Hull - St Vincent de Paul

A good and complete 1930s church of the traditional Early Christian style popular with Inter-War Catholic churches, with the majority of its original fittings and furnishing remaining. The church is almost identical in design to the same architects’ English Martyrs, York. 

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Hull - St Wilfrid

Broadly traditional in its planning and architectural expression, St Wilfrid’s and the attached presbytery are well-designed, and the church is complete with contemporary furnishing, all strongly redolent of the Festival ofBritainera.

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Kirkbymoorside - St Chad

Attractive late 19th century small stone-built church in lancet Gothic style, set within a churchyard on the edge of the conservation area. The church contains some furnishings of interest, notably some carved wooden panels from a 17th century altar previously at Gilling Castle. 

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Lealholm - Our Lady and the Sacred Heart

A small church of modest architectural pretension. Pevsner is perhaps a little too harsh in commenting ‘not a job to do any architect credit’. 

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Leyburn - St Peter and St Paul

With its Georgian Gothick character, the church is perhaps old-fashioned for its date, after Catholic Emancipation and coinciding with the ascent of Puginian Gothic. Nevertheless, this is a very complete and unaltered building, and the box pews are a highly unusual and valuable survival in a Catholic chapel. The church, presbytery and school form a handsome group.  

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Linthorpe - Holy Name of Mary

One of a number of churches by Thomas A. Crawford for the diocese of Middlesbrough. It is a carefully designed 1930s brick church which forms a prominent landmark on its corner site. A notable feature of the interior is the artwork by Sir Frank Brangwyn. 

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Malton - St Leonard and St Mary

Much restored church of 12th century origin, occupying a prominent position in the townscape on the east side of Malton. Built as a chapel of ease for the nearby Gilbertine monastery, this is possibly the first parish church in England to revert to Catholic use. The most notable feature of the interior is the Romanesque arcading on the north side of the nave and chancel. 

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Market Weighton - Our Lady of Perpetual Help

A pleasant 1960s church but not architecturally distinguished or of any particular interest for its date. It is not significant in the townscape.

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Marske-by-the-Sea, Redcar - St Bede

The church is an attractive if modest essay in inter-war brick church-building using a round-arched style. The church was probably built to a modest budget but it has pleasing lines and some attractive, if simple, detailing. 

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Middlesbrough - Sacred Heart and St Patrick

The massive bulk of this church has a very un-English appearance. This is because it was modelled on the Romanesque abbey church of the Benedictine monastery of St André at Kopen near Bruges in Belgium. The interior is especially notable for its mosaic decoration and ornamental stone and marble. The mosaic-lined baptistery and the Harry Clarke stained glass are also notable features. All this adds up to a building with a striking external presence and an interior of unusually lavish decoration.

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Middlesbrough - St Joseph

Early Christian/Italianate church built in 1933-4, apparently to the designs of Bishop Thomas Shine. The building has a fine presence in this part of Middlesbrough and is a landmark on the Marton Road. 

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Middlesbrough - St Mary's Cathedral

The Cathedral and its associated complex form a large and visually prominent feature in the area and are also of central importance in the life of the diocese. However, they are but twenty years old, and it is probably premature to start making judgements about their historic and aesthetic worth.

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North Ormesby - St Alphonsus

The church dates from the late 1950s, before the changed design ideas that flowed from Vatican II – hence the longitudinal planning and aisles. The treatment of the arcades to the latter is the most distinctive feature of the church, with simple square piers supporting a lintel. The design shows a need for economy and to obtain as much accommodation as possible with limited means. Architecturally it is a building of only modest interest although the two windows either side of the sanctuary are of high quality.

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Ormesby - St Gabriel

St Gabriel’s is a mainstream example of 1970s Catholic church building in which the worship area is made square to ensure maximum visibility and audibility. 

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Osmotherley - Our Lady of Mount Grace

The building in which the chapel is housed has a plain 18th-century frontage and is one of the larger structures in the village. The importance of the chapel lies not so much in the restrained Georgian architectural qualities of the building, but for over three centuries of Catholic witness that has taken place there. Its historic significance is therefore considerable.

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Oswaldkirk - St Aidan

This church, built in the 1960s, is not of special architectural or historic interest, but occupies a prominent position on a raised site on the edge of the village. 

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Pickering - St Joseph

Prominent and attractively grouped church and hall designed by Leonard Stokes, with the careful massing and fine attention to detail for which that architect is known. The church contains a beautiful carved font by Eric Gill. Notable for its associations with the 17th century Catholic martyr Blessed Nicholas Postgate.  

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Pocklington - St Mary and St Joseph

The original church was a fairly typical mid-Victorian Gothic building by a highly respected Yorkshire Roman Catholic architect, many of whose churches are now listed. The extensive enlargements, whilst tactfully done, undermine the architectural integrity of the original building and render it as much a 21st century as a 19th century building.

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Redcar - Sacred Heart

Built on the eve of the First World War, the church is a late and relatively modest example of the use of fully-developed Gothic Revival architecture for a Catholic church. It has some architectural distinction, especially internally. An unusual feature is the use of terracotta for most of the dressings. 

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Redcar - St Alban

St Alban’s was built at a time of rapid expansion of social housing in the area and the building reflects a need for economy. The design is a routine one of its time, and lacks refinement or inspiration.  

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