Introduction

Diocese of Leeds

The Diocese of Leeds comprises the whole of West Yorkshire, with the exception of the parish of Todmorden, together with parishes in the East Riding, North Yorkshire, Greater Manchester and Lancashire. Below you will find 'Taking Stock' reports on the Churches and Chapels of the diocese in alphabetical order. If you can't find what you're looking, please use the search box in the top right-hand corner of this page.

Goole - St Joseph & St Thomas

An interesting use of Free Style Gothic features and cast concrete for ‘stone’ details (including doors, windows and the statue of St Joseph on the tower). The impressive interior space appears more centrally planned because of the c1995 western hall but it remains coherent; few original fittings survive.

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Halifax - Our Lady of Lourdes and St Malachy

A bold and distinctive 1960s church of considerable character by  an architect known for his Catholic churches in the Yorkshire area.

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Halifax - St Bernard

A good example of the work of Edward Simpson who ran his practice from Bradford and was active during the period 1870-1914. It is in the tradition of the big, rather austere, urban churches of James Brooks and his imitators. Conceived on a grand scale but with sparseness and heaviness of detailing. All the more dramatic for its precipitous siting. The austerity of the interior is relieved by the lighter Gothic furnishings.

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Halifax - St Columba

One of the later churches by Charles Simpson (the practice closed down in  1939).  Though  not  architecturally  distinguished,  the  church  is  of some merit, especially the treatment of the eastern parts. Altar and pulpit by Thomas Earp.

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Halifax - St Marie

A most curious and interesting church, with a complex and unclear building history. Although something of a mixture, the building has much character, with the strong muscular design of the tower and the almost Georgian Gothick quality of much of the interior. Good stained glass.

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Halifax -St Alban

Built as a parish hall in 1954 and, unsurprisingly, of no architectural distinction.

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Harrogate - Our Lady Immaculate and St Robert

A muscular red brick essay in French 13th century Gothic, typical of the work of Goldie and Child. The original sanctuary arrangements have been largely lost, but the interior retains its original volumes and a number of furnishings of interest.

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Harrogate - St Aelred of Rievaulx

A pleasing 1950s brick church of simple Modern design with classical references;  the previous Arts and Crafts church survives as a  parish hall.

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Harrogate - St Joseph

An attractive and quirky Arts and Crafts Gothic design, built originally as a school-cum-church. The building forms a pleasing element in the local townscape.

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Haworth - Our Lady of Lourdes

A modest Gothic church of the 1920s by a local architectural practice which specialised in building Catholic churches. Though undistinguished, it is an attractive small church, built from local stone and entirely harmonious within its setting.

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Heckmondwike - Holy Spirit

A fine example of a Catholic church in the Byzantine style fashionable in the wake of the building of Westminster Cathedral. Fr John O’Connor, who later built the liturgically-pioneering church of the First Martyrs, Bradford (qv) contributed significantly to the cost of construction.

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Howden - Sacred Heart

A modest church by the nationally-known Catholic architect J.A. Hansom. The main interest now lies in its plain but cleanly expressed exterior. The roofs inside are nicely detailed, but the only fittings of interest are the altar and stained glass at the east end of the south nave aisle.

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Huddersfield - English Martyrs

A modern church of fortress-like appearance, its internal design reflecting the liturgical reforms of the 1960s.

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Huddersfield - Our Lady of Lourdes

The building has some historic interest for its origin as a cinema serving a new inter-war housing estate and for the later conversion to church use, but is of little architectural interest.

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Huddersfield - St Joseph

Church and school building in domestic 17th century style, originally built for Anglican use. The church interior shows the influence of the English Arts and Crafts movement, not least in the elaborate roof construction.

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Huddersfield - St Patrick

St Patrick’s was the first purpose-built church of the 19th century Roman Catholic Revival in Huddersfield.  The builder Joseph Kaye adopted the thin Gothic style of the Anglican Commissioner’s Churches for the exterior and the interior, with its plaster vaulting.

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Keighley - Our Lady of Victories

An unusual re-use of an historic farm complex as a church and presbytery. The church itself is essentially a building of 1939 and not of inherent architectural importance but it is of historic interest and the remainder of the complex is of both architectural and historic significance.

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Keighley - St Anne

Important as an early church by Pugin (albeit that his early works were often rather dull), and in the vanguard of the emerging Gothic revival. Pugin’s church was retained and turned around when the church was more than doubled in size in 1906-7 by Edward Simpson. Important also for its richly finished interior of 1908-15.

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Keighley - St Joseph

St Joseph’s is a remarkable 1930s essay in the Norman style, impressive in its scale, completeness and reference to the decorative piers at Durham Cathedral and elsewhere. Godfrey Clarke, the architect, a local man trained with several London firms before returning to Yorkshire. He favoured the Romanesque style for churches, that at Hoyland, near Barnsley (Italian Romanesque in style) being a good example, but St Joseph’s stands alone in scale and attention to detail.

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Kinsley - Our Lady of Graces

A plain red brick rectangular building with little architectural decoration, but with some interesting modern secondary glazing by a local artist.

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