Jarrow - St Matthew

A large post-war church with a light and lofty interior, reminiscent of a hall church. The sanctuary has been re-ordered, leaving few furnishings in their original state although new furnishings were created from the original marble. 

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Langley Moor - St Patrick

A stone-built Edwardian church serving a mining town, the design of which although not original for its date is consistently high, both inside and out. The church has a good collection of glass by the Hardman firm. 

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Longbenton - Ss Peter and Paul

A large and characterful design of the early 1960s by David Brown, with a reinforced concrete frame and brick cladding. The copper roof, fleche and canted side windows lend the exterior some distinction, and the interior is light, bright and airy. 

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Longhorsley - St Thomas of Canterbury

A modest and small Gothic church by John Dobson, a valuable adjunct to the sixteenth century Tower, formerly home to two notable Catholic families.  

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Middleton-in-Tees - St Aidan

A small, utilitarian post-war structure. While no doubt serving the local Catholic community well, it is not a building of architectural or historic significance. It does, however, blend well with its setting in this large village. 

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Morpeth - St Robert of Newminster

A well-proportioned exterior of character with some interesting sculpture. Inside, the 1850 Wailes glass is of good quality, the 1860 statuary helps articulate the nave and the c.1920 altar rails by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott are particularly fine.

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Murton - St Joseph

A simple but striking 1960s church by Anthony J. Rossi, on a sloping site.  The interior is also a simple, bold architectural composition, with many of the original fittings.

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New Hartley - Our Lady and St Joseph

A pleasant and uncomplicated church which fits into the surrounding housing estate and serves its present congregation well. However, its architectural and artistic interest is modest.  

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New Seaham - St Cuthbert

An interesting design of the mid-1960s by David Brown, who was responsible for a number of modernistic churches in the diocese around the time of the Second Vatican Council. The church has a large collection of modern stained glass by Maralyn O’Keefe. 

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Newbiggin-by-the-Sea - St Mary

A pleasant and well-kept modest building of value to its congregation and with a quirky origin.

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Newcastle - St Cuthbert

A large church of 1960 by David Brown, serving an area of post-war housing. Typically of its architect, it has a large internal volume, with the reinforced concrete frame a dominant feature, while the exterior is clad in traditional materials. The church was extensively and imaginatively reordered in the 1990s by Pascal J. Stienlet & Son.

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Newcastle - St Robert

Fenham became part of Newcastle only in 1904, with the eighteenth century Fenham Hall at its heart. The parish of St Robert of Newminster was erected in 1930 and the parish hall, then surrounded by fields with no proper roads, was opened that year, serving also as a church. The present church was opened on 17 December 1955 and consecrated on 18 June 1963. 

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Newcastle-upon-Tyne - Cathedral Church of St Mary

The cathedral church of the diocese, built from designs by A. W. Pugin as a ‘large parochial church’ on the three-aisled hall church plan adopted by Pugin at St George’s, Southwark. Later additions of note include the upper stage of the tower and spire, Dunn & Hansom’s first architectural collaboration.

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Newcastle-upon-Tyne - English Martyrs

A long, tall, brick-clad church of the early 1960s, its striking interior displaying a creative use of concrete. 

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Newcastle-upon-Tyne - Our Lady and St Vincent

A small, well-detailed brick church of the 1950s. 

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Newcastle-upon-Tyne - St Andrew

A stone-built Gothic town church and presbytery, built in the 1870s from designs by Thomas Gibson. The church was a successor to the chapel built in the 1790s by Fr James Worswick, the leading figure in the modern development of the Newcastle Catholic mission.  

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Newcastle-upon-Tyne - St Anthony of Padua

A stone church in the Early English Gothic style, built in 1860 from designs by A.M. Dunn to serve a shipbuilding and coalmining community. 

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Newcastle-upon-Tyne - St Bede

Built in the 1950s to serve a housing estate, this is a modest design with some typical features of its time. 

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Newcastle-upon-Tyne - St Dominic

A majestic town church built by A.M. Dunn for the Dominicans, in transitional Romanesque-Gothic style. An intended tower and spire were never completed, but nevertheless the church and adjoining priory remain a commanding presence in the area. 

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Newcastle-upon-Tyne - St Joseph

An impressive Byzantine revival building of the interwar period. It was designed by Stienlet & Maxwell, a significant Newcastle firm, and this is their finest church in that style. 

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