Introduction

Diocese of Leeds

The Diocese of Leeds comprises the whole of West Yorkshire, with the exception of the parish of Todmorden, together with parishes in the East Riding, North Yorkshire, Greater Manchester and Lancashire. Below you will find 'Taking Stock' reports on the Churches and Chapels of the diocese in alphabetical order. If you can't find what you're looking, please use the search box in the top right-hand corner of this page.

Leeds - The Assumption of Our Lady

Functional building of the 1950s serving a large parish; not of architectural or historic importance.

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Mirfield - St Aidan

The building is an interwar warehouse structure converted to a church in 1955. It is of little architectural or historic interest.

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Moorthorpe - St Joseph

A large and impressive Classical building that is of major townscape importance, especially the bold west front to Barnsley Road. The simplicity of the internal architecture and the lack of any furnishings of note create a somewhat characterless interior and the modern suspended ceiling and infilling detracts from the impact of the west window.

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Morley - St Francis

Relatively modest stone-built early 20th  century Gothic church by Edward Simpson, with elaborate sanctuary furnishings post-dating the First World War. The church, presbytery and former schoolrooms form a good group on the edge of the Morley Town Centre Conservation Area.

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Normanton - St John the Baptist

A large church with an impressive interior. The architect Edward Simpson  has  created  some  unusual  features  (such  as  the  southwest tower and nave roof) though some of his detailing is clumsy. The 2003 internal west end social space has been completed to a high standard.

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Ossett - St Ignatius

A  seemly   and  well-proportioned  cruciform  church  decorated  with simple elements within its external brickwork. The single space interior is less successful visually and there are no fittings of particular note.

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Otley - Our Lady and All Saints

Decorated Gothic design by Charles Hansom built on the site of the medieval manor house of the Archbishop of York. The church was built largely  at  the  expense  of  Thomas  Constable,  a  local  Catholic,  in  the wake of large-scale Irish immigration into the town.

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Pateley Bridge - Our Lady Immaculate

A small stone-built Gothic chapel built to service the needs of a mainly immigrant Irish population in the early 20th century.

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Pontefract - Holy Family

An impressive modern church of good materials, carefully designed in 1961 by a nationally-important architect, Derek Walker, in accordance with contemporary liturgical thinking. It retains its architect-designed good  quality  furniture  and  fine  works  of art,  though  the  original internal  character  has  been  compromised  by  the  loss  of  the  stained glass lantern and the painting of the exposed brick.

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Pontefract - St Joseph

An important and relatively unaltered example of an urban pre- Emancipation Act public Catholic church, resembling other non-Church of England places of worship. Its setting has been damaged by the dual carriageway to the east that cuts it off from the rest of the conservation area and although there are no original fittings, it retains its early 19th century character.

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Pudsey - St Joseph

A simple but pleasing design in the stripped-down Romanesque style so popular between the wars.

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Queensbury - St Theresa of the Child Jesus

 A curious chapel-like church in a hybrid round-arched style. Compact in its use of a sloping site to accommodate ancillary uses below the church. Of modest architectural pretension.

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Ripon - St Wilfrid

A cleverly designed church of 1860-2 by J.A. Hansom in the early French Gothic style, which manages to both dominate the north-east skyline of the city while remaining harmoniously situated within its immediate neighbourhood. The relatively unassuming exterior belies the dramatic and richly adorned interior.

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Rothwell - St Mary

Small inter-war church by Charles Fox, in his trademark round-arched style, in an attractive suburban setting overlooking a public park.

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Scarthingwell - Immaculate Conception & St John of Beverley

An interesting essay in mixed architectural styles that essentially attempts   to   recreate   an   Italian   Romanesque   private   chapel.   The Atkinson brothers are third generation architects in Yorkshire who designed many classical Catholic churches and although its form and scale might be based on Everingham, the detailing is quite original and of some quality. This church (with the walled garden to the north) is also all that remains to demonstrate the Catholic history of this site.

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Selby - St Mary

A well composed church with much external carved detail that takes full advantage  of  its  site,  with  the  steeple over  the  south  porch  being  of particular importance in the townscape. The interior is of less interest, though the chancel does retain its original good quality stone furnishings and stained glass and there is an extraordinary grotto of 1931 formed in an octagonal addition at the northwest.

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Settle - St Mary and St Michael

An unusual linear complex of church hall, church and presbytery, the church itself the least architecturally interesting element.

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Sherburn-in-Elmet - St Joseph the Worker

St Joseph’s was built in 1984 to serve as both church and parish centre, using good contemporary materials that are shared with the surrounding housing. It has worn well and remains a useful building that fits its setting, but has limited architectural interest.

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Shipley - St Walburga

A pleasing post-war design making a positive contribution to the street scene in a leafy part of Shipley, with a little-altered interior and a tall landmark tower. The longitudinal plan is conventional for its time, on the eve of the Second Vatican Council.

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Sicklinghall - Immaculate Conception

Gothic Revival church built for the recusant Middleton family from designs by Charles Hansom, with later additions attributed to E.W.Pugin. With the adjacent presbytery and monastery, the church forms a prominent central feature of the Sicklinghall conservation area.

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