Acklam - St Francis of Assisi

An interwar design in Early Christian-cum-Italianate style, this is a well-composed, generously-scaled building which forms an important local visual focus.

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Acomb - Our Lady

Post-war suburban church in brick Basilican style, with a handsome interior.

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Ampleforth - Our Lady and St Benedict

Early 20th century stone built church, built by and served from Ampleforth Abbey. It contains a number of internal furnishings of note, particularly the painting over the reredos on the east wall. The building was considerably enlarged in the late 1980s, but this was done in a seamless and contextual manner and did not compromise its character.

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Ampleforth - St Lawrence's Abbey Church

The Abbey church of Ampleforth is a major work by the distinguished 20th century church architect, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott OM. Replacing a mid-19th century church by Charles Hansom, it was built in two phases. The earlier phase consisted of the retrochoir and high altar, built over a crypt and completed in 1922. This is in the Romanesque style of Aquitaine, and is richly carved with blue Hornton stone dressings. The crossing, transepts and nave were completed in 1961, to a simplified design, also by Scott. The church therefore illustrates both his early and mature work, achieving unity despite the contrasting character of the two phases. The building is roughly Greek cross in plan; Scott was keen to ensure proximity to and visibility towards his High Altar. While the detail is medievalising, the planning is in some respects classical, having resonances with Wren’s Greek Cross scheme for St Paul’s. Notable furnishings designed by Scott include the High Altar and the reredos in the Memorial Chapel. There is also much other later enrichment, notably a series of windows on a Marian theme by Patrick and John Reyntiens. 

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Bedale - St Mary and St Joseph

A good example of a small mid-Victorian Catholic church, paid for by a local landowning family who employed an established architect for the work. Despite some alterations, the building retains much of its original character.

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Beechwood - St Thomas More

This is one of a number of cheaply-built churches put up in suburban districts in the early 1960s to serve growing populations. It abandons the traditional, longitudinal plan in favour of a hexagonal one.

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Beverley - St John of Beverley

Quite an unusual design for an early 20th century Catholic church, perhaps more in the style of Nonconformist churches of the time by architects such as George Baines. A good example of the work of Smith, Brodrick & Lowther, the primary importance of the building lies in its frontage and contribution to the conservation area.

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Bridlington - Our Lady and St Peter

A good example of a late Victorian Gothic Revival Catholic church. Smith, Brodrick & Lowther were a busy firm of architects in Hull with a varied practice. 

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Brookfield- St Clare of Assisi

This is a church from towards the end of T.A. Crawford’s career in designing churches for the Middlesbrough diocese. In contrast to his earlier work, the design is stripped back to very bare essentials. The sheer brick lines of the church give an almost industrial quality. The interior unfolds from the simplicity of the planning and the massing of the exterior: it is spacious, clean and light and, with its relatively large size, makes a dramatic impact. 

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Brotton - St Anthony of Padua

The church is a modest structure built at the start of the 20th century. The exterior is plain and simple and has not been enhanced by the rebuilding and enlargement of the western porch. The chief interest lies inside in what is a very elaborate decorative scheme for a small wayside church.

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Clifton - St Joseph

A simple design built of rustic brick, with a Westmorland slate roof. The attached brick campanile lends it a certain presence in the townscape. Plain, bright interior with some details of Art Deco character.

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Cottingham - Holy Cross

A much-altered church that was never architectural distinguished but that serves its purpose well and is clearly well used.

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Crathorne - St Mary

This chapel is of exceptional importance on both historic and architectural grounds. The exterior is typically modest for a Catholic chapel of its time, but the interior is a remarkably complete survival and its ensemble of box pews, gallery and rich Gothick decoration is of the highest quality. 

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Dormanstown - St William

An example of the widespread use of red-brick, round-arched architecture for Catholic churches between the wars, in this case with simple Lombardic features. The tower is something of a local landmark. The interior is well-proportioned, light and has good clean lines. 

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Driffield - Our Lady and St Edward

 A fairly unusual church in its combined use of red brick and terracotta and neo-Norman design. Modest but nicely and consistently detailed and with striking internal arches. The architect Edward Simpson designed a number of Catholic churches in the north of England.

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Easingwold - St John the Evangelist

Simple stone lancet Gothic church, single cell with contemporary attached presbytery behind. An early (possibly the earliest) work by Joseph Hansom. The interior is plain, with a west gallery.

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East Harsley - Our Lady of Mount Grace

Architecturally the chapel and its associated buildings are modest and the chapel itself is mainly a mid-20th century reconstruction. The real importance of the site is a long, largely continuous history of Catholic devotion. In penal times it was a popular destination for pilgrims and it still receives many visitors and Mass is said weekly.

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Egton Bridge - St Hedda

A good Victorian church by a noted Sheffield firm of architects who designed much for Catholic clients. On a site with a long tradition of Catholic worship (the original church of 1790 survives adjoining). 

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Filey - St Mary

The unremarkable external appearance of this early 20th century church conceals an interior of rich polychromatic decoration, the fruit of pioneering studies in early Christian symbolism, art and liturgy carried out by the first parish priest, Fr Eugene Roulin.

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Gilling East - Our Lady and the Holy Angels

The significance of this building lies not in the architectural qualities of the chapel, which are modest, but in the fact that it forms part of a stone lodge to Gilling Castle, built in Tudor style in 1837.

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