Alnwick - St Paul

A mid-nineteenth century church by Anthony Salvin, acquired for Catholic use in the 1980s. As the Church of England’s 1980 report states, ‘The church is a large, straightforward and serious minded essay in the Decorated style which is more striking for its size and dignity than for any ingenuity in detail of plan’. It is important historically for its place in the nineteenth century expansion of Alnwick, which was supported by the Third Duke of Northumberland whose fine cenotaph remains in the north chancel chapel. 

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Amble - Sacred Heart and St Cuthbert

A useful building that has been expanded and embellished over the years, but with modest architectural interest and character. The small remains of the Manor House in the garden to the south and the well below the church are important survivals of Amble’s early history.

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Annfield Plain - St Teresa

A plain brick church with attached presbytery, both of 1953. The church was extended in 1972.

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Annitsford - St John the Baptist

A remarkable interpretation of a French Rayonnant church in English architectural dress. The interior is tall and narrow with a handsome roof, culminating in a chancel with Belgian woodwork.

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Ashington - St Aidan

An early twentieth century church built by the Benedictines, from designs by Charles Walker. Although economically built, the building has clean, almost austere architectural lines and stands well on its corner site; it is the largest building in this part of Ashington. The spacious interior was richly embellished in the 1920s with woodwork by the Italian firm of Stuflesser.

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Backworth - Our Lady and St Edmund

A modest basilican design of the post-war years.

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Bedlington - St Bede

A notable church design of the 1990s, with an impressive interior with some dramatic lighting focussing on key fittings that are works of art. Despite its scale, the church is somewhat hidden and plays little part in the urban landscape, but is just within the Bedlington conservation area. 

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Bellingham - St Oswald

The church dates from 1839, the Catholic mission from 1794. The church is a lancet Gothic design by Ignatius Bonomi and is a valuable ‘full-stop’ to the village settlement, taking full advantage of its corner site and forming a group with the presbytery and school. The interest is primarily external, the interior plain and simple. 

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Bells Close, Newcastle-upon-Tyne - St George

The church was donated by the local landowner, and was commissioned from a distinguished firm of architects who worked widely in the diocese. It is the second oldest building in the area, after the nearby Anglican church of 1837. Architecturally, the church is an example of the polychromatic brick Gothic style promoted by G. E. Street and others. 

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Benton - St Aidan

The church is a modest structure, built as a parish hall in 1963. It lies within the medieval village, which by the nineteenth century had a number of stone-built villas with large gardens, of which the present presbytery is one. 

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Berwick-upon-Tweed - Our Lady and St Curthbert

An architecturally modest church externally, which demonstrates the history of Roman Catholicism in Berwick by being hidden away from the street in 1829 and almost doubled in size and embellished in the 1880s. The wooden tracery of the nave windows is a relatively rare survival and the stonework of the apse and the quirky 1925 Sacred Heart Chapel are of a high quality.

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Billingham - Our Lady of the Most Holy Rosary

A good example of the post-war churches of Thomas Crawford, with a strong west front and attractive brickwork. The conventionally planned interior is well-lit and retains some good quality, but plain fittings; the 1970s reordering complements the interior.   

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Billingham - St John the Evangelist

A modest example post-war church by the prolific Thomas Crawford, built next to the 1930 presbytery. The conventionally-planned interior retains some good quality, but plain fittings; the 2000 reordering complements the interior.

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Billingham - St Joseph

A prefabricated polygonal structure of the 1970s, with laminated timber frame. The seating came from Pugin & Pugin’s church at Port Clarence. 

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Birtley - St Joseph

Birtley is one of the oldest Catholic missions in County Durham, dating from the late seventeenth century. From its origins until 1977 it was served by the Benedictines. The present church replaced a building of c1791 and is a stone-built Early English Gothic design of the early 1840s by John Dobson of Newcastle. 

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Bishop Auckland - St Mary

A brick-faced, reinforced concrete church of the 1950s, traditional in plan. The church has a light and welcoming interior, with good stained glass of c1980 by Tom McGuinness. The building contributes well to the character of the local area.

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Bishop Auckland - St Paulinus

A cheaply-built church and hall of the 1950s, incorporating a stone-built early Victorian building, possibly a schoolroom.  

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Bishop Auckland - St Wilfrid

A stone-built Gothic church from the early days of the resurgence of Catholic church-building in the 1840s, with later nineteenth century additions, notably of 1890. It is fairly conventional architecturally but has a wide and impressive interior space. The church and its linked Gothic presbytery of 1867 make a positive contribution to the Bishop Auckland Conservation Area. 

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Blackhall - St Joseph

A very simple church of the 1950s, replacing an earlier church on a different site, with a modern hall addition of 2000.

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Blackhill - Our Blessed Lady Immaculate

A large Gothic Revival church and the earliest church by A.M. Dunn, a prominent Catholic architect of the North East. The main decorative features are the paintings on the chancel arch and on the chancel ceiling (both 1860s). The church also has some original stained glass and statues by Mayer of Munich. The tall bell tower, whose upper stages were a later addition to the church, is a local landmark.

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