Seaham Harbour - St Mary Magdalen

An early example of the use of moulded concrete blocks, used in this case to build a church in the Romanesque style with a handsome basilican interior. The church is almost identical in design, construction and date to St Joseph, Sunderland. 

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Seahouses - St Aidan

A 1972 purpose-built modest brick church that creates a pleasant worship space with some interesting and good quality stained glass.

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Shildon - St Thomas the Apostle

An inter-war brick church, quite cheap and small in scale and with some simple, but imaginatively treated, architectural detail. The interior is particularly appealing and welcoming.

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Shotley Bridge - Our Lady of the Rosary

A small post-war church with an attached parish hall. It is a simple round-arched design by Anthony J. Rossi, built early in his career and before he developed his distinctive later style.  The sanctuary has a large painting of the Virgin Mary by local artist Sheila Mackie. The church makes a positive contribution to the Shotley Bridge Conservation Area.

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Shotton - Our Lady of Lourdes

A design-and-build church of the early 1980s, with a wide, low interior.

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Silksworth - St Leonard

A good ‘chaste and correct’ Early English church and attached presbytery by George Goldie, set within a burial ground. Unusually for Catholic churches at this time, the church, presbytery and school were paid for by a single donor, the convert Lady Priscilla Beckwith of Silksworth House. 

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South Shields - Holy Rosary

A large conventional post-war church erected shortly after the Second Vatican Council. The church has been reordered and subdivided to form a weekday chapel.

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South Shields - Ss Peter and Paul

An early twentieth-century neo-Romanesque church serving the Tyne Dock area, built by the Hull practice of Brodrick, Lowther & Walker. The church has landmark value due to its location high above Boldon Lane. It has historical associations with the local author Catherine Cookson. 

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South Shields - St Bede

A large and distinguished urban Gothic Revival church, despite the unfinished bell tower. The church contains stained glass windows from the predecessor chapel, which was converted for Catholic use in 1849. Both the church and the adjacent brick presbytery have landmark value.

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South Shields - St Gregory

A plain inter-war church which was extended and re-orientated in 1982. It contains several pieces of sculpture by local artist Fenwick Lawson.

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South Shields - St Oswald

A modern church notable for its sculptural volume, built at the time of the Second Vatican Council. Major alterations were carried out by the original architect in the 1980s. It has several high-quality furnishings, including a window by Fourmaintraux and Stations of the Cross made of glass. The freestanding tower at the west provides a visual accent. 

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Stanley - St Joseph

A large Gothic Revival church by Charles Walker of Newcastle, set within an earlier burial ground. The Towneley family gave the land and donated several furnishings. Subsidence problems due to underground mining works prevented the later addition of a tower. 

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Stockton-on-Tees - St Bede

Built shortly after World War II and despite an evidently modest budget, displaying an enterprising plan and handling of spaces, creating a refreshing and interesting interior. However, it is not a building of special architectural or historical significance. 

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Stockton-on-Tees - St Cuthbert

One of the better post-war churches designed by the prolific architect Thomas Crawford, with a confident west front addressing Yarm Road. The conventionally planned interior is well-lit and retains some good quality fittings; the 1990s reordering complements the interior.   

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Stockton-on-Tees - St Joseph

An interwar church built on the site of the stables and coach house of Ragworth Hall, in a simple revival style which contributes to the street scene in Norton. The interior was substantially reordered and a new parish hall built in 1993. The design standard of the new work is high, but apart from some historic fittings, the interior now has little heritage significance.  

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Stockton-on-Tees - St Mary

A large, accretive Gothic Revival church, ranging in date from 1841 to 1909. Its most significant phase is the first, by A. W. Pugin, but this is now discernible only in the roof and external west end of the nave. 

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Stockton-on-Tees - St Patrick

A typical post-Vatican II church built to serve a large housing estate, altered in the 1990s. It was economically built using a durable brick and has a functional interior with few features of heritage or artistic value.

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Stockton-on-Tees - The English Martyrs and St Peter and St Paul

A modest 1950s church design, built for a post-war housing estate.  It has a pleasing, if conventional interior with some attractive fittings and works of art. The building contributes positively to the street scene. 

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Sunderland - Holy Family

A functional but well-designed church of the 1960s, reflecting the liturgical changes ushered in with the Second Vatican Council. There are some furnishings of note. 

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Sunderland - Holy Rosary

A simple brick design of the 1950s, built to serve a post-war housing estate. Its elevated position beside a major road gives it a certain degree of prominence. The character of the interior has been compromised by a suspended ceiling in the nave, but the ‘Mouseman’ Thompson furnishings are worthy of note.  

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