Keswick - Our Lady and St Charles

A large church, solidly built of vernacular materials. Its finished appearance was partly dictated by earlier, 1928 work, and its 1960s completion is therefore perhaps old-fashioned.

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Kirkby Lonsdale - St Joseph

The building became a Catholic church only in the late 1960s, having started life in the 1860s as a Congregational chapel. Although much altered, its place in the history of the town’s development is of interest.

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Kirkham - St John the Evangelist

The church is a local landmark, designed by AWN Pugin, leading architect and advocate of the Gothic Revival in England. Significant embellishments instigated by Fr Francis Gillow.

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Knott End, Blackpool - St Bernard

A  modest  early  C20  church  with  later  additions  not  of  special  interest.  Some internal fittings of note.

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Lancaster - Cathedral Church of St Peter

Built as an ambitious parish church in the confident years after the restoration of the hierarchy, and the Cathedral since the creation of the diocese of Lancaster since 1924.  A fine, aspiring building, the chef d’oeuvre of Edward Paley. The NW steeple is a local landmark, 240 ft high and excellently detailed. Transepts and a high nave and chancel, with an interior that is quite light, yet rich and impressively proportioned.  The  style  is  that  of  c1300,  the  material  warm  buff  stone.  The baptistery on the N side is like a chapter house; it was added in 1895 by Austin & Paley, and has good group value with the main building.

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Lancaster - St Joseph

A major building by Peter Paul Pugin, erected out of the munificence of Miss Margaret Coulston. Externally a local landmark and notable for the quality of its fitting out by (amongst others), Hardman and the Gillows. 

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Lancaster - St Thomas More

A modest building, intended for use as a school hall, not of special architectural or historic interest.

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Lea Town - St Mary

One of several chapel-type churches built in the villages around Preston in the wake of the Relief Act 1791.  A simple brick box with a galleried interior, and later nineteenth century liturgical furnishings. Very unusually, the pre-Vatican liturgical arrangements remain in place and unaltered. There is a contemporary attached presbytery, extended in the later nineteenth century.

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Lichfield - St Peter and St Paul

A striking building of more civic than ecclesiastical character, demonstrably of 1966-7 and taking full advantage of its elevated position in a contemporary housing estate. A grand glazed entrance opens into the large internal space with central altar, covered by a timber ceiling that slopes down uncomfortably close to the ground. The internal furnishings and finishes do not live up to the external drama.

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Lytham - St Peter

A plain Gothic brick box, late Georgian in style, the significance of which lies perhaps above all in its townscape contribution and the various additions and embellishments which have been made to its interior over the years.

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Maryport - Our Lady and St Patrick

A modest early building, with little architectural pretension. The interior has been modernised and has little of its original character.

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Millom - Our Lady and St James

A building of modest architectural interest, but of social historical interest as a church built by the subscriptions of iron workers.

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Milnthorpe - Christ the King

A notable work by a significant post-war church building practice, with high quality furnishings.

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Morecambe - Holy Family

Post war church, not of special architectural or historic interest.

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Morecambe - St Mary

The earliest Catholic church in Morecambe, built to the designs of Pugin and Pugin. Church and presbytery make a good group in the town centre, and the interior of the church, while altered,  is pleasing.

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Morecambe - St Patrick

Large brick and reinforced concrete church of the 1960s, rare in the diocese for reflecting contemporary trends in church architecture. Internal furnishings and glass of some note.

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Newhouse - St Mary

A well detailed early C20 church in the Hansom/EW Pugin tradition but with some arts and crafts touches. Good internal furnishings, and some notable survivals from previous early C19 church. Historical associations with William Cobbett.

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Penrith - St Catherine, Virgin and Martyr

Mid nineteenth century sandstone church in Geometrical Gothic style, built partly at the expense of Fr George Haydock of Cottam. 

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Pilling - St William of York

Late C19 church of modest architectural pretensions, quite attractively grouped with adjoining presbytery.

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Poulton-le-Fylde - English Martyrs

Post war church, not of special architectural or historic interest.

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