Matson - St Augustine of Canterbury

Built just before the Second Vatican Council, to a traditional plan and with modern construction techniques, to serve a post-war housing estate. Typical of its date, the church is notable above all for its fine collection of dalle de verre glass by the Whitefriars and Prinknash Abbey studios.

 

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Melksham - St Anthony of Padua

A plain but nicely-detailed modern Romanesque design, one of several in the diocese built just before the onset of the Second World War by Roberts & Willman of Taunton. The church has been extended at the rear but otherwise retains much of its original character.

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Minehead - Sacred Heart

A small Gothic Revival church in Early English style, one of several churches in the diocese by Canon A. J. C. Scoles. Externally modest, the church has rich and elaborate sanctuary furnishings and a full set of stained glass windows by Hardman & Co. of Birmingham. The church and the slightly later presbytery make a positive contribution to the conservation area.

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Nailsea - St Francis of Assisi

A multi-purpose building of the 1980s with attached presbytery. In 2000, a matching hall was constructed. The glazing strips of the roof are a distinctive feature which also appears in the same architect’s church at Wootton Bassett.  

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Newent - Our Lady of Lourdes

A modest building built in the late 1950s, largely with volunteer effort, and adapted in 2006-7, with some striking timber sanctuary furnishings. 

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Nympsfield - St Joseph

A small, aisleless stone church built in the 1920s using elements of a design prepared forty-five years earlier by Charles Hansom, and consequently old-fashioned for its date. The church is one of several examples in the village of the patronage of the sisters Blanche and Beatrice Leigh of Woodchester. Nicely detailed, it is set in a churchyard and makes a positive contribution to the character of the local conservation area. Furnishings of note include a medieval font and remains of a piscina and a fine east window by Edward Payne. 

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Painswick - Our Lady and St Therese

A building of Tudor origin, later used as a slaughterhouse and from the 1930s as a church. It was remodelled in classical style in the 1950s, providing a pleasing interior redolent of a late Georgian Catholic chapel. The church retains a number of furnishings acquired by Alice Howard, who drove the campaign to build a tasteful place of Catholic worship in Painswick. The stone frontage and elegant cupola make a notable contribution at the heart of the Painswick Conservation Area. 

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Peasedown - St Joseph

A small church of the 1980s, not of architectural or historic interest. Furnishings include three sculptures by Peter Watts. 

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Pewsey - Holy Family

A low-budget but well-detailed 1960s church of A-frame construction, with a high-peak copper roof. 

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Portishead - St Joseph

A small church built to serve a mission founded by French Franciscans. It was designed by the architect-priest Canon Scoles in his favoured lancet Gothic style. The sanctuary retains most elements of a good 1950s reordering.

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Postlip - St James

Of considerable significance as a small, two-cell Norman chapel, restored to Catholic use at the end of the nineteenth century when ornate carved stone decoration was applied internally. The chapel forms part of an important historic group with Postlip Hall and its medieval tithe barn. 

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Redfield, Bristol - St Patrick

A church of the 1990s, not architecturally distinguished, but with a truly remarkable interior, an amalgam incorporating newly-commissioned as well as re-used furnishings and artworks.

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Royal Wootton Bassett - Sacred Heart

A thoughtful design of the 1990s, its plan forming a sequence of polygonal spaces, with a strong diagonal axis accentuated by the top lighting. The church lies outside the historic core of the town, but within the conservation area.   

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Salisbury - St Gregory and the English Martyrs

A plain interwar church by Roberts & Willman of Taunton, with good carved figures on the main front and a functional interior with concrete frame exposed to view.

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Salisbury - St Osmund

Salisbury was the place of A. W. Pugin’s reception into the Catholic Church in 1835. His church of St Osmund is strategically placed just outside the Cathedral Close and is the focus of a group which makes a significant contribution to the local conservation area. The church was enlarged and altered in a sympathetic manner in the 1890s by E. Doran Webb, another architect with local connections. Much of the original character of the building survives, with original and later furnishings of note, although there have been losses. 

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Salisbury - The Most Holy Redeemer

A small and striking modern church of some architectural quality by a well-regarded architectural practice.  The impressive interior has been little altered.

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Sedbury - Sacred Heart

A church of the late 1980s of modern, convenient and quietly pleasing design, but not of special architectural or heritage significance.

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Shepton Mallet - St Michael

A modern steel-framed church with attached contemporary presbytery, built in a corner of Langhorne Park, site of a convent. Shepton Mallet was one of the earliest missions in the diocese, and the present church is the successor to a Georgian Gothick chapel of 1801-04.

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Shirehampton, Bristol - St Bernard

A flint Gothic church of the early twentieth century, extended (but not completed) in contextual style between the wars. An unsatisfactory narthex addition of 1973 was refurbished, and other alterations carried out, in 2010. The church occupies a corner site and makes a positive contribution to the local street scene.  

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Somerton - St Dunstan

A modest church of traditional architectural character, built shortly after the Second Vatican Council on a square plan.

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