Abbeydale, Sheffield - Mother of God and St Wilfrid

Built in Early English Gothic style by the Sheffield architects Hemsoll & Paterson, the church opened in 1901 as Abbeydale Congregational Church. It has been in Roman Catholic use since 1952, and was extensively reordered by John Rochford & Partners in 1980. The church and adjoining former school (by the same architects) are prominent features in the local townscape.  

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Armthorpe - Our Lady of Sorrows and St Francis

A post-war church built to serve a mining community, a design very much of its time and retaining many of its original furnishings.

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Askern - Blessed English Martyrs

The church was built to serve a mining community in 1940. It has an austere external appearance, not enhanced by security measures. Its isolated location means that the church does not contribute strongly to the street scene in the village.  

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Bamford - Our Lady of Sorrows

A good example of a rural school/chapel in a low-key Elizabethan style, designed by an architect of note. The church is of historical interest for its association with Derwent Hall, the patronage of the Duke of Norfolk and the Catholic mission in the local area. The building makes a positive contribution to the local conservation area, and is located within the Peak District National Park. 

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Barnsley - Blessed Sacrament

A modest dual-purpose church and hall, one of many such examples built on post-war housing estates to serve growing Catholic communities in the 1950s. 

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Barnsley - Holy Rood

A fine Gothic design of the turn of the twentieth century by the Bradford architect Edward Simpson, prominently located on a corner site and creating a strong visual presence in the townscape. The stately and little-altered interior is richly fitted out in marble and alabaster, with notable contributions by Gabriel Pippet of Solihull and R. B. Wall of Cheltenham amongst others. 

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Barnsley - Our Lady and St James

A small Gothic Revival design of the turn of the twentieth century, built for Anglican worship and acquired for Roman Catholic use in the 1970s. The simple interior has heavy trussed roofs and fine wall paintings by Powell Brothers. 

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Bristol - Holy Family

A church of the time of the Second Vatican Council, modern in construction but conventional in plan. It occupies a large site in a prominent position overlooking a roundabout. 

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Carcroft - St George and the English Martyrs

A dual-purpose church and hall built in the 1960s. The design provides a well-lit interior and flexible space. The panel at the entrance is said to be the first of its kind in the country made by Formica.

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Chesterfield - Holy Family

A modest interwar structure, testament to the generosity and commitment of a parishioner who gave the land and built the church. 

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Chesterfield - St Hugh of Lincoln

A multipurpose worship centre of the mid-1960s, with a simple and dignified worship space which can be expanded to cater for larger congregations or subdivided to allow for other uses. 

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Chesterfield - The Annunciation

An interesting and important work of J. A. Hansom, which although built incrementally retains architectural coherence and a powerful presence. The interior is visually striking and incorporates good quality stained glass and statuary, although post-Vatican II reordering was unsympathetic. With Samuel Rollinson’s presbytery and former school, the church forms a distinctive group in the Spencer Street Conservation Area.

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Clowne - Sacred Heart

A plain dual-purpose post-war church and hall by the prolific firm of Reynolds & Scott.

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Cudworth - St Mary Madgdalene

A plain design by John Rochford, notable above all for its David John furnishings.

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Dalton - St Teresa

A simple and economical red brick building built at a time of building restrictions soon after the Second World War, to serve a mining community. 

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Deepcar - St Anne

A small stone-built church in fourteenth century Gothic style by Hadfield & Goldie. The exterior retains much of its original character, but the interior has been much altered and extended in phases, with a major reordering in 1968. 

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Denaby Main - St Alban

A Gothic Revival design of the 1890s, built to serve a colliery community, and part of a large complex which includes a contemporary presbytery. The interior has been little altered since the mid-twentieth century and contains a good collection of furnishings from different periods. 

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Dinnington - St Joseph

An early twentieth century red brick church in Lombard Romanesque style, built for a mining community and significantly enlarged in the 1950s. The church makes a positive contribution to the local streetscape.  

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Doncaster - Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St Mary Magdalen

A Gothic Revival church of the 1950s by Robert A. Ronchetti, very old-fashioned for its date but nonetheless a design of quality. The church is located in a prominent position in the townscape, with the raised bellcote providing a local landmark in an area of 1930s housing.

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Doncaster - Our Lady of Perpetual Help

A good and little-altered church of the late 1950s, an early work by John Rochford & Partners. Longitudinal in plan and modern in its construction, the interior is light and spacious, with many of its original furnishings. 

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