Darlington - St Thomas Aquinas

A 1920s suburban, red brick church in a sub-Gothic style, which has been much altered. 

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Darlington - St William and St Francis de Sales

A large and impressive red-brick school-chapel of 1870-71 built as a memorial to Bishop Hogarth. It is of historical interest as a rare surviving example of a once-common building type, which was important in the nineteenth century provision of Catholic education and worship in places where funds were stretched. The church contains some carved work and other furnishings of note. 

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Dipton - St Patrick

A large post-Vatican II church built on the longitudinal foundations of the predecessor church but with a centralised interior. Older buildings of the church complex include the school of 1907 and the presbytery.

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Dunston - St Philip Neri

An unusual design, probably originally built in about 1905 as a timber-framed temporary church, which was re-clad with what appears to be cast artificial stone in the 1930s.  The original interior largely survives.  

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Durham - Our Lady of Mercy and St Godric

The church is dramatically positioned on a raised site close to Durham city centre, and its design takes full advantage of this. It was built in the 1860s to meet the expanding Catholic population in the city, including navvies coming to build the nearby railway viaduct. 

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Durham - St Cuthbert

One of the oldest Catholic churches in the diocese still in use for regular worship. The building slightly predates Catholic Emancipation (1829) and although not large is an expression of resurgent Catholic confidence. 

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Durham - St Joseph

A large church built at about the time of the Second Vatican Council, still traditional in plan form but well executed and detailed. 

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Easington Colliery - Our Lady

A modern combined church and hall, replacing two earlier churches on different sites. Of some architectural interest (especially internally) as an example of bold, functional 1970s church design.

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Easington Lane - St Mary

A very modest and cheaply built church of the inter-war period.

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Esh Laude - St Michael

The oldest church in the diocese still in use, built in 1798 on land given by the Smythe family (who also owned the land on which nearby Ushaw College was built). As originally designed, the group of church, presbytery and stables was designed in a deliberately low-key way, with a farmhouse character. Later alterations increased the ‘ecclesiastical’ look of the church.  The interior contains several features of note, including a wooden Gothic balcony looking towards the sanctuary from the first floor of the presbytery, and an altar in memory of Cardinal Wiseman. 

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Felling - St Patrick

Charles Walker’s finest church in the diocese and a building of cathedralesque proportions. St Patrick’s was completed in 1895, and was built to serve the largely Irish population of Catholics working on the Tyne; it is an important part of Gateshead’s history. 

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Felling - St Augustine

A striking building, both inside and out, by an architect who combined twentieth-century forms and techniques with traditional stylistic references in an interesting way. It is at the centre of an area of 1950s development. 

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Ferryhill - All Saints

A Gothic Revival church of the 192os. The budget was evidently tight but the result is nonetheless an attractive design which adds much to the character of the local area. The interior is light, open and welcoming.

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Forest Hall - St Mary

A plain but subtly-detailed church of the early 1960s, quietly contemporary in character. The interior has good, solid furnishings, and has been reorientated, with the sanctuary on the long axis. 

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Gainford - St Osmund

An 1850s Gothic Revival church, of fairly simple external appearance but with a impressive interior space. Its tall, expansive roof is covered internally in a remarkable decorative scheme, contemporary with the original construction. The church and slightly earlier presbytery occupy a large site with a burial ground, and are conspicuous features in the Gainford Conservation Area.   

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Gateshead - Corpus Christi

A large and imposing modern Gothic design on a prominent corner site. The church has a good interior, with several furnishings of note.

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Gateshead - St Anne

A dual-purpose church and hall, built in the 1970s to serve a housing estate, and incorporating some historic features of unknown provenance. 

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Gateshead - St Joseph

The mother church of Gateshead and a powerful design by A.M. Dunn. Inside, the church is of lofty proportions and contains many furnishings and fittings of note, including the original high altar reredos and a good collection of stained glass by H.M. Barnett of Newcastle.  

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Gateshead - St Peter

A simple modern church of the early 1960s, with a concrete portal frame and good internal use of materials. The presbytery is a large stone-built house of 1875 which makes a positive contribution to the local conservation area. 

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Gateshead - St Wilfrid

A small church with an unusual structural history, which retains the homely atmosphere of the old tin church it replaced. It is located in a commanding position alongside a main road in an area which has lost much of its traditional terraced housing. With the earlier stone-built presbytery to the south it is the only high status building in the immediate area. 

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