Oldcotes - St Helen

An attractive Gothic Revival design of the 1860s by S. J. Nicholl, built at the expense of Edward Chaloner of Hermeston Grange, a Liverpool timber merchant. The church and linked contemporary presbytery are set within a burial ground and a scheduled ancient monument, the site of a Roman villa. Together the buildings and open space form a pleasing group in the local townscape and conservation area.

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Our Lady Queen of Heaven and St Oswald - Wybourne, Sheffield

A pleasing low-key design of the 1950s by R. A. Ronchetti, built to serve an interwar housing estate. 

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Padley - Padley Chapel

An important example of a fifteenth century domestic gatehouse with an upper chapel, part of a larger complex which has since been largely lost. More important in the Catholic context are its associations with the recusant Fitzherbert family and the sixteenth century martyrdom of Blessed Nicholas Garlick and Blessed Robert Ludlum. The restoration of the building as a pilgrimage chapel during the 1930s was carried out in sympathetic manner and the building continues to honour the memory of the martyrs. It exhibits original medieval architectural features, good stained glass largely by the Hardman firm and other fixtures of quality. The associated ruins act as an auditorium and setting for pilgrimage events.

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Penistone - St Mary

An economical, prefabricated design with a laminated timber roof structure, one of many such designs built by the firm of Lanner of Wakefield in the 1960s.

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Rawmarsh - St Joseph

Designed as a dual-purpose church and hall, but used from early on exclusively as a church, this modest post-war building has a light and spacious interior with an original tiled reredos at the east end, but is not of great architectural or historical significance. 

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Retford - St Joseph

A distinctive modern Romanesque design of the 1950s by E. Bower Norris, incorporating Art Deco elements. The church was reordered in 1968 by Gerard Goalen, when a fine large sculpture by Stephen Sykes was introduced. St Joseph’s is prominently located in the Retford Conservation Area, its campanile serving as a local landmark. With the adjacent cemetery it has high townscape value.

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Rossington - Christ the King

An interwar design of presence and individuality, occupying a prominent position within the model village of New Rossington. 

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Rotherham - Forty Martyrs

An economical post-Vatican II design, outwardly unprepossessing but with a striking interior with floating roof structure. 

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Rotherham - Immaculate Conception (St Mary)

A large post-war church by Robert A Ronchetti with an impressive, largely brick-faced interior. The church is on a raised site and with the large crucifix on the north elevation makes a strong contribution to the local townscape. 

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Rotherham - St Bede

Built in the early 1840s by Fr (later Bishop) James Sharples, and a key building in the architectural development of Weightman & Hadfield. The church was commended by A. W. Pugin for its correct plan and demonstration of true Christian principles. Later additions by Charles Hadfield are sensitively executed, and more recently an extensive scheme of stained glass windows has been introduced.

 

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Sheffield - Sacred Heart

A striking, monumental interwar design by C. M. Hadfield in modern Romanesque style, with Art Deco massing. High quality furnishings include mosaics by Eric Newton and sculptures by Philip Lindsey Clark.

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Sheffield - Cathedral Church of St Marie

The Cathedral Church of the Diocese of Hallam, and the finest Gothic Revival Church in the City of Sheffield. The church was opened in 1850, year of the restoration of the Roman Catholic hierarchy in England and Wales. Designed by M. E. Hadfield of the local firm of Weightman & Hadfield, it is a fine essay in the approved (by Pugin and the ecclesiologists) ‘Middle Pointed’ style, a stately composition whose chief glory externally is the slender stone spire rising from a square tower at the southwest corner. The church was built with support from the Duke of Norfolk and his family and despite some loss of historic furnishings (notably in a reordering of the early 1970s) represents something of a roll call of major Catholic ecclesiastical designers of the nineteenth century – including A. W. Pugin, Hardman & Co., William Wailes, Boulton of Cheltenham, Mayer of Munich and J. F. Bentley. The church was raised to cathedral status in 1980, a development commemorated with fine stained glass by Patrick Reyntiens, and in 2012 was sympathetically reordered. With the early twentieth century Cathedral House it makes a notable positive contribution to the City Centre Conservation Area.    

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Sheffield - Holy Family

A post-war dual-purpose suburban church and hall of utilitarian design.

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Sheffield - Our Lady of Lourdes

A large church built by Reynolds & Scott to serve a post-war housing estate, its design a modern interpretation of Gothic. The interior is light and spacious, with the reinforced concrete frame expressed, and was sympathetically reordered by John Rochford & Partners in the 1970s. The exterior is bold and striking rather than subtle or delicate, but is nevertheless a local landmark.

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Sheffield - St Anthony

A functional dual-purpose church and hall, built to serve a new post-war suburb from designs by Reynolds & Scott, the most prolific Catholic church architects of the post-war period.

 

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Sheffield - St Catherine of Alexandria

A large and well-detailed Italian Romanesque design of the interwar period, well encapsulating the confidence and triumphalism of Catholic expansion at that time. The building takes full advantage of its favourable siting (on land given by the Duke of Norfolk) and has a richly furnished interior, with marble baldacchino and other sanctuary furnishings of note. 

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Sheffield - St Charles Borromeo

An economical stone-built Gothic design of the 1870s and eighties, by local architects of note, with an attached contemporary presbytery. The church has been little altered and contains an interesting and eclectic collection of furnishings. The former school behind the church now houses the diocesan offices and Pastoral Centre. 

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Sheffield - St Francis of Assisi

An impressive multipurpose church, hall and presbytery of the late 1980s, with a striking hexagonal form and interior with contemporary furnishings.  

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Sheffield - St Michael's Cemetery Chapel

A cemetery chapel of 1877-8 by the notable Catholic architect Charles Hadfield, largely paid for a local donor, with notable furnishings by Boulton, Westlake and J. F. Bentley.  The cemetery was the first dedicated Catholic cemetery in Sheffield and opened in 1862. Located on a sloping hillside in Rivelin Glen, the cemetery retains many monuments and mature planting and is of considerable evidential, historical, aesthetic and communal value. 

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Sheffield - St Patrick

A stripped modern design rooted in historic forms, the apse and tapering tower serving as a local landmark. The austere character of the exterior is continued inside. Building of the church started at the outset of the Second World War and was completed fifteen years later.

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