South Petherton - St Michael

A post-war chapel-of-ease of temporary character which has been given a more permanent look by the rebuilding of the gable end in stone, incorporating a window by John Reyntiens.

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Southdown - St Joseph

A small suburban church with integral hall below, built a few years after the Second Vatican Council. The interior is more distinguished than the exterior. Furnishings of note include a carved and painted panel made for the temporary Lady Chapel at Our Lady and St Alphege’s church, Bath. 

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Soutmead, Bristol - St Vincent de Paul

A plain post-war design, occupying a prominent position in the top corner in the open space of Glencoyne Square and lent townscape value by an elegant bell tower. 

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St Catherine of Siena and St Thomas Aquinas - Bristol University Chaplaincy

A small, low-key chapel of the 1960s, the street elevation faced in stone to blend with the university chaplaincy, to which it is attached. The chapel is not of architectural or historic interest, but the chaplaincy is a substantial listed property occupying a prominent position in the university quarter and conservation area. 

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Stonehouse - St Joseph

A broadly fan-shaped design of the mid-1960s, displaying the influence of Coventry Cathedral but also embodying ideas stimulated by the Second Vatican Council. The well-lit, welcoming interior contains some furnishings of note.

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Stow-on-the-Wold - Our Lady and St Kenelm

A small and plain 1830s Tudor-style building which was originally a Church of England school with school house. Acquired for Catholic use in the twentieth century, it has been completely refitted in recent times and has a clean, light interior. The building makes a positive contribution to the local conservation area.

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Stroud - Immaculate Conception

A large Gothic Revival church of the 1850s in a Geometrical style of c.1300 by a well-known Catholic architect. It has an impressive, spacious interior with some fine fittings, including a G. F. Bodley organ case.

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Swindon - Holy Family

A post-Vatican II church built to serve a suburban housing estate, square on plan and with a central altar lit by a raised lantern/clerestory. 

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Swindon - Holy Rood

A Decorated Gothic design of the early twentieth century by E. Doran Webb, nicely detailed in flint and stone, with a squat tower. In c1970 the nave was demolished and the main body of the church rebuilt on a north-south axis. This later addition is notable above all for an extensive scheme of dalle de verre glass by Dom. Charles Norris. The church contains many furnishings of note, some imported. The Arts and Crafts presbytery and school form part of a large Catholic complex. 

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Swindon - St Mary

One of three identical designs produced for churches in the Swindon area in a climate of post-war austerity, and the only one which survives in its original form. The glass in the east window is a notable feature. 

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Swindon - St Peter

A 1980s church built to a longitudinal plan, with the top-lit altar placed along the long axis. The utilitarian design is enlivened internally by colourful furnishings and artworks. There is also a medieval font. 

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Taunton - St George

A fine, large urban church in Decorated Gothic style, with a prominent and slightly later tower. The stately interior contains a number of important furnishings and fittings, including the reredos (attributed to C. F. Hansom), a stained glass window by Morris & Co., and a west window by Patrick Reyntiens. The church forms a good group with the adjacent rectory.

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Taunton - St Teresa of Lisieux

A striking and unusual modern-traditional design, combining Scandinavian and neo-Georgian elements, built to serve a post-war housing estate. The interior is well-detailed and retains a number of original fittings, such as the brackets holding the lights, and the elaborate font. The tapering tower with spirelet is a local landmark.

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Tetbury - St Michael

A small stone-built chapel, originally built for the Strict Baptists in 1872 and acquired for Catholic use in 1941. The interior is plain and contains no furnishings of particular note; the primary significance of the church lies in its contribution to the street scene and conservation area. 

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Tewkesbury - St Joseph

A modest church occupying a 1930s former telephone exchange. The conversion was undertaken in 1977 and a narthex added in 2012. The building has no special architectural or historic interest but offers a light and welcoming space for worship.

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Thornbury - Christ the King

A modern design of 1962-4, incorporating later slab glass made at Prinknash Abbey. The church has been extended. It was built in the garden of Porch House, an important building of late medieval origin, which serves as the presbytery and parish hall. 

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Tilsbury - The Sacred Heart

A modest Gothic church of the 1890s designed by Canon A. J. C. Scoles and largely paid for by the Arundell family of Wardour. The interior is well detailed and several of the original fitting survive. The church makes a pleasing contribution to the local conservation area. 

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Trowbridge - St John the Baptist

An early church by A. J. C. Scoles, and unusually for him in Decorated Gothic style. Originally built in part to serve the needs of soldiers in the Trowbridge garrison, the building has seen several phases of enlargement and alteration, most recently in the 1990s. These have considerably changed its character, but the building remains of local interest, and makes a positive contribution to the conservation area. 

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Tuffley - English Martyrs

A modern, functional steel-framed church with a pleasant, welcoming interior. A reredos panel by the Hardman firm comes from the previous (1947) church

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Wardour - All Saints

An important, substantial and little-altered eighteenth-century private chapel. It was built discreetly within one of the wings of a large mansion designed by James Paine for the eighth Lord Arundell, whose family had provided a local focus of Catholicism since the 1540s. Much of the interior ornament is by the Roman Giacomo Quarenghi. Paine’s chapel was subsequently enlarged by John Soane. The chapel was served by the Jesuits from its opening until 1936 and again from 1946 to 2003. 

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