Catholic use in 1984 on a ninety-nine year lease. It is an architecturally significant building on Cricklade’s High Street and includes work of various periods from the twelfth century onwards. The return of a medieval parish church to Catholic use is relatively rare and adds to the building’s significance. Churchyard monuments include an important medieval lantern cross.

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Devizes - Immaculate Conception

A small church of two periods, designed by two well-known Catholic architects - Charles Hansom and Canon Scoles - which forms part of a significant group of Catholic buildings. A modern narthex has been added to the church but the main structure is little altered and contains some original fittings.

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Downton - Good Shepherd and Our Blessed Lady Queen of Angles - Downton

Built under post-war restrictions, the church is a utilitarian structure of little architectural interest. Associations with Trafalgar House and the descendants of Admiral Lord Nelson’s brother lend it some historical interest.

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Dulverton - St Stanislas

A small brick and timber-framed church, converted in 1955 from a disused agricultural building. The building is more significant for its associated personages and fittings than for its architectural qualities, which are modest. Unexpectedly, the architect for the conversion was Professor Albert Richardson, who was commissioned by his friend, Mrs Mary Herbert of Pixton Park, the mother-in-law of Evelyn Waugh. The church contains a number of high quality furnishings, including a crucifix by Eric Gill, a stained glass window by Evie Hone, and a statue by Septimus Waugh, son of Evelyn Waugh. The church and the adjacent former presbytery make a positive contribution to the conservation area.

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Dursley - St Dominic

A brick church in a simple round-arched style, one of several similar designs in the diocese built shortly before the Second World War from designs by Roberts & Willman of Taunton. 

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Fairford - St Thomas of Canterbury

A simple, attractive example of a Puginian Gothic rural church, built in a lancet style in the 1840s and witness to the Catholic revival at this time in the area. It forms a good group with the presbytery and the former school, designs attributed to Benjamin Bucknall, and has its own burial ground. 

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Filton, Bristol - St Teresa

A late (1960) traditional basilican design, of high townscape quality and with an atmospheric interior retaining good quality and distinctive original furnishings.

 

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Fishponds, Bristol - St Joseph

A late Gothic Revival design of the 1920s by the local architect Sir Frank Wills. The design is old-fashioned for its date, the tall and striking interior with its hammerbeam roof recalling churches of the 1860s. The high altar and reredos were designed by J. F. Bentley and N. H. J. Westlake, brought here in 1929 from a convent in Taunton.

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Frenchay, Bristol - St John Fisher

A functional church-hall of the 1950s, of no architectural or historical significance but on a large site within a conservation area which is characterised by wide open spaces and commons. 

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Frome - St Catherine

A 1960s church with a low and inconspicuous exterior, faced with concrete blocks. The interior is more welcoming, its hexagonal plan and use of laminated timber roof trusses characteristic of the period.

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Glastonbury - Our Lady St Mary of Glastonbury

A Gothic Revival design built at the onset of the Second World War on a site opposite the medieval Abbey, as a successor to the ancient shrine of our Lady of Glastonbury. The canonically crowned statue of Our Lady (by Philip Lindsey Clark) is the focus of the annual pilgrimage to Glastonbury.

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Gloucester - St Peter

A large, impressive mid-Victorian town church in Decorated Gothic style, one of the most notable works of an important Catholic architect, Gilbert R. Blount. It possesses many good fittings and furnishings, and has been carefully adapted to meet modern liturgical needs. With its prominent tower with open belfry and spire and later presbytery by A. J. C. Scoles, the church group makes a prominent and important contribution to the London Road Conservation Area. 

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Henbury, Bristol - St Antony

A very functional post-war design, not of architectural or historic interest but containing some imported furnishings of note. 

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Ilminster - St Joseph

A small post-war chapel of ease, of fairly functional design.

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Keynsham - St Dunstan

A plain modern Romanesque design of the interwar years, with Art Deco touches, by Roberts & Willman of Taunton. Furnishings of note including recent Byzantine-style murals by Marcelo Lavallen.  

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Lavington - St Joseph

The church was built as a Wesleyan Methodist memorial chapel in 1900 in the free Gothic style popular for chapels at that time. It was adapted to serve as a Catholic church in 1971. The original patrons were the Holloway brothers, directors of a leading London building firm. The church is of some interest both for its architecture and its associations, and makes a positive contribution to the local conservation area.

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Lawrence Weston, Bristol - Our Lady of the Rosary

An economical design of the early 1950s, its Italianate bell tower a local landmark. The church complex is located close to Kingsweston House and serves a large post-war housing estate.

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Lydney - St Joseph

A modest, functional brick church of the 1970s with laminated roof trusses, on a large and prominent site.

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Malmesbury - St Aldhelm

A simple Gothic design of 1875, with a charming and characterful interior containing some furnishings of note. The church and adjoining presbytery make a positive contribution to the Malmesbury Conservation Area.

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Marlborough - St Thomas More

A small and functional reinforced concrete-framed, brick-clad design of the late 1950s, with some furnishings of note.

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