Introduction

Diocese of Leeds

The Diocese of Leeds comprises the whole of West Yorkshire, with the exception of the parish of Todmorden, together with parishes in the East Riding, North Yorkshire, Greater Manchester and Lancashire. Below you will find 'Taking Stock' reports on the Churches and Chapels of the diocese in alphabetical order. If you can't find what you're looking, please use the search box in the top right-hand corner of this page.

Knaresborough - St Mary

Although built forty years after the 2nd  Relief Act and two years after Catholic Emancipation, this church displays a high degree of architectural reticence, disguised as a domestic appendage to the contemporary presbytery. The design is restrainedly classical. The continuous frontage of church and presbytery forms an important grouping in the conservation area. The church retains its original internal volume and a restored plaster ceiling but has otherwise lost is historic furnishings.

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Leeds - Cathedral Church of St Anne

St Anne’s is unique in England as a cathedral built in the Arts and Crafts Gothic style. Almost square on plan, it was in one phase between 1902-4, replacing an earlier cathedral built in the 1830s and demolished in 1904 to make way for road improvements. The fitting out of the building by the architects Eastwood and Grendslade  is  of  a  consistently  high quality, and gives the building an overall stylistic unity. This quality has been respected in a major recent reordering by Buttress Fuller Alsop Williams Architects.

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Leeds - Christ the King

Modest brick church in simplified Romanesque style, the first of several churches built after the First World War in the suburbs of Leeds with support from the New Mission Fund. The church, parish room and presbytery form an attractive group at the heart of a small conservation area.

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Leeds - Corpus Christi

Large and little-altered Modern Romanesque church of unusual plan, built in 1960 for the Oblate Fathers by the well-known Manchester firm of Reynolds and Scott. The interior is particularly impressive, both for its spatial qualities and for the quality and expense of the marble, hardwood and mosaic furnishings.

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Leeds - Holy Family

Red brick Gothic Revival church of 1895, serving a poor area. Architecturally the least ambitious of three churches in the diocese by John Kelly, the finest individual feature is the great west window.

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Leeds - Holy Name of Jesus

Modest church of the early 1950s, considerably enlarged and enhanced by Peter Langtry-Langton in 1979. There is a particularly fine sequence of dalle de verre windows by the Hardman Studios in the aisles.

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Leeds - Holy Rosary

Large interwar church in a stripped Modern/Early Christian style, forming a good townscape counterpoint to the grade II listed former synagogue.   The interior has been much altered and contains no furnishings of great significance apart from the original baldacchino.

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Leeds - Holy Spirit

Simple early 20th  century Gothic chapel, built for Nonconformist use, providing an architectural focus and point of historical continuity in a part of Leeds otherwise mostly redeveloped in the post-War era.

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Leeds - Immaculate Heart of Mary

Late example of the revived Byzanto-Romanesque style, popular for Catholic churches between the wars. The external sale and massing are impressive, though the detailing somewhat mean. The interior, by contrast is a fairly intimate space, eschewing historical detail.

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Leeds - Our Lady of Good Counsel

Italian Romanesque design of 1960 by Desmond Williams, conservative for its  time, but a local landmark which houses some furnishings  of good quality, in particular a statue of Our Lady and a Crucifix by Michael Clark (1918-1990).

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Leeds - Our Lady of Lourdes

Large hall-cum-church of the 1920s, of interest primarily for its 1959 internal remodelling by Derek Walker.

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Leeds - St Anthony of Padua

Attractive though unremarkable red brick Gothic design of the early 20th century by Charles Fox of Dewsbury, who built widely in the diocese, usually in a simplified Romanesque style. The 1960s bell towers an unusual design and something of a local landmark. The internal volume impresses, and there are some furnishings of note.

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Leeds - St Augustine of Canterbury

A large and impressive brick church of the 1930s, conventional in plan but bold and original in design. The modern, jazzy detailing owes something to both Northern European church design of the early 20th century, and to contemporary figures such as N.F. Cachemaille-Day. St Augustine’s is one of three large churches built in Leeds shortly before the war by the local architects Gribbon, Foggitt & Brown. It won the RIBA Bronze Medal for 1936. The sanctuary was remodelled by Derek Walker in 1960, with good fittings, including a large mosaic by Roy Lewis.

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Leeds - St Brigid

Small brick church in the simplified Romanesque style so popular between the wars.

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Leeds - St Gregory the Great

Built in 1970 from designs by the Liverpool architects L.A.G. Prichard & Son, to serve the Swarcliffe housing estate. On plan the church forms a square within an octagon. The primary significance of the building lies not so much in its architectural form, which is unremarkable for its time, but more in the quality and extent of its internal fitting out. Of particular note is the stained glass by Jerzy Faczynski and the ceramic reliefs by Adam Kossowski, both of whom worked for the Liverpool architects  Weightman  &  Bullen  on  such  major  commissions  as  St Mary’s, Leyland.

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Leeds - St Joseph and St Peter

Utilitarian hall structure of the 1950s, given some architectural dignity by Peter Langtry-Langton’s remodelling of 1984.

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Leeds - St Nicholas

Advanced design by Weightman and Bullen, comparable in some ways with that practice’s slightly earlier church of St Ambrose, Speke (Archdiocese of Liverpool), notably in the roughly square plan, high level glazing, and adjoining openwork campanile. The austere character of the exterior somewhat belies the refined nature of the interior, where the quality of light and space complements its advanced liturgical design. The building has been little altered since it was built in 1961, and houses a number of furnishings of good quality.

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Leeds - St Theresa of the Child Jesus

Unremarkable post-War brick church, built from designs prepared before the War by Stephen Simpson, and much altered and extended in 1980. Notable for its collection of furnishings by David John.

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Leeds - St Urban

Modest 1960s church in a stripped Modern Gothic style, prominent in the Headingley Conservation Area.

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Leeds - St Wilfred

Characterful   modern   Gothic   design   with   a   little-altered   interior, redolent of the Festival of Britain. The church contains some good furnishings, notably a white marble altar, the form of which follows the curvature of the apse.

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