Blaydon - Ss Mary and Thomas Aquinas

An early Catholic church building with a castellated villa-like presbytery concealing the church behind; a curious throwback to pre-Emancipation times, when Catholic churches were often concealed so as not to attract attention.  

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Blaydon-on-Tyne - St Joseph

A large and strikingly-sited early twentieth century Gothic Revival church by Charles Walker of Newcastle, with an elaborate interior with hammerbeam roof. The church and presbytery were built primarily through a generous legacy from Mrs Blanche Leadbitter of Ryton. 

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Blyth - Our Lady and St Wilfrid

A large, but well massed church built for the Benedictines from designs by A.M. Dunn. The large expanse of continuous roof creates a presence in the townscape (and is nicely balanced by the tall URC spire opposite). The interior has good glass and although the roof is visually weak, the fully detailed east and west end arrangements give it some grandeur. Recent changes have re-established some of the c.1900 character of the sanctuary.

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Brooms - Our Blessed Lady and St Joseph

A large Victorian church by E.W. Pugin, replacing a late eighteenth-century chapel (now the sacristy). The presbytery is of the same date as the original chapel. Pugin’s church has a spacious interior with a scissor braced roof and a wide chancel arch affording clear views of the altar. The Caen stone high altar and reredos survive, along with a Gothic altar in a side chapel. 

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Byermoor - Sacred Heart

A small but substantial Victorian Gothic church of the 1870s built to serve a mining community which has now disappeared.  The building is a competent Gothic design by a well-known Newcastle practice and retains a number of original or early furnishings. 

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Chester-le-Street - St Cuthbert

A good, well-detailed Neo-Romanesque design of the early twentieth century, about which information is surprisingly elusive. Chester-le-Street was the site of the shrine of St Cuthbert before the translation of the saint’s body to Durham, hence the dedication. 

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Chopwell - Our Lady of Lourdes

A simple functional modern church building of little architectural interest.

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Consett - St Patrick

A post-war church in the Early Christian style, designed by local architect Anthony J. Rossi. Several furnishings were sourced by the architect in Italy. The hall is the earliest surviving parish building and was built in c.1870 as a senior RC school.

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Consett - St Pius

A small modern church of 2009. 

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Coundon - St Joseph

A 1930s brick church with a traditional basilican plan. Although not of special architectural interest, it is has strong presence in its immediate area. It has a harmonious interior with some good marble work lining the sanctuary walls.

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Cowpen - St Cuthbert

A Gothic Revival design converted from an old cow barn, originally by John Dobson and much altered in the later nineteenth and early twentieth century. The building is of substantial historical interest as the church of the earliest Benedictine mission in the immediate area and the church and burial place of the Sidney family, whose patronage of the Catholic faith was so important in the middle years of the nineteenth century. 

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Coxhoe - SS Joseph, Patrick and Cuthbert

A distinctive but nonetheless mainstream design of the 1960s, by a Newcastle architect who built a number of churches in the diocese. The external gabled silhouette and the internal vaulting are striking elements of the design. The interior has a somewhat chilly character, which the present parish priest has sought to mitigate through richer colour schemes and new furnishings in the sanctuary.  

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Cramlington - St Paul

A modern building that fits in well with the surrounding new town estate it was built to serve. The interior is adequately furnished but is designed to serve large congregations with little subsidiary space, though has modern accessible facilities.

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Crawcrook - St Agnes

A 1950s brick church in the modern Romanesque manner, with an Italianate tower. The church occupies a prominent site, on land acquired from the Dunn family.

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Crook - Our Lady Immaculate and St Cuthbert

A substantial Gothic Revival church of the mid-1850s by E.W. Pugin, with an interior of much beauty. The contemporary presbytery is also by Pugin. Together the buildings have a fine presence on the outskirts of Crook, and make a positive contribution to the local conservation area. 

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Cullercoats - St Mary

The church was built in 1970 to serve the expanding population of this part of the North Tyneside conurbation. The building is square on plan, with the sanctuary placed on the diagonal. It is a fairly late work by Anthony J. Rossi. 

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Darlington - Holy Family

A red brick church of 1960 of traditional plan, with a plain exterior and a pleasing simple, light interior.

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Darlington - St Anne

A 1950s brick-built church for a housing estate. It has clean, simple lines and a light, welcoming interior but is not a building of architectural or historic significance.

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Darlington - St Augustine

One of the oldest Catholic churches in the diocese still in use for regular worship; largely concealed behind the surrounding buildings, the church grew from a modest chapel of the 1820s. 

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Darlington - St Teresa

A brick-built church of 1970 with an interesting plan and architectural geometry. It displays its architect’s moving away from the traditional longitudinal plan adopted in his buildings of the mid-1960s towards a more intimate plan geared towards the demands of the new liturgy.

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