Introduction

Diocese of Leeds

The Diocese of Leeds comprises the whole of West Yorkshire, with the exception of the parish of Todmorden, together with parishes in the East Riding, North Yorkshire, Greater Manchester and Lancashire. Below you will find 'Taking Stock' reports on the Churches and Chapels of the diocese in alphabetical order. If you can't find what you're looking, please use the search box in the top right-hand corner of this page.

Bradford - St Francis of Assisi

An interesting church of some architectural and artistic merit. Interesting as a conversion (although the Simpson work was not distinguished) and for the spatial qualities of the new church, with dramatic lighting inspired by Toledo Cathedral. Good stained glass and other fittings.

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Bradford - St John the Evangelist

A modest building, cared for and fit for purpose but of little architectural or townscape importance.

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Bradford - St Joseph

A good mainstream Gothic Revival church of the late Victorian period by a noted local architect and with an overlay of distinctive and high quality 1930s alterations.

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Bradford - St Matthew

A single-storey church of system-built construction clad in pebble-dashed or boarded panels, under a shallow-pitched concrete tiled roof.

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Bradford - St Patrick

The second Catholic church to be built in Bradford, and the oldest one still in use. With the associated convent and schools it forms part of a dense urban church group. Architecturally, the church and presbytery are good examples of mid- Victorian Gothic design by George Goldie, who was born in York and designed many Catholic churches in Yorkshire and elsewhere.  They make a strong statement on Westgate; the convent and schools less so. The quality of the interior of the church has been eroded by the re-ordering and re-decoration of the early 1970s, but some notable fittings survive in situ.

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Bradford - St Theresa and St Winefride

A striking 1970s church with impressive interior special qualities and many furnishings designed for the church.

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Bradford - St William

This inner city church is an important local landmark, built in a stripped Gothic style. The interior retains its spatial quality with some good fittings.

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Bradford- St Anthony of Padua

An interesting Post War church by a firm of architects who specialised in Catholic churches. Not however nationally significant and compromised by the removal of the original steel ‘tower’ and by the replacement of windows in UPVC.

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Brighouse - St Joseph

Example of a once fairly common building type, the combined church and school. Originally designed by Edward Simpson but enlarged and rebuilt at various stages in the second half of the 20th  century by the Langtry-Langton  partnership.  The  building  makes  a modest contribution to the local street scene.

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Burley-in-Wharfedale - St John Fisher and St Thomas More

A modest inter-war church in the Early Christian style, with a light, Arts and Crafts-influenced interior. The church forms an attractive group with its presbytery and parish hall.

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Carlton - St Mary

A modest, but well-executed early work of the prominent Yorkshire architect M.E. Hadfield, containing good quality later 19th  century furnishings, some by J.F. Bentley. The church and churchyard contain memorials to members of the ancient Stapleton family resident at nearby Carlton Towers.

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Castleford - St Joseph

A rather old fashioned building for 1890, with a traditional aisled plan and little embellishment. The post-Vatican II internal character is much enhanced by a good set of stained glass windows by Joseph Nuttgens of 1972.

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Cleckheaton - St Paul

A modest red brick church by J. H. Langtry-Langton in a  simplified version of the Romanesque style.

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Clifford - St Edward King and Confessor

An outstanding church of striking neo-Norman design. Inspired in some respects by Durham Cathedral, designed by Joseph Hansom from plans drawn up in France by an otherwise-unknown, dying draughtsman named Ramsey. The Romanesque detailing is applied consistently to the internal furnishings. Some stained glass attributed to A.W.N. Pugin. Built by the mill-owning Grimston family, the church dominates its village setting. Its later tower by George Goldie is a landmark in the surrounding countryside.

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Cross Hills, Silsden - St Joseph

A very modest 1920s church of no architectural or artistic importance.

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Dewsbury - Our Lady and St Paulinus

A handsome and dramatically-sited Gothic Revival church by E. W. Pugin, with some good furnishings.

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Dewsbury - St Thomas More

The church has some architectural interest as a characteristic building of the mid 1950s by a well-known local architect.

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Earby - St Patrick

A modest and conservative stone-built church of the 1920s.

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Elland - St Patrick

A fairly typical Post-War church in a modern idiom with aspects, such as the broad ‘slots’ of glazing reminiscent of the 1950s and the Festival of Britain. There is nothing out of the ordinary about the building or most of its fittings, but the east window stained glass is excellent.

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Featherstone - St Gerard Majella

A small, simple brick church of the 1930s.

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